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  • Burmipachytrocta singularis Azar et al., 2015


    Images:

    oilshale
    • Characteristics of the family Pachytroctidae

      Head:  

      Antennae usually have 15 segments.

      The first 4-5 segments of the antennae do not have sculpturing; other segments have ringed sculpturing (annulations).

      Eyes are relatively large, compared to related families.

      Legs: 

      Tarsi have 3 segments.

      Hind legs are long and the femur is not flattened (as in Liposcelidae).

      Wings: 

      Adults can be have full-length wings or short wings, or can be wingless.

      Full-length wings are held flat over back when at rest.

      Forewings are rounded.

      Forewing veins are distinct:

      Areola postica is narrow, long and flat.

      Pterostigma is not thickened (as in Psocomorpha).      

      Vein M has 2 branches.

      Veins Cu2 and Cu1A reach the wing margin separately.

      Abdomen:

      Abdominal segments often partially membranous on back surface.

      Male: 

      Clunium is absent.

      Phallosome is closed at the base with complex structures on the posterior end.

      Female: 

      Subgenital plate sometimes has T-shaped sclerite, as in related families.

      Gonapophyses are complete and hairless:

      External valve is large without lobes.

       

      image.png.29389c0b7062406d3df03b37281cbd93.png

       

      Literature:

      Dany Azar, Diying Huang, Chenyang Cai, André Nel. 2015. The earliest records of pachytroctid booklice from Lebanese and Burmese Cretaceous ambers (Psocodea, Troctomorpha, Nanopsocetae, Pachytroctidae) 

      Cretaceous Research Volume 52, Part B, January 2015, Pages 336-347

    Taxonomy

    thick barklouse

    Kingdom: Animalia
    Phylum: Arthropoda
    Class: Insecta
    Order: Psocodea
    Family: Pachytroctidae
    Genus: Burmipachytrocta
    Species: Burmipachytrocta singularis

    Geological Time Scale

    Eon: Phanerozoic
    Era: Mesozoic
    Period: Cretaceous
    Epoch: Middle
    International Age: Albian (early)

    Stratigraphy

    unknown formation

    Provenance

    Acquired by: Purchase/Trade

    Location

    Hkamti mine
    Hkamti District
    Sagaing Region
    Burma

    Comments

    Characteristics of the family Pachytroctidae

    Head:  

    Antennae usually have 15 segments.

    The first 4-5 segments of the antennae do not have sculpturing; other segments have ringed sculpturing (annulations).

    Eyes are relatively large, compared to related families.

    Legs: 

    Tarsi have 3 segments.

    Hind legs are long and the femur is not flattened (as in Liposcelidae).

    Wings: 

    Adults can be have full-length wings or short wings, or can be wingless.

    Full-length wings are held flat over back when at rest.

    Forewings are rounded.

    Forewing veins are distinct:

    Areola postica is narrow, long and flat.

    Pterostigma is not thickened (as in Psocomorpha).      

    Vein M has 2 branches.

    Veins Cu2 and Cu1A reach the wing margin separately.

    Abdomen:

    Abdominal segments often partially membranous on back surface.

    Male: 

    Clunium is absent.

    Phallosome is closed at the base with complex structures on the posterior end.

    Female: 

    Subgenital plate sometimes has T-shaped sclerite, as in related families.

    Gonapophyses are complete and hairless:

    External valve is large without lobes.

     

    image.png.29389c0b7062406d3df03b37281cbd93.png

     

    Literature:

    Dany Azar, Diying Huang, Chenyang Cai, André Nel. 2015. The earliest records of pachytroctid booklice from Lebanese and Burmese Cretaceous ambers (Psocodea, Troctomorpha, Nanopsocetae, Pachytroctidae) 

    Cretaceous Research Volume 52, Part B, January 2015, Pages 336-347



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