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  • Dactylioceras tenuicostatum (Young & Bird 1822)


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    Ludwigia
    • This species gives its name to the zone and subzone at the bottom of the lower Toarcian.

      This very fine-ribbed specimen of the genus Dactylioceras is for me a fine representative for the legend of St. Hilda, the Abbess at the monastery in Whitby ca. 650 A.D. She wanted to build a convent there as well, but the grounds were infested with snakes, so she prayed so intensively that all of the snakes were turned into stone. Since then they are known as snakestones. I found this sample pretty well as is with a head that reminds us of a snake.

       

      Literature: Howarth, M.K. (1973): The Stratigraphy and Ammonite Fauna of the Upper Liassic Grey Shales of the Yorkshire Coast. Bulletin of the British Museum

                        (Natural History) Geology. Vol.24 No.4

    Taxonomy

    Ammonite

    Kingdom: Animalia
    Phylum: Mollusca
    Class: Cephalopoda
    Order: Ammonitida
    Family: Dactylioceratidae
    Genus: Dactylioceras
    Species: D. tenuicostatum
    Author Citation Young & Bird 1822

    Geological Time Scale

    Eon: Phanerozoic
    Era: Mesozoic
    Period: Jurassic
    Epoch: Early
    International Age: Early Toarcian

    Stratigraphy

    Whitby Mudstone Formation

    Biostratigraphy

    tenuicostatum zone
    tenuicostatum subzone

    Provenance

    Collector: Roger Furze
    Date Collected: 06/20/2010
    Acquired by: Field Collection

    Dimensions

    Diameter: 5cm

    Location

    Ravenscar
    Yorkshire
    England
    United Kingdom

    Comments

    This species gives its name to the zone and subzone at the bottom of the lower Toarcian.

    This very fine-ribbed specimen of the genus Dactylioceras is for me a fine representative for the legend of St. Hilda, the Abbess at the monastery in Whitby ca. 650 A.D. She wanted to build a convent there as well, but the grounds were infested with snakes, so she prayed so intensively that all of the snakes were turned into stone. Since then they are known as snakestones. I found this sample pretty well as is with a head that reminds us of a snake.

     

    Literature: Howarth, M.K. (1973): The Stratigraphy and Ammonite Fauna of the Upper Liassic Grey Shales of the Yorkshire Coast. Bulletin of the British Museum

                      (Natural History) Geology. Vol.24 No.4



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