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horse (Equus) cannon bone
 
© Harry Pristis, 2019

horse (Equus) cannon bone


Harry Pristis

Left metacarpal II ("cannon bone") of an equus horse, with fused metacarpal IV ("splint bone").  Recovered in Dixie County, Florida.  Pleistocene.

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© Harry Pristis, 2019
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Can You tell me do I have a fossil from pleistocen? It isnt the same as yours on the picture but is near the same looks like...

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Harry Pristis

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It's an equus metapodial.

Briefly apply an open flame (I prefer a butane lighter) to an inconspicuous area of the object . . . you cannot keep a pin hot enough long enough to scorch collagen.  A 'burn test' or 'match test' will indicate whether there is collagen remaining in a bone -- scorched collagen has an awful, burnt-hair smell.  Collagen doesn't preserve well in a fossil, so no collagen to scorch means the bone is more likely to be a fossil.  Tooth enamel contains hydroxyapatite, but doesn't contain significant collagen, so the 'burn test' on tooth enamel would be a waste of time.

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