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oilshale

Diaphus sp.

Lanternfish

Oligocene
Menilite Formation

Jamna Dolna
Poland

 

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From the album:

Vertebrates

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Photo Information for Diaphus sp.

Taken with OLYMPUS IMAGING CORP. E-M5MarkII

  • 60 mm
  • 1/125
  • f f/2.8
  • ISO 320
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You have some wonderful fishes from Poland, Thomas!

Diaphus  is in the same order as Eomyctophum, right?  Myctophiformes

I can see some similarities between them. 

Great fossil!

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 Yep, family Myctophidae and order Myctophiformes.

But you have to be very careful. Some slabs - especially the very dark slabs from Jamna Dolna - are prone to pyrite desease / decay. If you can not keep the relative humidity below 40% (better 30%!), they start to rot and in a couple of years, they will look like this slab:

5e29b196f05f6_Pyriterot.thumb.jpg.6482aa199098fe521b6ce14828f54b75.jpg

 

After some painful losses I keep all my fossils from Poland in small plastic boxes with silica gel bags and some ammonium carbonate. Ammonium carbonate slowly degrades to gaseous ammonia and carbon dioxide - the Ammonia neutralizes the sulfuric acid that is formed by oxidation of pyrite and stops (or at least retards) the autocatalytic effect.

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You mentioned this once before, about the susceptibility of the darker shales to pyrite disease. 

Mine are kept in a cabinet in a dry area with silica gel bags. 

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