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    Euproops bifidus Siegfried, 1972


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    Images:

    oilshale
    • Clay stone layer above the ‘Zweibänke’ coal seam.

      Steinbruch Piesberg is a sandstone quarry. The quarry itself has been active since the middle of the 19th century, but the mining activities at this location date from as early as 1461.

      The area was first mined for coal. Piesberg is one of the very few outcrops in Northern Germany where you can dig Carboniferous layers. The quarry itself is famous for its plant fossils from the Carboniferous period, but you can also find remains of dragonflies, roaches, arachnids, arthropleuridae, scorpions and of course horseshoe crabs. Freshwater shells also occur, but they are rare.

       

      Lit.:

      P. Siegfried. Ein Schwertschwanz aus dem Oberkarbon von Ibbenbüren / Westf., Paläontologische Zeitschrift, Vol. 46, Nr. 3-4 (1972), p. 180-185

    Taxonomy

    Horseshoe Crab

    Kingdom: Animalia
    Phylum: Arthropoda
    Class: Xiphosura
    Order: Xiphosurida
    Family: Bellinuridae
    Genus: Euproops
    Species: E. bifidus
    Author Citation Siegfried, 1972

    Geological Time Scale

    Eon: Phanerozoic
    Era: Paleozoic
    Period: Carboniferous
    Epoch: Late
    International Age: Silesian

    Stratigraphy

    Late Carboniferous Coal Measures
    Osnabrück Formation

    Biostratigraphy

    Flöz Zweibänke

    Provenance

    Collector: T. Bastelberger
    Date Collected: 07/01/2002
    Acquired by: Field Collection

    Location

    Zeche Piesberg
    Ibbenbüren
    Lower Saxony
    Germany

    Comments

    Clay stone layer above the ‘Zweibänke’ coal seam.

    Steinbruch Piesberg is a sandstone quarry. The quarry itself has been active since the middle of the 19th century, but the mining activities at this location date from as early as 1461.

    The area was first mined for coal. Piesberg is one of the very few outcrops in Northern Germany where you can dig Carboniferous layers. The quarry itself is famous for its plant fossils from the Carboniferous period, but you can also find remains of dragonflies, roaches, arachnids, arthropleuridae, scorpions and of course horseshoe crabs. Freshwater shells also occur, but they are rare.

     

    Lit.:

    P. Siegfried. Ein Schwertschwanz aus dem Oberkarbon von Ibbenbüren / Westf., Paläontologische Zeitschrift, Vol. 46, Nr. 3-4 (1972), p. 180-185

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