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  • Kalops monophrys Poplin & Lund, 2002


    Images:

    oilshale
    •  
      Taken from "Fossil Fishes of Bear Gulch" by Lund, Richard, and Grogan, E.D., 2005, Bear Gulch web site, www.sju.edu/research/bear_gulch, 1/11/2016 (last update from 2/1/2006)


      Kalops monophrys illustration
      Fossil (top), skull roof (lower left) and full body (lower right) reconstruction of Kalops monophrys

      Kalops monophrys is known by over 125 specimens from the Bear Gulch Limestone. K. monophrys is distinguished from its smaller sister species, Kalops diophrys, by having more caudal fin rays, a different number of supraorbital bone rows, and the development of its ganoine ridging at a larger size. The cranial osteology of Kalops most closely resembles that of the poorly known Palaeoniscus and "Elonichthys" serratus. The snout structure is closest to that of the Tarrasiiformes.

      Lit.:
      Poplin, C., & R. Lund. 2002. "Two Carboniferous fine-eyed paleoniscoids (Pisces, Actinopterygii) from Bear Gulch (USA)." Journal of Paleontology 76: 1014-1028.

      Fossil Fishes of Bear Gulch

    Taxonomy

    Palaeonisciformes

    Kingdom: Animalia
    Phylum: Chordata
    Class: Actinopterygii
    Order: Palaeonisciformes
    Family: incertae sedis
    Genus: Kalops
    Species: K. monophrys
    Author Citation Poplin & Lund, 2002

    Geological Time Scale

    Eon: Phanerozoic
    Era: Paleozoic
    Period: Carboniferous
    Epoch: Early
    International Age: Serpukhovian

    Stratigraphy

    Big Snowy Group
    Heath Shale Formation

    Provenance

    Acquired by: Purchase/Trade

    Location

    Bear Gulch
    Fergus County
    Montana
    United States

    Comments

     
    Taken from "Fossil Fishes of Bear Gulch" by Lund, Richard, and Grogan, E.D., 2005, Bear Gulch web site, www.sju.edu/research/bear_gulch, 1/11/2016 (last update from 2/1/2006)


    Kalops monophrys illustration
    Fossil (top), skull roof (lower left) and full body (lower right) reconstruction of Kalops monophrys

    Kalops monophrys is known by over 125 specimens from the Bear Gulch Limestone. K. monophrys is distinguished from its smaller sister species, Kalops diophrys, by having more caudal fin rays, a different number of supraorbital bone rows, and the development of its ganoine ridging at a larger size. The cranial osteology of Kalops most closely resembles that of the poorly known Palaeoniscus and "Elonichthys" serratus. The snout structure is closest to that of the Tarrasiiformes.

    Lit.:
    Poplin, C., & R. Lund. 2002. "Two Carboniferous fine-eyed paleoniscoids (Pisces, Actinopterygii) from Bear Gulch (USA)." Journal of Paleontology 76: 1014-1028.

    Fossil Fishes of Bear Gulch



    User Feedback


    Fossildude19

    Posted · Report

    Great fish, Thomas - I love your Bear Gulch collection!

    Amazing examples.

    (Actually, I love everything in your collection, truth be told. :P ) 

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    oilshale

    Posted · Report

    22 hours ago, Fossildude19 said:

    Great fish, Thomas - I love your Bear Gulch collection!

    Amazing examples.

    (Actually, I love everything in your collection, truth be told. :P ) 

    Thanks Tim,

    Bear Gulch is a great place with a lot of strange and interesting animals.

    Thomas

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    I heard not too long ago that bear gulch and surrounding area was bought up by two texas oil dudes and that no one is allowed to dig there anymore? 

     

    RB

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    oilshale

    Posted · Report

    4 hours ago, RJB said:

    I heard not too long ago that bear gulch and surrounding area was bought up by two texas oil dudes and that no one is allowed to dig there anymore? 

     

    RB

    It is sad, but that's what I've heard too. But I haven't been there for a long, long time.

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