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    sixgill pete
    • Dinosaur teeth from North Carolina are rare and have only been found in a handful of locations. Other than one well known location, these other sites are kept very close to the vest for obvious reasons. Most North Carolina collectors will never find one.

       

      This tooth is a Dromaeosauridae, probably the most common theropod known from North Carolina. My tentative I.D. ?Sauronitholestes langstoni is based on photographs of a tooth that has been positively I.D.'d by Dr. David Schwimmer from the same site where I found this tooth. Once I get a confirmation or negative assessment I will either remove the question marks from my I.D. or just assign it as Dromaeosauridae indet.

    Taxonomy

    Dromaeosaur

    Kingdom: Animalia
    Phylum: Chordata
    Class: Reptilia
    Order: Saurischia
    Family: Dromaeosauridae
    Genus: ? Saurornitholestes
    Species: ? S. langstoni
    Author Citation Sues, 1978

    Geological Time Scale

    Eon: Phanerozoic
    Era: Mesozoic
    Period: Cretaceous
    Epoch: Late
    International Age: Campanian

    Stratigraphy

    Black Creek Group
    Bladen Formation

    Provenance

    Collector: Don Rideout
    Date Collected: 10/28/2017
    Acquired by: Field Collection

    Dimensions

    Blank: 9.8mm
    Width: 7.0mm

    Location

    Bladen County
    North Carolina
    United States

    Comments

    Dinosaur teeth from North Carolina are rare and have only been found in a handful of locations. Other than one well known location, these other sites are kept very close to the vest for obvious reasons. Most North Carolina collectors will never find one.

     

    This tooth is a Dromaeosauridae, probably the most common theropod known from North Carolina. My tentative I.D. ?Sauronitholestes langstoni is based on photographs of a tooth that has been positively I.D.'d by Dr. David Schwimmer from the same site where I found this tooth. Once I get a confirmation or negative assessment I will either remove the question marks from my I.D. or just assign it as Dromaeosauridae indet.



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    sixgill pete

    Posted · Report

    3 hours ago, Plax said:

    nice one Six! Did you try the South Carolina dino book for ID?

     

    I have not. I tried to download Dr. Schwimmer's paper on S.C. dino's but, have not been able to. I have sent him several photos by e-mail. 

     

    Do you have the book or a link to it?

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    I have the SC Dino book purchased online used. It was cheap. Got the info from Al Dente. I don't think that a pdf is available for a commercially produced book but could be wrong as it's from the American Philosophical Society.

      I don't have a SC dino paper by Schwimmer that I can easily find. Do you have the specific title? I have the Appalachiosaurus paper from Alabama and the Ceratopsian paper from NC as far as SE Dino pubs that are recent.

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    Troodon

    Posted · Report

    Outstanding tooth.  Looks too fat to be Dromeosaurid they are compressed more like a Tyrannosaurid.  

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