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  • Orygmaspis jenkinsi


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    MarcusFossils
    • My absolute favorite trilobite. 

    Taxonomy

    Kingdom: Animalia
    Phylum: Arthropoda
    Class: Trilobita
    Order: Asaphida
    Family: Parabolinoididae
    Genus: Orygmaspis
    Species: O. jenkinsi

    Geological Time Scale

    Era: Paleozoic
    Period: Cambrian
    Epoch: Late

    Stratigraphy

    Unit "H"
    Mckay Group

    Provenance

    Acquired by: Purchase/Trade

    Location

    Site 12
    British Columbia
    Canada

    Comments

    My absolute favorite trilobite. 



    User Feedback


    Nice! How big is it? Those pleural extensions are neat. :) 

     

    You know, you might have some challengers for favourite trilobites if you come over to the Ordovician and Devonian. They make them bigger with fascinatingly sophisticated eyes. ;) 

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    MarcusFossils

    Posted · Report

    9 minutes ago, Kane said:

    Nice! How big is it? Those pleural extensions are neat. :) 

     

    You know, you might have some challengers for favourite trilobites if you come over to the Ordovician and Devonian. They make them bigger with fascinatingly sophisticated eyes. ;) 

    It's roughly 1.5cm. It's also crystallized (!), which is my main reason for loving it.

     

    I do love the some of the Devonian bugs..but if I don't limit my focus to the Cambrian and Ordovician, I'll end up broke :P

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    FossilDAWG

    Posted · Report

    Lovely little trilobite.  I can see why you like it.

     

    I do have to take issue with your use of "sp. nov." in the name.  This designation can be used (at least, correctly) only in the actual paper in which the new species is described.  For example, suppose Smith publishes, in 2017, a paper in an appropriate journal (must be generally available to the research community, not just an in-house circular) a description of a new trilobite she names Mybug bigeyius.  In the paper Smith will name it Mybug bigeyius sp nov, meaning Mybug bigeyius new species.  Subsequently everyone who refers to that species must call it Mybug bigeyius Smith 2017, and reference the Smith 2017 publication.  If Jones tries to publish a paper and writes Mybug bigeyius sp nov, that would mean that he is trying to name a new species Mybug bigeyius which he cannot do as Smith has already used that name.

     

    In your case, where does the name Orygmaspis jenkinsi come from?  Has it been published?  In that case, you should use the name of the author(s) and the year of publication, and include a reference to the publication in the "details" or "more info" sections.  If it has not yet been published, but a publication is planned, you might actually endanger the name by using it in a public way as that could establish "priority" and exclude the use of the name subsequently.  The rules of scientific nomenclature are strict but they exist for a reason: to ensure there is only one valid name for a species, and also to ensure no two species (within a kingdom) have the same name.  If "Orygmaspis jennkinsi" has not been published, you should call your specimen Orygmaspis undescribed species" for now, and maybe note that publication by X (the author) is planned if that information is available.  Later when the species is properly published one of the curators or moderators can assist you to update the name of your entry.

     

    Hope this is all clear!

     

    Regards,

    Don C

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    MarcusFossils

    Posted · Report

    I do believe that the monograph describing this trilobite has been published, but I've yet to actually see it. I'll remove the incorrect name for now. 

     

    Thanks for the clarifications Don! 

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    MarcusFossils

    Posted · Report

    22 minutes ago, FossilDAWG said:

    I do have to take issue with your use of "sp. nov." in the name.  This designation can be used (at least, correctly) only in the actual paper in which the new species is described. 

     

    Had I simply written "Orygmaspis sp. nov.", would that have been incorrect? 

     

    Marc 

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    FossilDAWG

    Posted · Report

    I think that would be OK.

     

    I did a google search for Orygmaspis jenkinsi and came up empty, but that would not be surprising if the name had very recently been published.  I know that Brian Chatterton has a big manuscript either recently out or about to come out, and maybe it is in there?

     

    Don

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    And I just checked our stacks at the uni. Nothing there yet beyond mention of another species of Orygmaspis from 1983, and in reference to a paper by Longacre in 1970. :( 

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    MarcusFossils

    Posted · Report

    Here's the only evidence I have of this elusive monograph.

    Someone will probably get a hold of it in the coming months. 

     

     

    Screenshot_20170412-091705.png

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    DPS Ammonite

    Posted · Report

    We should contact the author, Chatterton, to see if it has been published yet.

     

    Here is a prior comment on TFFhttp://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/gallery/image/44160-orygmaspis-sp-nov/

     

    See: https://books.google.com/books/about/Furongian_Upper_Cambrian_Trilobites_from.html?id=sweFvgAACAAJ

     

    Maybe it hasn't been published yet: [16] Chatterton, B.D.E. & S. Gibb. Accepted with revision. Furongian (upper Cambrian) trilobites from the McKay Group, Bull River Valley, near Cranbrook, southeastern British Columbia, Canada. Palaeontographica Canadiana. Approximately 260 draft pages, 1 table, 18 text-figures and 84 plates.

     

    from     https://www.une.edu.au/staff-profiles/ers/stacey-gibb 

     

    A claim that it can be read here:   http://www.esbooks.info/book/furongian-upper-cambrian-trilobites-from-the-mckay-group-bull-river-valley-near-cranbrook-southeastern-british-columbia-canada/sweFvgAACAAJ/

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    piranha

    Posted · Report

    The new monograph will be published in Palaeontographica Canadiana. I have not yet heard a date.

     

    Watch the spelling. Starting with Don, Orygmaspis has been misspelled four times in this thread.

    The literature is split with various authors treating Parabolinoides as a subgenus of Orygmaspis.

     

    Here are the different published species:

     

    asperoensis 
    billingsi
    calvilimbata
    contracta
    cordillerensis
    eryon 
    firma
    hebe
    llanoensis
    microphthalmus
    occidentalis
    richardsoni
    spinula
    triangularis
    weedi

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    MarcusFossils

    Posted · Report

    3 minutes ago, piranha said:

    The new monograph will be published in Palaeontographica Canadiana. I have not yet heard a date.

     

    Thank you Scott! 

     

    My ID labels are suffering many sleepless nights waiting for this monograph to finally be available! 

     

    Marc

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    piranha

    Posted · Report

    14 minutes ago, FossilDAWG said:

    Oops sorry Scott.  Should be fixed now.

     

    Don

     

     

    Aside from rendering the google search function useless, the other spelling had quite an unintended connotation! :o :P

     

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    MarcusFossils

    Posted · Report

    11 minutes ago, piranha said:

     

     

    Aside from rendering the google search function useless, the other spelling had quite an unintended connotation! :o :P

     

     

    That made me giggle :P

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    piranha

    Posted · Report

    I found some additional info in this recent paper:

     

    Lerosey-Aubril, R., Paterson, J.R., Gibb, S.L., & Chatterton, B.D.E. (2017)

    Exceptionally-preserved late Cambrian fossils from the McKay Group (British Columbia, Canada) and the evolution of tagmosis in aglaspidid arthropods.

    Gondwana Research, 42:264-279  LINK

     

    The monograph is cited: Chatterton, B.D.E., & Gibb, S.L. (2016)

    Unfortunately, it is still not listed at the GAC Bookstore.

     

    The Gondwana Research paper confirms:

    Parabolinoides designated as a subgenus: Orygmaspis (Parabolinoides) contracta 

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    MarcusFossils

    Posted · Report

    On 6/17/2017 at 1:01 PM, piranha said:

    I found some additional info in this recent paper:

     

    Lerosey-Aubril, R., Paterson, J.R., Gibb, S.L., & Chatterton, B.D.E. (2017)

    Exceptionally-preserved late Cambrian fossils from the McKay Group (British Columbia, Canada) and the evolution of tagmosis in aglaspidid arthropods.

    Gondwana Research, 42:264-279  LINK

     

    The monograph is cited: Chatterton, B.D.E., & Gibb, S.L. (2016)

    Unfortunately, it is still not listed at the GAC Bookstore.

     

    The Gondwana Research paper confirms:

    Parabolinoides designated as a subgenus: Orygmaspis (Parabolinoides) contracta 

     

    Hi Scott, the monograph is finally available on the GAC Bookstore!

     

    Cheers, 

    Marc 

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    piranha

    Posted · Report

    12 minutes ago, MarcusFossils said:

     

    Hi Scott, the monograph is finally available on the GAC Bookstore!

     

    Cheers, 

    Marc 

     

     

    I already have it.  Cheers! :fistbump:

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    MarcusFossils

    Posted · Report

    5 minutes ago, piranha said:

     

     

    I already have it.  Cheers! :fistbump:

     

    Jealous! 

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