Jump to content

Diaphus sp.

oilshale
Sign in to follow this  

Diaphus sp.

Lanternfish

Oligocene
Menilite Formation

Jamna Dolna
Poland

 


Sign in to follow this  

From the album

Vertebrates

  • 694 images
  • 3 comments
  • 508 image comments

Photo Information for Diaphus sp.

Taken with OLYMPUS IMAGING CORP. E-M5MarkII

  • 60 mm
  • 1/125
  • f f/2.8
  • ISO 320
View all photo EXIF information

3 Comments

Recommended Comments

Fossildude19

Posted

You have some wonderful fishes from Poland, Thomas!

Diaphus  is in the same order as Eomyctophum, right?  Myctophiformes

I can see some similarities between them. 

Great fossil!

Share this comment


Link to comment
oilshale

Posted

 Yep, family Myctophidae and order Myctophiformes.

But you have to be very careful. Some slabs - especially the very dark slabs from Jamna Dolna - are prone to pyrite desease / decay. If you can not keep the relative humidity below 40% (better 30%!), they start to rot and in a couple of years, they will look like this slab:

5e29b196f05f6_Pyriterot.thumb.jpg.6482aa199098fe521b6ce14828f54b75.jpg

 

After some painful losses I keep all my fossils from Poland in small plastic boxes with silica gel bags and some ammonium carbonate. Ammonium carbonate slowly degrades to gaseous ammonia and carbon dioxide - the Ammonia neutralizes the sulfuric acid that is formed by oxidation of pyrite and stops (or at least retards) the autocatalytic effect.

Share this comment


Link to comment
Fossildude19

Posted

You mentioned this once before, about the susceptibility of the darker shales to pyrite disease. 

Mine are kept in a cabinet in a dry area with silica gel bags. 

Share this comment


Link to comment
×