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Showing most informative content since 08/22/2018 in Posts

  1. 16 likes
    I didnt know where to post this? Its not prepped. It was just found, but sadly, not by me. I just wanted to show this to folks. Too cool not too. If its in the wrong place, please move it. Thanks. My best buddy goes to England every year to metal detect. He met my other buddy, Al Lang, whilst on one of those trips and they became freinds. I was just sent these photos this morning. Really really cool. I only wish that I could prep something like this. Supposed to be 19 Eurypterids on it. Just Wow!!! RB
  2. 16 likes
    Here are some pictures of some of the concretions that I collected. I shot these so you can see how they are found in the dirt and also in the shale. An opened Essexella asherae Jellyfish- My haul for the day-
  3. 14 likes
    This is a porcupine fish skeleton - those are the spines. If this is from NC, it is probably a striped burrfish (Chilomycterus schoepfi).
  4. 14 likes
    Hi all, Just thought I'd share my ichthyosaur which I discovered near Lyme Regis in Dorset, UK. Best fossil I've ever found! Cheers, Matt
  5. 13 likes
    While visiting family in Georgia, I decided to take my older brother on a Cambrian Bug Hunt. There is no better place to go than a little exposure in Murray County, Georgia that lies under a bridge and next to the beautiful Conasauga River. The Upper Cambrian (Aphelaspis Zone) trilobites found here include Aphelaspis brachyphasis, and Agnostoids, among others. This is a relatively small exposure and depending on the height of the river, it can make the exposure that much smaller or not accessible at all. I was down her in May on my way back from Sanibel Island and I was not able to collect due to river conditions. The other thing that is small with this site is parking, if cars are parked correctly, you can fit 2, but no more that that. I also collect early and leave as much room as possible for any other collectors. Here are a couple pictures of the collecting area and the steep and often slippery descent. We were were only able to stay for two hours due to the fact that my brother got injured, but I will touch on that at the end. Here are some of my finds, I also collected matrix to work on later. Aphlelaspis brachyphasis Aphelaspis brachyphasis and a Agnostoid portion. Besides the mudstone, trilobites are also found in a harder grey shale. Here is a very large portion I found on the ground ( 35 pounds) and I will work on this piece at home. As you can see, there are trilobites found in it and many times they have excellent preservation. One handy tool to have there is this folding hacksaw, it allows me to trim pieces in the field for easier storage. As I stated above, my brother had an accident, really a slip and fall. Besides watching how you go up and down to your car, you have to watch the loose matrix. He went to adjust how he was sitting and the loose matrix caused him to slip. It appears he broke or dislocated his left pinky finger and we left so he could go to Urgent Care. Be careful collecting anywhere.
  6. 13 likes
    More pics of my rex tooth
  7. 12 likes
    Today I went on the E.S.C.O.N.I. (Earth Science Club Of Northern Illinois) fossil collecting trip for Mazon Creek concretions to the Braceville Shaft Mine in Braceville, Illinois. It was a great day for the trip since it had rained recently and exposed a lot of concretions that made surface collecting great, that coupled with great overcast skies and temps in the upper 60's. It was a great day had by all and there must have been hundreds of concretions collected. Here is are a couple Aerial shots of the Shaft Mine. We met at 8 am and most people stayed until 2 pm. Most of the participants, about 40, have been to this site before and new what they were looking for. It great to see people drive as far away as Wisconsin and leave with some nice concretions. A couple hours into collecting, buckets of open concretions were dumped out so the participants could search through the pile and pull out what ever caught their fancy. I brought 3 bucket full of stuff to dump and Rich @stats brought a bucket full and I believe one other person brought some. Here are people from the group searching for some open concretions- there were concretions from Braceville, Pit 11(Essex Biota) and Pit 4 (Braidwood Biota) in the pile. It was great to meet Rich and a couple other Fossil Forum members-Ben @deutscheben and @Lisa102 or as she calls herself "Mud Girl"- . I know that their were other members in attendance, but I am notoriously bad at names and I apologize in advance. I usually never get in pictures, but I thought why not today- it was good day. Here I am with Rich @stats I am the one with the Snoopy bandana- I usually wear that on most fossil trips, but always backpacking, it is like a good luck charm. Here I am with Ben @deutscheben . Here is Lisa @Lisa102 , you can see why she calls herself "Mud Girl"- I give her huge "Props", she was always high up on the spoil pile and collecting some really nice concretions. I know this is Andy, but do not know his FF Tag. I am now going to group the rest of my pictures into 3 topics and I will start with pictures of the area. If you look at the first 2 pics, you can see pieces of boards sticking out, these are remnants of the mine (late 1890's ?) and maybe some trackways the were used by mules to pull out carts. One member found a horseshoe today that would have belonged to a mule. In years past, I also found similar horseshoes and old bottles. You get to the top by going up these gullies. It is important to look for concretions as you go up, because the rain causes them to roll down from the top- it is as just important to look for them on the way down, since a different perspective reveals more.
  8. 12 likes
    Here is a double header: a horn coral growing within a Syringopora sp. coral colony. I found this silicified coral combo is a chunk of Pennsylvanian Naco Limestone found in the mountains of east central Arizona. After dissolving the limestone in a 5% to 10% HCl acid solution, their true beauty was revealed. Found: Aug. 8, 2018. Horn coral growing in a colony of Syringopora sp. coral. Pennsylvanian Naco Limestone. NE Gila County, Arizona. See before and after prep photos.
  9. 12 likes
    Continuing with USA raptors, we have the classic Dromaeosaurus from Judith River Formation A rarely-seen Two Medicine Formation dromaeosaurid: A Canadian dromaeosaurid: Finally, the good ol' Moroccan raptor. Take note that dromaeosaurids aren't officially described in the Kem Kem Beds, and that specimen #2 and #3 could very well be indeterminate theropods.
  10. 11 likes
    About a month ago I went to Penn with two fossil buddies and they both found prone greenops. Sadly I did not find one. However both of these greenops were split between the positive and negative and probably were missing some skin as the material was quite flaky. For one of my friends this was his first ever find of a prone greenops. Prone greenops that are nicely laid out are a very rare find in the Windom shale. Most of the ones I have found from there or others that I have prepped for people are fully, partially enrolled or distorted. So to my fossil buddy this was a bit of a special find. We wrapped up the two pieces in tin foil in the field and I agreed to take it with me and prep it for him. Well zoom ahead a month in time and I am going out with him last week to collect and he asks how is his greenops coming, whereby I realize that I have not only not started it ,but in my senility had forgotten I had it and had no clue where it was. Well when I got home it turns out that I had never unpacked the bucket of fossils from that trip and low and behold his fossil was packed just as we had left it. A careful look at both parts under the scope confirmed my opinion that the bug was in pretty rough shape , but a prone greenops, not to mention perhaps his first ever prone warranted we attempt to bring it back to life. Unfortunately I did not take any pics until a ways into the prep but here is what I did to start. 1. Washed the mud off both plates scrubbing with a tooth brush 2. Squared up what would become the fossil plate with the diamond gas saw 3. Cut out as small as possible a square from the top piece of the matrix that contained the top part of the greenops using my 7 inch tile saw with diamond blade 4. On a belt sander using aluminum oxide 120 grit thinned the top piece as much as safely possible to help minimize my prep time later. 5. Using super thin cyanoacrylate glue reattached the top portion to the main slab clamping tightly with a c-clamp. Asusual all prep was done under a zoom scope at 10x to 20x magnification using a Comco abrasion unit and in this case a German Pferd MST 31 scribe exclusively.. Not a lot of scribing was done other than to outline the bug as the skin was not in great shape. Abrasion was pretty much done with a .18 and .10 nozzle using 40 micron previously used dolomite at 30 PSI. Here is the bug after about an our of prepping . I have outlined in red where you can still see the outline of the section that was glued down. A lot of people do not realize that many of the fantastic trilobites you see on the market have actually been glued back together because the splits are often through the bug. I once did a Moroccan trilobite that was in 7 pieces when I received it Here is the bug after another 40 minutes Took some pictures of the prep but frankly they ended up too blurry to use so here is the prep after abrasion is complete and after I have repaired a lot of the parts that broke of in the split. I tend to use a white repair material and always take a picture to let the owner know what has been repaired Here is the bug after coloration applied . The repairs were allowed to cure overnight before coloration and a bit of extra carving to clean up spots.Just waiting for me to do a final cleanup tomorrow after everything has cured a bit more. A long way from being the worlds most pristine or perfect bug but I am relatively pleased that we were able to breath some new life into an ailing bug. Totally prep time about 3 1/2 hours over 4 days. I suspect the owner will be pleased with the result. I have seen people toss bugs in the field that were in this type of shape. For those of you who just need to know the bug is 27mm x 18 mm A slightly different view
  11. 11 likes
    Fast. Intelligent. Deadly. The "Raptor" is perhaps one of the most famous dinosaur today thanks to Jurassic Park. To many people's surprise however, raptors are heavily feathered and nimbler than movies would have you believe. The Jurassic Park Velociraptor was merely the size of coyote in real life! In fact, their proper family name is 'Dromaeosaurid'. The largest species was Utahraptor, and it grew to the size of a grizzly bear! Dromaeosaurid fossils have been found all over the world. They first appeared during the Cretaceous, though isolated teeth have been found in the mid-Jurassic. Allow me to present my humble collection of Dromaeosaurid teeth. First up, from Cloverly Formation, one of my pride and joy from @hxmendoza A dromaeosaurid from Aguja Formation. I am seeing more Aguja fossils showing up, but dromaeosaurid teeth are still rare. Now, for the dromaeosaurids from the famous Hell Creek Formation. Some of them probably lived alongside T. rex. A big shout-out for @Troodon for getting me started on dromaeosaurids with this very first Acheroraptor!
  12. 11 likes
  13. 10 likes
    Toys to distract the kids with. Some of these toys have been with me since I was 7. So glad to see them being played with by other children today. A diorama in my room: As always it was an awesome day. I am already looking forward to the next meet-up. If any of you pass by Singapore, don't hesitate to ring us up! See you next year!
  14. 10 likes
    Hi guys, last week I was on holiday in Austria and had the chance to hunt at the area of Adnet. There you can find fossils in the red "Adneter Schichten" which are lower jurassic deposits. I was there twice for about 4 hours at all and I found some cool stuff! At my first visit I found plenty of ammonites, one nautilus and some bivalves. It was a very rainy day. Here is a picture of the site: And this is the only ammonite I could prepped until now: Its a 5 cm long Phylloceras. A kinda common species there. The prep work is really difficult, because there is no really separation layer between stone and fossil. I didnt prepped the nautilus until now so I can you show a picture of the unprepped example: On my second visit the weather was very good (maybe even too hot ). Because of that and because of the enormous luck I had I found some shark teeth I didnt really expect to find one although I had already saw some teeth from there on the internet. But I didnt found one I found many Here are the 4 nicest ones until now: The first one is very fragile and 1 cm long: The second shark tooth is about 2 cm long and I like the combination with a crinoid stem: Then this one is about 1.2 cm long and seems to be only a fragment. But I still like it And last but not least the find of the day: A 2.6 cm long shark tooth!! I will try to take better pictures of last and biggest shark tooth after cutting the stone a bit smaller. At the moment the tooth is on a huge stone! The prep work on the shark teeth was also very hard because the teeth are very fragile and the stone is very hard. I prepped it with different needles and with my air scribe I am very pleased with those finds I assume that all shark teeth are Sphenodus shark teeth. Thanks for watching! Hope you enjoyed
  15. 10 likes
    It was a pretty good week fossil collecting I managed to make it to Penn Dixie Tuesday and Friday. A few of us Canadians had the place to ourselves both days Tuesday was an interesting day, three of us went Mike, Greg and myself and we all ended up with heat stroke. The temperature topped out at 39 Celsius and then you add in the humidity factor and it was low 40's. Stupid weather for collecting but we all found some very good stuff. Greg found a huge plate that I cut down in the field for him to about 12 inches by 12 inches. It would appear to have 4 complete prone E. rana on it . It currently sits in my basement waiting to be prepped. I do not have a picture as of yet but if I get his permission I will post one. Mike as usual is the greenops whisperer and he found 2 or 3 relatively complete and large greenops at the top of the blocks in the main Penn trilobite layer. I was having a reasonable day I probably had 20 to 30 enrolled or partially enrolled trilobites in the bucket along with a very nice Pleurodictyum americanum (a tabulate coral) . I only find a few of these each year at Penn and always take them home because they prep up quite nicely. I was getting a bit frustrated that both Mike and Greg were finding prone rana's including Greg's spectacular plate, when my fortunes changed with one split of the rock. For those of you that have been collecting with me you know that my style is to spend the morning breaking out huge blocks from the main trilobite layer with big prybars, wedges and chisels and then I split for the whole afternoon. We were working a large bench and had gotten to the state where all the blocks were locked in because of convoluted dome structures and the lack of natural cracks. The blocks that day were coming out about 200 to 300 pounds and about 12 to 18 inches thick. Eventually I would resort to the diamond gas saw and create some weak areas that we could exploit, but back to this story. In frustration with the heat and three guys not being able to get the next block out I just took a chisel and a 5 pound mini sledge and took my frustration out on the rock. Well to my pleasant surprise off popped a piece of matrix that clearly had 2 nice bugs in it. Wow one strike of the sledge and the fortunes of the day are totally changed. I always tell people who are collecting with me to keep at it, your are only one strike of the hammer away from having an amazing day. Unfortunately I did not take any pictures in the field my phone would not let me it said the battery was over heated. Here is ta picture of the shard about 1/2 hour into prepping. What you cant notice in this picture is that there is a 3rd bug buried to the left, I was just able to see the edge of a pygidium from the side. For once I got lucky and it was not just an isolated pygidium. Here it is probably an hour into the prep Prep was pretty standard using a COMCO air abrasion unit at about 30 PSI with 40 micron previously used dolomite, utilizing .025. .015 and .010 tips. Very little scribing was used on the piece because was quite thin and looked to have weak spots that were stabilized with cyanoacrylate and dilute vinac in acetone .Anyway for your viewing pleasure here is a series of pictures of the completed bugs. The plate has no repairs or restoration and the bugs are lying in their original positions. Going into my collection besides the "Perfect Bug" I found earlier this season.
  16. 10 likes
    I periodically get asked about smaller theropod teeth so this is what I know. If you have additional tooth related information please pass it on. Tanycolagreus topwilsoni The holotype included a fragmented skull with one premaxillary and two lateral teeth. Unfortunately the teeth were crushed with no visible serrations so its unknown how to describe them. Holotype skull Reconstruction Skull of Marshosaurus from Utah Museum of Natural History. So you can see variation of the teeth in jaw If you are interested in finding out more about Holotype skeleton this book is the best around. Carpenter, K., Miles, C., and Cloward, K. (2005). "New small theropod from the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation of Wyoming." in Carpenter, K. 2005. The Carnivorous Dinosaurs, Indiana University Press: 23-48 Koparion douglassi Oldest known Troodontid and only known from a single maxillary tooth. Picture says it all. A tooth taxon! Scale: A 1 mm, B-F 100 micrometers Chure, D. J. (1994). "Koparion douglassi, a new dinosaur from the Morrison Formation (Upper Jurassic) of Dinosaur National Monument; the oldest troodontid (Theropoda: Maniraptora)." Brigham Young University Geology Studies, 40: 11-15 Coelurus fragilis Known from a fairly complete skeleton however there is a question if the dentary, below, belongs to the skeleton. No teeth were recovered and cannot find any additional information on teeth. Ken Carpenter recently responded to my inquiry about these teeth. He stated that we have no teeth from this dinosaur. Teeth have been called Coelurus because they are small but there is no proof of association Carpenter, K., Miles, C., and Cloward, K. (2005). "New small theropod from the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation of Wyoming." in Carpenter, K. 2005. The Carnivorous Dinosaurs, Indiana University Press: 23-48 Ornitholestes hermanni Skull with both mandibles are part of the holotype. Osborn et. al (1917) paper just comments that the teeth are small and feeble. Carpenters book mentions that the skull is presently being studied by Mark Norell Carpenter, K., Miles, C., and Cloward, K. (2005). "New small theropod from the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation of Wyoming." in Carpenter, K. 2005. The Carnivorous Dinosaurs, Indiana University Press: 23-48 Reconstructed Skull AMNH Osborn, Henry Fairfield (1917). "Skeletal adaptations of Ornitholestes, Struthiomimus, Tyrannosaurus". Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History. 35 (43): 733–771. hdl:2246/1334. Allosaurus Needs to be developed, in the queue Torvosaurus Ceratosaurus Marshosaurus
  17. 10 likes
    As far as I know, only a single piece of fossil shed snake skin has been found. It was found in a piece of amber from Myanmar. This amber is about 99,6 million years old. There is also a more complete fossil of a snake been found in Myanmar, but only about 4 cm of the backpart of the snake, so no skull has been found in amber.
  18. 9 likes
    I hadn't seen an echinoid with beekite before so I had to buy it. Micraster glyphus?, Campanian, Höver, Germany.
  19. 9 likes
    Nice surprise today. Only my 2nd Plesiosaur vert in my first 4 years. Ive got about 150-1 ratio Mosasaur to Plesiosaur verts. It’s small but in great condition North Texas Late Cretaceous 86-90 mya
  20. 9 likes
    I had to rest up for 5 days after this trip. My health isn't what it used to be and this trip kicked my you know what! Had an absolute freakin good time though! Made some new freinds also, been a long time since that has happened. I did very little actual fossil hunting. I did end up in a ditch looking for crab concretions, found none and had to crawl out on my hands and knee's just to get out of the ditch and back onto the road. Before this stroke thing, I could have simply walked up and out of that ditch like it was nothing, but it was sooooooooo nice to be outdoors again! Dont you fellow fossil hunters ever take your health for granted!!! I did get some crab concs but I had to buy them. Luckily I have friends in Washington. I also met up with a guy that I found on the internet and had a really great time with him and bought and traded for some agatized Aturia and agatized clams. Some really beautiful stuff!!! And to top it all off, I came home with a trailer full of wood to use in my smoker. Luckily my middle son came with me and did most of the work. Made for a most wonderful trip. Oh, also, whilst at my buddy's house he gave me a broken open crab concretion that he didnt want. It does need some repair, but if it has legs, it will be a good crab. RB
  21. 9 likes
    For several reasons I would not purchase these- I think they are very good fakes or composites. 1- The matrix does not look right for eggs of this type from China or Mongolia (the only places these are found). 2- The eggs are too perfect to be left with their bottom halves stuck in matrix which leads me to believe the shell was placed there by man. If the top portion of the eggs look this good with this amount of inflation there is a good chance the bottom portion would be just as good. Hatching windows of this type are not typically seen as taking the egg and cutting it in half longways as these are presented. If these were real and prepped like this then the preparer would know that if he were to free the eggs of all its matrix and was in this good of condition then they would be worth around $3k for each egg, significantly more than the asking price! 3- The third reason...if you're interested to know please PM me! STAY AWAY!
  22. 9 likes
    I thought I’d post some of my favorite claws from my collection. I’m curious what people think about my ID on one of them and I have no idea what the last one is. ID help with that one would be great! (All measurements are straight line) Spinosaurus hand claw 4 1/2” Kem Kem Beds, Morocco Repairs, but I see no restoration Acheroraptor Temerytorum foot walking claw 1 7/8” Hell Creek Carter County, Montana No repair or restoration (at first). However, the tip broke off during molding and it was lost. 1/16” restoration done to the tip now Two Acheroraptor killing claws. The larger one is 3 1/8” and the smaller is 1 9/16” Hell Creek Powder River County, Montana Large claw has restoration to the top 1/4” of the articulation end and 3/4” to the tip Smaller claw has restoration on 5/8” of the tip Same claw as above, with size perspective Other side... Acheroraptor Temertyorum digit I hallux claw 7/8” Hell Creek Slope County, North Dakota No repair or restoration Acheroraptor Temertyorum hand claw 1 1/4” Hell Creek Powder River County, Montana Restoration to 1/2” of the tip I originally thought this this was a Pachycephalosaurus claw, but Troodon’s posting on TFF makes me now believe it’s Thescelosaurus Hell Creek Powder River County, Montana No repair or restoration Side view.. Troodontid walking foot claw 1 1/16” Hell Creek Wibeaux County, Montana Looks like restoration to 1/4” of the tip Possible Microraptorine hand claw 5/8” Hell Creek Carter County, Montana Small amount of restoration to the top of the articulating end and 1/8” of the tip Same claw... Microraptorine killing claw. Related to Hesperonychus sp. 7/8” Hell Creek South Dakota Restoration to 3/16” of the tip Same claw for size comparison... Curious what people think of this one.. I believe it to be a Troodontid killing claw 3/4” Two Medicine Formation Unfortunately, no locality info on it Looks like the tip was glued back on, but no restoration Other side... Now I have no clue what this could be and I’d love some help. I bought it as a new collector awhile ago with very little knowledge. It was sold as a baby Anzu foot claw and the seller said Black Hills Museum ID’d it. I think it’s actually mammalian. Any thoughts? Size comparison Articulating end (sorry for the poor pics)
  23. 9 likes
    Specimen C Matrix: 29cm I have not washed this specimen yet, because it seems to be one of the best of the bunch in some ways, and I am wary of causing damage. The break between the two halves shows no evidence of fakery whatsoever, just one area which has been glued. The whole thing appears to be genuine rock, in sharp contrast to specimen B [Edit to add: Some parts of the very bottom and edges of the matrix are made of resin. The details themselves also look largely genuine, with just a few smears of modelling clay on top of them. Sections of the cephalon and head sheild seem to be missing and replaced. Interestingly, even apparently original sections of the thorax with clearly visible pleural segmentation have been crudely re-enforced with scratches. There's no logical reason for this, since it doesn't improve the aethetics one iota, and I can only assume that this was part of a production-line process where someone just did what he thought he was supposed to do. I'm not sure how much of the cephalon is original, although hints of the original head shield are visible beneath the clay used to 'improve' it. Example of scratches intentionally made during prep This is my approximate interpretation of which parts of this trilobite are genuine. I am unsure about the cephalon. I don't like the look of it, on the whole, but some of it may be genuine and covered in clay. Note how the orange pigment extends beyond the bounds of the trilobite. That's it! If anyone has anything to add, then please let me know. I am undecided yet as to what my next course of action will be - I may attempt to remove all of the restoration from one of these pieces, and see what's left, and certainly they would all benefit from at least some cleaning up.
  24. 9 likes
    I understand what the Admins are saying, but aren't we looking for the best of the best? The Fossil Of The Year may end up being a landslide victory. Personal i think losing gives most of us more drive or incentive to read about possible new spots, learn, make new connections and ultimately find GREAT specimens truly worthy of "praise". But this is just my opinion.
  25. 9 likes
    Pictures of the bony fish vertebrae: Marco Sr.
  26. 9 likes
    You know, as funny as these satirical threads are, what is obviously a fake to many of us, might not be as obvious to others. I think it's important we keep education in mind when we talk about fake fossils. These monstrosities are sadly all too common. Perhaps pointing out which, even the obvious ones, are fake and how one can tell might be more useful than simple ridicule.
  27. 9 likes
    Some cool dino material Tom Holt's presents this small Troodontid from Mei long Also Ornithomimid skulls and Gorgosaurus below at Tyrrell Stu Pond shows us the hand of NHMUK R5764. the holotype of Mantellisaurus atherfieldensis, with their distinctive thumb spikes. Mateusz Wosik shows us teeth likely belonging to the Tyrannosaurid, Bistahieversor, from western New Mexico. WOW João Vasco Leite shows us this specimen which is the solo holotype bone, metacarpal I, of Rapator ornitholestoides, a theropod from Australia, housed at NHM London
  28. 9 likes
    There is a possibility that this could be an Upper Devonian sponge, Ceratodictya annulata.
  29. 9 likes
    A very informative journal from the Utah Geological Association that focuses on ornithischian dinosaurs from the Morrison Formation which form only about 15% of the dinosaur specimens recovered. What is key for those familar with this assemblage is that this article demonstrates that Nanosaurus agilis is the senior name for Drinker nisti, Othnielosaurus consors, and Othnielia rex. Four valid genera and six species are present: Fruitadens haagaroum, Nanosaurus agilis, Camptosaurus dispar, C. aphanoecetes, Dryosaurus altus, and D. elderae https://www.utahgeology.org/publication/a-photo-documentation-of-bipedal-ornithischian-dinosaurs-from-the-upper-jurassic-morrison-formation-usa/ For tooth lovers @hxmendoza
  30. 8 likes
    2012 Gathering 2013 Gathering 2014 Gathering 2015 Gathering 2016 Gathering 2017 Gathering 1 2017 Gathering 2 Hi everyone, the Singapore Fossils Collector had our annual meet-up recently. As usual, there was food, laughter and lots of new faces! First up, an overview of my room's collections:
  31. 8 likes
    The Middle Devonian fossils of New York State are well known and have been for over 100 years. I grew up in Livingston County in whats called the Genesee River Valley. The streams that feed this river within the county are rich in Devonian fossils. I collect fossil corals, brachiopods, bryozoans, crinoids&blastoids, pelecypods, gastropods, cephalopods, phyllocarids, trilobites, fish, and wood. I rearranged my favorites in my collection and thought I would share since I feel the display will remain like this for some time. Out of the thousands of Middle Devonian fossils I have collected in 30+ years, these are the ones that mean the most to me. Thanks, Mikeymig
  32. 8 likes
    Today I spent a few hours collecting at the Lawrenceburg, Indiana Road Cut. Here are a couple of finds- cephalopods, gastropods, brachiopods and trilo-bits.
  33. 8 likes
    Hello TFF members, I got out for a very, very hot fossil hunting trip the other day and a managed to find a few small megalodon shark teeth, snaggletooth teeth, a three-toed horse tooth and bone and a bunch of other cool stuff. The only way I could bare the heat was to dip my shirt into the water and put it against my back in between every single screen. And if you don't want to watch the vid and/or can't see the thumbnail, here's a closeup of some of the highlights from the hunt: -Cris
  34. 8 likes
    I just got back from a week-long trip that included a stop to dig Green River fish at the American Fossil Quarry outside of Kemmerer, Wyoming. That was a successful venture and I will post a separate entry showing some of my finds once I get them unpacked. While I was there, I stopped in at the nearby Fossil Butte National Monument. In the visitor center, one of the rangers was doing a demo of prepping a Green River fish (a Diplomystus from the 18" layer they got from one of the commercial quarries). I didn't take any photos but I did ask a lot of questions. Before I share his answers, you might want to take a look at this video from the Fossil Butte National Monument website. It shows how they prep the fish using an air scribe and air abrasive. But be warned that what I learned isn't exactly the same as what is shown in the video here: https://www.nps.gov/media/video/view.htm?id=9BD712EE-1DD8-B71B-0B88EC525E86D328 The setup I saw was the same as in the video. It looked like a home-made blast cabinet with a sheet of acrylic plastic on top, held on by blue painters tape. It was connected to a good dust collector. The microscope, as in the video, looked like a Leica-Wild M8 stereomicroscope with a video camera on top and an offset binocular viewing head. This is a top-of-the-line unit that probably cost somewhere between $7,000 to $10,000 (sadly, this model microscope is no longer manufactured, but you can pick them up on the used market if you have enough money). The microscope seemed to be fixed in the center of the blast cabinet, you move the specimen around under it. I didn't learn the make of the air scribe tool he was using, he said it was a specially modified one with a large rubber sheath that reduced the vibration transmitted to his hands. For the air abrasive, they had two Crystal Mark Swam Blasters model EV-2. One of them, set off to the side and not being used, was labeled "Dolomite." I asked him what abrasive he was using and he said iron powder. I was surprised because I thought that would be much too hard on these fossils, but as I watched on the screen it did a great job of removing the matrix without damaging the fossil. I probed some more and he said that while the machine could be set to go up to 80 psi, he had it set to 13.3 psi. There is also a setting for powder flow that can be set between 1 and 10. He had it set to 6, and when he is doing delicate work on the fins, turns it down to 2 or 3. He also said the nozzle was specially modified to be smaller in diameter. I was pretty impressed with the quality of his work and am inspired to make my own blast cabinet similar to theirs (but without the high-priced microscope). I thought everyone might like to know what works for this facility even though it's different from what is usually recommended here on this forum.
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    The winner of the August 2018 IPFOTM goes to... the Horn Coral growing in a colony of Syringopora sp. coral from the Pennsylvanian Naco Limestone of NE Gila County, Arizona, USA! Congratulations to @DPS Ammonite!
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    Found a big tooth in nice condition today in north central Texas. Late Cretaceous, 86-90 mya
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    @Cris and I went to a brand new, unexplored site for us the other day, and it was definitely promising! We grabbed the canoe and went in a small, swampy creek. After lifting the canoe over what seemed like hundreds of log jams, we finally ended up finding some gravel! Sure enough, the gravel contained some fossils and we freaked out! Nothing insane was found this time, but we believe there is some amazing potential. We'll be heading back to this site for more exploration very soon!
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    And last but not least, some more pics of the participants. Some more pics of Ben and his dad- Ben's dad walking the Concretion Tightrope. Other ESCONI members- A couple little members enjoying the day. Rich and Andy making the movie "Holes 2"- and I believe that is Larry supervising. Lisa finding a great concretion up near the top. Laying down on the job and how to get down from the top, Water Park way- by sliding and letting the loose dirt carry you to the bottom.
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    Any day out on the river is a great day but today was something special, plentiful teeth and a couple of rarities! My wife started the day off right by finding a symphyseal cow shark tooth, I still can't hardly believe that she found it! Later on I stepped over a log to find a Meg leaning up against another log. Later on in the day, my daughters were hunting together and when I got home and checked out what they found, there was an Alopias grandis there! I finished the day off by spying a 2 1/2" Mako sitting high and dry...I couldn't ask for a better day on the river with my family! Total haul. Definite trip maker here! I was very pleased with this! My wife was not going to be outdone and found her own. Of course my kids got into the action as well. I closed out the day with this beauty.
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    Lovenechinus lacazei (Julien) (most likely this species but I'm not sure if there's really enough diagnostic detail). Lower Carboniferous, probably Tournaisian. Very rare anyway but of especial interest as it is from the Jurassic Doulting Stone (Bajocian, Inferior Oolite) of Somerset, UK. This is a limestone full of Carboniferous detritus, formed when the Jurassic sea was washing up against the Mendip Hills Carboniferous high ground. (Just acquired via a dealer from an old collection that included Carboniferous coral and crinoid fragments from the same location. No other echinoids though!) 2.3cm across
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    You appear to have a very nice Knightia alta. Skip the glue and brush the critter with very dilute PVA. Search the Forum for "PVA" and "fish prep." You will find tons of opinions and some practical advice. Check out the fossil preparation topic especially. Good luck, have fun. @Ptychodus04
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    An acquaintance I was in school with many years ago in Jasper, Alberta still lives there and is an avid hiker, outdoorsman (woman). She never stops and her frequent forays along the trails and not-so-trails in Jasper National Park have rewarded her with unequaled memories. This is a photo she took of a large chunk of coral twice the size of her hiking boot as she was hiking in the Opal Hills in the Medicine Lake area of Jasper National Park. She isn't allowed to remove anything so there it sits, awaiting the next intrepid adventurer to follow her path. Beautiful.
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    I think Kevin has it right. I think this is a partial diodontid upper -- the grinding mill portion of the mouthpart. The beak portion is missing.
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    Beyond carcharhiniform and non-carcharhiniform, I'm not sure how to tell separate genuses apart from one another. Unless I'm missing something, I don't see the septa that would indicate a non-carcharhiniform (lamniform) vert, so that leaves it as a carchariniform type, of which Hemipristis is a member, along with tigers, lemons, bulls, duskies and all the other ground sharks -dozens of species overall. There would need to be a lot of comparative measurements taken to narrow it down.
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    One if my favorite and cool dinosaur groups are alvarezsaurian with their unique forelimb. Here we have two new species being described from the early cretaceous of China, Xiyunykus pengi and Bannykus wulatensis. https://www.cell.com/current-biology/fulltext/S0960-9822(18)30987-4#.W370yzRIRZ4.twitter One of the first informational Topics I put together
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    My entry for this month: found on August 18 2018: Hemipneustes striatoradiatus Maastrichtian Eben-Emaal ( Belgium ) In situ: after cleanup:
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    I believe the large one is a Knightia alta, given the size of it's belly. Small one could be Knightia eocaena: This one is for @GeschWhat These are just a sampling of what we collected. Plenty of prep work left to do, which will keep me busy for awhile.
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    I took delivery of this jaw today. I bought it over the weekend, having seen it and been offered a reasonable price on it. The initial pictures I saw were of very poor quality (the one above is mine), and it looked relatively convincing. In further photos, it also looked pretty convincing. The seller, I should point out, was not an expert or commercial seller, he was someone who'd bought it a few years ago and now wanted rid of it. Some of you are probably looking at the photo above and thinking to yourselves 'that's not at all convincing, what were you thinking?', and you'd be right to think that, since all of the teeth are fake (or rather, the roots are fake and the crowns were composited in). I've been collecting these jaws for several years, and I really should have known better. Dodgy photos or not, something doesn't look right about the alignment of the teeth or the shape of the roots. I let my enthusiasm get the better of me, as a result of which I splurged money I could ill-afford on something which is mostly faked. The jaw bone is entirely real, but there's not an awful lot of jaw to speak of. That said, it wasn't very expensive and is, if nothing else, an interesting piece of ethnographic art, and far better than those dismal $25 fakes that you see everywhere. One of the things that helped convince me was the tooth on the far left, which I felt looked quite realistic: The teeth on the right are less so, with roots which bulge in every direction, which appear to end at the point where they touch the matrix, and which in one area appear to be smudged on top of the jaw bone. They aren't the worst fakes I have ever seen, but they aren't great either. Up close they appear to be the usual mix of brown-ish plaster and sand. I post this as a warning, really. If you're ever unsure, post it here before buying, if only for a sanity check. You don't necessarily need to be a newbie to make a newbie error (although it helps if, like me, you're an idiot).
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    Neither a rugose coral nor a bryozoan are likely to be found in an Eocene freshwater lake deposit. My first impression is of a partial winged seed (samara) or flower petal. The veination is more consistent with the latter. Don
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    Hi I got my winnings off@Monica and Viola today . Sorry I am going to hijack this thread a little (but we all like looking at Hash plate). I am really happy with all my prizes and the lovely art too. I think Monica you gave me my first Canadian fossil. The Hash plates are stunning. Thank you both so much. Is this a tiny belemnite ?
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