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Coastline of the Crackingon Formation.

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Chris Jones
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Chris Jones

The coastline of the Crackingon Formation, most photos were taken along walks on the surrounding cliffs in 2017, it's my favourite beach. 

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minnbuckeye

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beautiful landscape!!!!!

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Chris Jones

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9 minutes ago, minnbuckeye said:

beautiful landscape!!!!!

Thanks, it's one of my all time favourite landscapes.  :)

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minnbuckeye

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So that is a town in the valley?? What type of fossils are there at the beach? The reason I ask, I am planning to take my wife to England soon (post covid) and would like to stay in multiple coastal towns. The pictures are so appealing that I added it to the list of possibilities. 

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Chris Jones

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4 hours ago, minnbuckeye said:

So that is a town in the valley?? What type of fossils are there at the beach? The reason I ask, I am planning to take my wife to England soon (post covid) and would like to stay in multiple coastal towns. The pictures are so appealing that I added it to the list of possibilities. 

Sorry for the late reply. In the valley there's the small village called Crackington Haven, there's a restaurant, and a few places people wanting to go there can stay (my family has houses called Tremorva, which is on a cliffside, and Stable End there, but I think they are a little expensive :)). You can find mostly Goniatites there, but I once found a fish fossil, but lost it in a rock pool. There's also a shipwreck on the adjacent beach, called the S-89, a German WW2 E-boat, but it involves climbing over a lot of rock pools to get to it. 

Nearby there's Boscastle, which is another of my favourite places, which also happens to have a great fossil and rock shop. There's also Tintagel nearby, which has many rock and fossil shops, and the famous Tintagel castle ruins.

 

It's definitely an area I'd recommend. Hopefully this helps.:)

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Chris Jones

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I just had a double check, and found a few more fossil areas within very close distance from Crackington Haven, I just copied these from a website, most of these I hadn't even heard of. :)

 

Bude Formation, it is poor in fossils. However, the formation does boast a unique, 300-million-year-old fish, the goldfish-sized Cornuboniscus budensis, found nowhere else in the world! Plentiful crinoids and solitary corals can be seen (but not collected) in quarried limestone blocks used to build parts of Bude breakwater in the early 1800s).

 

Califrnia Quarry, an old, cliff top quarry, situated along the coastal footpath near Boscastle, was once rich in trilobites. Today, most of the quarry has fallen into the sea, but a small part still exists with blocks that can yield fossils when split.

 

Widemouth Bay contains a number of popular holiday parks, situated with easy access to the sandy beach. This is a well-known tourist hot-spot, especially for surfers, yet few realise that it has spectacular geological features and yields a variety of Upper Carboniferous fossils.

 

Foxhole Point features the Crackington Measures, which continue from Widemouth Bay. While it is possible to walk here from Widemouth Bay, it is best accessed from the village of Millook to avoid a long walk over difficult terrain. Plant remains and goniatites can be found here from the Upper Carboniferous. 

 

Wanson Mouth is located just to the south of Widemouth Bay. It is a privately owned beach, but with public access permitted and no restrictions on collecting fossils. It is also a quick and easy site to access, with some excellent Upper Carboniferous fossils to be found, such as goniatites, ostracods, molluscs and worm tubes. 

 

Rusey Cliff is one of the few places in Cornwall where well-preserved fossils can be collected. Plant remains can be found in slabs of the Lower Carboniferous-aged Boscastle Formation, and corals, brachiopods and goniatites can be found in similar aged limestone rocks along the foreshore. The site can be accessed by walking along a cliff top footpath, which takes you through a large area of landslip.

 

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