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Showing most informative content since 11/16/2017 in Posts

  1. 17 likes
    First up, the seller of this egg stated upfront this is a replica, so this isn't a scam warning. Here, we have an oviraptor egg that could fool even experienced collectors. It looks realistic because it's made out of real oviraptor eggshells. It's even covered with a coating of matrix. This is common practice; I've seen hadrosaur eggs are faked this way, with plaster mixed in to make the egg seem round and heavy. For reference, here's a real Oviraptor (Elongatoolithus sp.) that's been professionally prepped. Oviraptor eggs are commonly faked, so four ways to get a real one is: 1) Get a prepped one, preferably with matrix removed. The eggshell should be black 2) Avoid eggs that are perfect. Real eggs have cracks, and sometimes missing entire chunks of shells. 3) Get one without a matrix base. This isn't a sure-fire method, but I've noticed many fake oviraptor eggs have matrix bases, whereas I can't say the same of those free of matrix. Perhaps the fake eggs require a matrix base for support during their construction process. 4) Price. Again, this is arguable, but the real Oviraptor eggs I've seen often comes with price tag several times that of dubious ones. Having sent some eggs for prepping in the past, this is justified because the cost and time of prepping may cost more than the actual egg. Some scammers like to lure people in with bargain prices. Chinese eggs flood the market, and for many collectors, a dinosaur egg is a must-have. There are more fakes than there are real ones, so take extra care if you seek to buy one. As always, if you're unsure, post pictures here and we will try to help.
  2. 13 likes
    See below from Welton 1993: Your tooth is probably Orthodont and you are seeing the pulp cavity exposed because of tooth damage. Marco Sr.
  3. 12 likes
    I know there have been several threads on TFF that talk about storage cabinets for fossils, but since they are all a bit old I will start a new one to describe the storage cabinet I am in the process of making. It's not done yet but I thought I would show progress as I make it. A few things about the design. First, I wanted it to look at least somewhat presentable so I wouldn't have to stash it in some out-of-the-way location in our house. To keep the cost down I am going with oak-veneer plywood for the outside case, not solid oak. I'm using ordinary sanded plywood for the drawers, with solid oak dress panels at the front. The overall dimensions were driven by a couple of factors. First, I don't own a table saw or miter saw, so it had to be something I could make by just using my handheld circular saw. (I use a guide to make long straight cuts.) Also, I don't have a pickup truck so I had to have the 4x8 plywood sheets cut in half at Home Depot so they would fit in my SUV. That limited the maximum dimension to somewhat under 48" (Home Depot saw cuts are pretty atrocious on plywood). I decided to go with a design that had 10 drawers whose inside dimensions are 20x17". The lower two drawers are an inch taller than the rest. I also decided to use drawer slides for a smoother operation when opening the drawers. That meant the overall cabinet design was just about 36" high by 24" wide by 20" deep. Since I'm an engineer by training I felt it necessary to design the entire thing in Visio and use an Excel spreadsheet to calculate the dimensions of each piece, taking into account the exact measured thicknesses of the plywood. Here's what the design looks like: I've been leisurely working on building it for the last couple of weeks and estimate I still have about a week to go. Here's what it looks like so far: Partially assembled, held together by clamps and screws: Drawer design. Note that I have done a somewhat unusual design. Instead of using 1/4" hardboard that is held to the sides by dado cuts (which would be OK if the drawer was for storing lighter things like clothes or towels), I used much more solid 1/2" plywood screwed to the sides. You might question this design, but look closely at the drawer slides and you will see they have "L" shaped ledges that screw to the underside of the drawers. So the drawer slides are supporting the drawers by their bottoms, not their sides. This design is better for holding heavy objects like fossils. To keep the cost down I used inexpensive drawer slides rated for 50lbs each, which should be sufficient for the invertebrate fossils I collect. Now I need to finish gluing and ATTACHING all the sides together, add the top, install the dress panels around the top and bottom, cover the screw holes with wood plugs, cut the drawer dress panels to final size and mount them, stain everything, and add a clear polyurethane coat to finish it off. Should be done by Christmas.
  4. 12 likes
    Posted are a few concerns I found wandering through the internet. These are but a few examples of the type of issues you may encounter. I send this out as a reminder if you're shopping for fossil presents of any kind. Sellers mis-identify material simply through lack of knowledge but it's up to the buyer to know what they are looking at. Don't hesitate to post interests BEFORE you buy. BUYER BEWARE when it comes to fossils of any kind. Seller wants huge money for this Saurolophus osborni lower arm from the Two Medicine Formation. Looks like a nice arm but some of his facts are incorrect. This species is not found in the Campanian of the Two Medicine Formation but the early Maastrichtian age of the Horseshoe Canyon Formation. Another key point is that it's very difficult to determine taxons from post cranial bones of Hadrosaurs especially in an fauna where multiple species exist. Nice lower arm from somewhere and from some unknown Hadrosaur. What's this seller thinking the "2 Medicine Man Formation" really attention to detail not one of his strong points. Someone tell him its the Two Medicine Formation. Maybe he watches lots of Westerns Seller describes this as Pachycephalosaurus in my opinion it's Thescelosaurus Seller is properly describing this beautiful jaw as Ornithischian but in detail description adds that it was discovered where many Pachycephalosaurus fossils were found giving one the impression it's Pachy. In my opinion it's Thescelosaurus. Teeth of these two species look similar inquire before you buy. I see a lot of these being offered or sale, nice Christmas gift. For those of you that are new to collecting the only thing real here are the crowns. Nice gift Seller is offering this Claw and Identifying it as Velociraptor from the Hell Creek Formation. It's a very worn Anzu wyliei hand claw.
  5. 10 likes
    This appears to be a juvenile domestic pig maxilla, with the first adult tooth (m1) already erupted.
  6. 10 likes
    So, lets figure out vertebrae from the Kem Kem beds. As many of you know the Kem Kem beds has a pretty enigmatic palaeo fauna. There is some literature about it, but not a whole lot. Some of it is behind a paywall and much information is pretty scattered. So I got this idea that maybe we could combine our knowledge and information to collectively get a better picture of which bone belongs to which animal, in this case, vertebrae. I know some of you have some fantastic specimens in your collections, if we combine these in this thread we might be able to see some patterns. We probably won't be able to put a genus or species name on each type, but perhaps assigning certain vertebrae to a morphotype might be possible. With that I encourage everyone that has any vertebrae from the Kem Kem beds to share photos of their specimens and post them here so we can use this thread as a sort of library as well as an ID thread that everyone can use to better ID their Kem Kem vertebrae. So please, share your photos! And it might help to number your specimens for easier reference. I will be updating this first post as new information arises with examples to make ID easier. Theropods Spinosaurus aegyptiacus Spinosaurus is known for it's tall neural spines, which are pretty characteristic. Unlike Sigilmassasaurus, Spinosaurus does not have the ventral triangular rough plateau on the centra Spinosaurus cervical vertebrae Spinosaurus dorsal, sacral and caudal vertebrae Sigilmassasaurus brevicollis Sigilmassasaurus is a Spinosaurid that might be closely related to Baryonyx and Suchomimus. It differs from Spinosaurus in that it has a ventral keel on many vertebrae and a triangular rough plateau on the bottom back end. A is Sigilmassasaurus, B is Baryonyx Sigilmassasaurus cervical vertebrae Sigilmassasaurus dorsal vertebrae Indeterminate Spinosaurid vertebrae Not a whole lot has been published yet, so some bones can probably not be ID'd on genus level. Spinosaurid caudal vertebrae From Paleoworld-101's collection Charcharodontosaurids Due to an old paper Sigilmassasaurus vertebrae are sometimes misidentified as Carcharodontosaurid. These vertebrae should be identified on the basis of the original description by Stromer. Carcharodontosaurid cervical vertebrae Abelisaurids examples needed Deltadromeus agilis better examples needed Sauropods Rebbachisaurus garasbae Not a whole lot is known about this titanosaur, as only a few bones have been found. Notice that the vertebrae are very extensively pneumaticised. Rebbachisaurus dorsal vertebrae Unnamed Titanosaurian mid caudal vertebra Crocodiles more examples needed Kemkemia This crocodile is only known by a single terminal caudal vertebra. Kemkemia caudal vertebra Turtles examples needed Pterosaurs Azhdarchids Azhdarchid (probably Alanqa) posterior fragment cervical vertebra Azhdarchid Mid cervical vertebra Sources Spinosaurids https://peerj.com/articles/1323/?utm_source=TrendMD&utm_campaign=PeerJ_TrendMD_1&utm_medium=TrendMD http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0144695 Sauropods Jeffrey A. Wilson & Ronan Allain (2015) Osteology of Rebbachisaurus garasbae Lavocat, 1954, a diplodocoid (Dinosauria, Sauropoda) from the early Late Cretaceous–aged Kem Kem beds of southeastern Morocco, Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 35:4, e1000701, DOI: 10.1080/02724634.2014.1000701 https://www.researchgate.net/publication/304214496_Evidence_of_a_derived_titanosaurian_Dinosauria_Sauropoda_in_the_Kem_Kem_beds_of_Morocco_with_comments_on_sauropod_paleoecology_in_the_Cretaceous_of_Africa Kemkemia sisn.pagepress.org/index.php/nhs/article/viewFile/nhs.2012.119/32 Pterosaurs https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.thefossilforum.com%2Fapplications%2Fcore%2Finterface%2Ffile%2Fattachment.php%3Fid%3D432009&fname=journal.pone.0010875.PDF&pdf=true https://riviste.unimi.it/index.php/RIPS/article/view/5967
  7. 10 likes
    Yes indeed it is! That periotic is from the sperm whale Aulophyseter morricei.
  8. 10 likes
    So I'll start here with my own Kem Kem vertebrae. Most of the are quite incomplete, which makes identification harder of course. I have a few of them figured out. But others are quite problematic. Here are the side and top views. Gimme a shout if I need to make some better photos of specific specimens. I've numbered all of them for easier reference. Numbers 1 to 3 are all clearly Spinosaurid and likely Sigilmassasaurus due to the small neural process and strong keels. Nr. 2 threw me off a bit since it's so incredibly small but the morphology seems pretty consistent with Sigilmassasaurus. Nr. 4 compared well with a Carcharodontosaurid vertebra @Troodon once posted on the forum, though I still have my doubts if my ID is correct. It's a pretty fragmentary chunk ofc. Nr. 5 looks like a croc cervical to me but it being concave at both ends is throwing me off as most good examples I can find of croc verts have a convex end as well. Nr. 6 should be identifiable as it's a complete neural arch, it seems to compare favourably to the cervicals of some crocs. And the zygapophyses on the front and back seem much to wide and oriented wrong to be Theropod. Nr. 1 Nr. 3 Nr. 7 is my largest Kem Kem vertebra, the size along eliminates a lot of animals. it's much too fat around the middle for any Spinosaurid imo. It seems quite heavily built so I think Sauropods can be ruled out as well. So the only really gigantic animals that are left are Carcharodontosaurids. Nr. 8 is a really weird one that I cannot place. It's quite fat, but also hollow in places and the centrum has one side at an angle. Due to it being hollow makes me think it's Theropod but I haven't been able to find a match yet. Nr. 9 is the back end of a sacrum. It compares pretty well to crocs, it seems fairly heavily built and the centrum is wider than tall. Nr. 10 I bought this one as a Deltadromeus vertebra. But I can't find any good reference of this animal so I dunno. Nr. 11 a dorsal vert with a rather wide neural canal, no clue really. Nr. 12 A nice little fragment, but not very informative. Don't think this can be ID'd Nr. 8 Nr. 9 Nr. 10 Nr. 13 A rather tall caudal vert that compares well with vertebrae attributed to Spinosaurids. But it's hard to find any really good reference. Nr. 14 Really latterally flat caudal vert, theropod? Nr. 15 caudal vert from near the end of the tail, also seems pretty slenderly built. Theropod? Nr. 16 and 17 Though 17 is much more damaged, the centra are the exact same shape. Also fairly slender. Nr. 18 I've posted this weird vertebra on the forum before as it's really bizarre. The centrum has a lateral pinch in the middle and directly above it there is a bulbous area that flares out to the sides. The consensus on the forum was that this is likely from a crocodile. Nr. 19 Another weird caudal from the very end of the tail. What's strange about this one is that the neural canal is really wide. I read somewhere that such a wide neural canal in this area of the tail is common for crocs. Nr. 20 A really small anterior caudal vertebra of a dinosaur. It has some hollow areas and it compares well with Theropods. But I haven't been able to find a good match yet. Judging from the size I'd say this animal was probably no bigger than 2 metres. Nr. 20 So those are my vertebrae from Kem Kem so far. I'd suggest people start posting theirs so we can compare them in the hopes that we might learn more about them.
  9. 10 likes
    I agree that the first one is quite a find. And till now unreported as far as I know from the St Clair area. I believe the second one, which was poorly preserved and only appears more interesting than I believe it to be. Based on the lack of even a crease to show any midveins in the pinnules, leads me to believe they did not have any. The only genus which lacks a midvein is Odontopteris. And the only species of Odontopteris reported at St. Clair is O. subcuneata. I don't know that this species is that "common" there but since O. subcuneata is a polymorphic form Macroneuropteris scheuchzerii and it is a common element in this flora, so it should be readily found there. The other features that can be made out also help confirm the taxon. The first one is very rare even where it is known to exist. So much so it is only described on fertile foliage and only one example of sterile foliage is known to exist. It is called Stellatheca ornata and you have a fertile example. A brief description; The ultimate and penultimate rachis appears wide (though partially due to pinnules being slightly confluent) Each pinnule typically has three sori, but can range from two to five, and are placed near the margin. And the pinnules are generally no more than rounded lobes. Attached is a picture of a Mazon Creek example. Hope this helps, Jack
  10. 9 likes
    Thaleops ovata Thaleops cranidium ceraurid sp. Isotelus sp. Basiliella barrandei Anataphrus vigilans ceraurid sp. Isotelus sp. Ectenaspis homalonotoides / Failleana indeterminatus Ectenaspis beckeri Ectenaspis beckeri
  11. 9 likes
    Thanks Well here is what I can say I do not believe it's Postosuchus because they have strong serrations on both edges around 2.4/mm and it's a compressed tooth with a bi-convex base not round on maxillary and dentary positions. However I cannot speak to other crocdylomorphs but typically the teeth would be similar. On the dinosaur side we have several canidates Coelophysis is the best understood. It's teeth have extremely fine serrations with 8 to 9 per mm on the entire distal edge. Anterior serrations vary from the entire edge to just the tip area. Serration density very different than your specimen. Chindesaurus is known from a couple of bones and one incomplete tooth. It's serration count is 5 per mm on both edges. Again a bit different than your specimen , not a good specimen to compare against and I think a Norian age Dino. A final candidate is Daemonosaurus and it might be the best fit but there is limited information published on the teeth. We know, both the premaxillary and anterior dentary teeth are rounded in transverse section with compressed crowns with finely serrated mesial and distal carinae. Hans-Dieter Sues; Sterling J. Nesbitt; David S. Berman & Amy C. Henrici (2011). "A late-surviving basal theropod dinosaur from the latest Triassic of North America". Proceedings of the Royal Society B. 278 (1723): 3459–3464. doi:10.1098/rspb.2011.0410. PMC 3177637 . PMID 21490016 The very late Triassic timeframe works for Daemonosaurus So in the end we really do not have comparative material to make a definitive call just some possibilities. I do however think it's dinosaurian.
  12. 8 likes
    The Twitter Paleontology World post cool images of fossils on Friday so I'm happy to steal from them and share some dinosaur ones with this forum Holotype specimen of the short-faced dromaeosaur Atrociraptor from the Horseshoe Canyon Fm of Alberta - ROM Oviraptorid Skull, Mongolia, Rinchenia mongoliensis AMNH Protoceratops andrewsi 3 Year old Tarbosaurus, Mongolia Skeleton of Baryonyx Amargasaurus, from Museo Paleontológico Egidio Feruglio, Patagonia, Argentina is a Sauropod. Diabloceratops holotype skull natural history museum of Utah Daspletosaurus maxilla -Tyrrell
  13. 8 likes
    Likely a Chinese gomphothere, Cf. Sinomastodon.
  14. 8 likes
    Wow, just saw this thread (I've been in the field all weekend here in SC - it's finally down into the 60s and comfortable outside!). Sorry I'm late to the party. Some various thoughts: 1) Folks who have answered above and failed to identify any anatomical features identifying this as a bone collectively have centuries of experience in avocational AND professional paleontology. I'm one of the professionals on here, have seen quite a lot of bones - and I see a rock. 2) What testing are you referring to? Hardness? Chemistry? These have nothing to do with vertebrate fossil identification and are completely spurious aspects of the physical properties of the object. You claim that nobody here is doing any testing, therefore casting doubt on the relevance of their opinions - but I ask - what relevant observations do you have? 3) As a followup to that, if you already have your mind made up, and don't want/care to hear what the good folks on this forum have to say, then why are you here asking us? Sorry to be so frank. 4) Lastly, I'll place the burden of proof back on you where it rightfully belongs (since it's your hypothesis you're trying to support). What proof do you have that this is bone? What specific anatomical features tell you it is bone? Does it have a marrow cavity? Does it have primary/secondary osteons? What kind of bone is it, histologically speaking? Where are the classic surficial features indicating that it is in fact a bone (e.g. pores, foramina, articular surfaces, sutural surfaces, etc.)? Which bone in the body is it? Which species does it represent? What synapomorphies are obvious that lend themselves to your identification? Please answer these questions carefully for us. A well-articulated, informative, and thoughtful presentation of this information is the best way to propose a hypothesis like yours. We all look forward to your answers to #4 and I guarantee all of us will listen to you without prejudice.
  15. 7 likes
    Paleontologists have found ticks grasping a dinosaur feather entombed in cretaceous amber. Those buggers will outlive us. Although not yet published they probably contributed to their extinction https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-017-01550-z
  16. 7 likes
    It’s not a claw but a cuttlefish prong, probably Belosaepia. Most likely Eocene,
  17. 7 likes
    I think it is a basal part of a hybodont shark tooth (probably Egertonodus). Is it from Wealden beds? I think I could have seen your specimen on the auction site. I also have similar hybodont teeth from the same location. Their labial side is strongly striated. Example
  18. 7 likes
    Flexicalymene ouzregui from Morocco. Ordovician in age, likely from the Anti-Atlas Mountain region.
  19. 7 likes
    There are several places in China where you can find horseshoe crabs - Yunnanolimulus luopingensis Zhang, Hu, Zhou, Lu & Bai, 2009 from the Triassic of Yunnan seems to be the most common.l Weichangopsis from the Cretaceous of Liaoning has two soft tail spines - Yunnanolimulus got only one hard spine.
  20. 7 likes
    Looks a bit like a Triops to me. So yeah, not a Horseshoe crab.
  21. 7 likes
    Hey Hi Boys and Girls, Ladies and gentlemen, and all others! I have noticed that the phrase "It is just a rock" is used quite often when a non fossil rock is posted for an ID. I think that this is a bad choice of wording that can cause confusion. Most fossils and all trace fossils can be described as being just a rock also. (lithified life) I humbly request that We refrain from using this terminology to describe a non fossil rock. Regards, Tony
  22. 7 likes
    Try this comparison:
  23. 7 likes
    Good point, @ynot. I've been guilty of having used that phrase on occasion in the past, so your point is very well taken. It is better if we can be more precise (such as in calling something a concretion, a piece of oolite, etc.). In future, perhaps instead of saying "just a rock" we can say "not a fossil." And, of course, for our geology-savvy members who enjoy collecting rocks and minerals in general (whether or not they are fossils), I suppose calling a non-fossil "just a rock" sounds kind of pejorative since even non-fossil rocks are interesting. We don't want to diminish or disparage those who take delight in collecting non-fossil rocks and minerals.
  24. 7 likes
    There are a lot of different types of "sandstone". Some are very frail while others are quite stable. It depends on the mineral makeup of the "sand" and of the bonding mineral/method. What type of metal "wire wheel" are You using? (brass, iron, other) Your method to determine "hardness" is flawed and will not give any reliable results. Google "mohs hardness test" to learn about mineral hardness. This method is used for mineral specimens and does not work for most rock types because they are made of several minerals. As others have said, this forum has a lot of experience with rock and fossil. Some pieces are easy for Us to identify because We have seen a lot of it. That does not mean We are not open minded, just experienced. Check out this thread to see how "open minded scientific" The Fossil Forum can be. Kind regards, Tony
  25. 7 likes
    The taxa may be differentiated. Clean out the foramina and photograph them and any remaining muscle attachments. Not real close-ups, but close enough to still locate these features on the bone.
  26. 6 likes
    Well, This is a story that tangentially relates to fossil excursions. I'm not one to want to collect jars of shards or Leaverites but I do like to pocket teeth that I think would be good for trades , gifts etc. My son is approaching the age now where he shows a bit more interest and he has started many 'collections' , shark teeth being one of many. (he collects rocks, sticks, bugs, buttons, shiny crystals - more rocks-, you get the idea) I visited his school this morning for my first (hopefully one of many) presentations. I had a few visual aids up on the projector screen but mainly talked about the Oligocene of South Carolina and sharks. Well, ok Megalodon sharks and the things that they ate, and the landscape at the time. 20 minutes was about all that these figit-y pre-k and kindergarten kids would give me but it was worth it. I may have converted a few in the process. Of course images of fossilized poo won the day and got the biggest reaction. Go figure ... though, I did stick those images in for that very reason. I'd like to give a shout out to Bobby @Boesse and the Mace Brown Museum of Natural History in Charleston for the inspiration. The exhibits there are outstanding and really give you a nice slice of the fauna in the area at the time. I relied on shots from inside of the museum for visual aids when discussing Basilosaurids and the evolution of whales (the kids honestly were more impressed with the whale's teeth). And if it wasn't for Cade and his most excellent hand-drawn identification page @Sharks of SC I don't think the visuals would have been half as impressive. The kids loved the handouts Cade and the cool thing is they double as something that they can color ! The prep Goodie bags for 22 students. They each got 5 teeth from 4 different sharks. Angy partials Oh, and if you are curious the meg at the far end of the table is a beautiful 7" inch reproduction of a Meg tooth by Matty Swilp. One the kids could handle and toss around without me having a heart attack. It looks amazing. The 7 inch repro ... Cheers, Brett
  27. 6 likes
    Here is a great TFF exclusive, a list of all the trilobite papers published in 2017. In 2017 a total of 163 trilobite papers were published, down slightly from 173 in 2016: LINK Unfortunately, only 51 could be posted as open access papers at Trilobite Papers 2006-2017. Please contact me via PM if any additional papers are needed from this list. Looking forward to another great year of trilobites in 2018! Tortello, M.F. (2017) Trilobites from the Lejopyge laevigata Zone (Guzhangian; Upper Middle Cambrian) of the San Isidro Area, Mendoza, Argentina. Ameghiniana, 54(4):465-474 Sun, X.W., Bentley, C.J., & Jago, J.B. (2017) The significance of Cambro-Ordovician trilobites from the Kalladeina 1 drill hole, Warburton Basin, South Australia. Australian Journal of Earth Sciences, 64(4):471-485 John, D.L., Medeiros, P.M., Babcock-Adams, L., & Walker, S.E. (2017) Cambrian Trilobites as Archives for Anthropocene Biomarkers and Other Chemical Compounds. Anthropocene, 17:99-106 Benedetto, J.L., Lavie, F.J., & Muñoz, D.F. (2017) Broeggeria Walcott and other upper Cambrian and Tremadocian linguloid brachiopods from NW Argentina. Geological Journal, (ahead-of-print publication) Westrop, S.R., & Landing, E. (2017) The agnostoid arthropod Lotagnostus Whitehouse, 1936 (late Cambrian; Furongian) from Avalonian Cape Breton Island (Nova Scotia, Canada) and its significance for international correlation. Geological Magazine 154(5):1001-1021 Zeng, H., Zhao, F., Yin, Z., & Zhu, M. (2017) Appendages of an early Cambrian metadoxidid trilobite from Yunnan, SW China support mandibulate affinities of trilobites and artiopods. Geological Magazine, 154(6):1306-1328 Álvaro, J.J., Esteve, J., & Zamora, S. (2017) Morphological assessment of the earliest paradoxidid trilobites (Cambrian Series 3) from Morocco and Spain. Geological Magazine, (ahead-of-print publication) Crônier, C., Abbache, A., Khaldi, A.Y., Oudot, M., Maillet, S., & Mehadji, A. (2017) Middle Devonian trilobites of the Saoura Valley, Algeria: insights into their biodiversity and Moroccan affinities. Geological Magazine, (ahead-of-print publication) Heward, A.P., Booth, G.A., Fortey, R.A., Miller, C.G., & Sansom, I.J. (2017) Darriwilian shallow-marine deposits from the Sultanate of Oman, a poorly known portion of the Arabian margin of Gondwana. Geological Magazine, (ahead-of-print publication) Park, T.Y. (2017) Ontogeny of the two co-occurring middle Furongian (late Cambrian) shumardiid trilobites and the protaspid morphology of shumardiids. Geological Magazine, (ahead-of-print publication) Monti, D.S. (2017) Morphometrics of Leptoplastides marianus (Hoek) (Trilobita, Olenidae) from the Tremadocian of north-western Argentina: taxonomic implications. Journal of Systematic Palaeontology, (ahead-of-print publication) Ebbestad, J.O.R., & Weidner, T. (2017) Extreme protomeric development in a burlingiid trilobite from Cambrian glacial erratics of Denmark. Palaeontology, 60(2):233-253 Hopkins, M.J. (2017) How well does a part represent the whole? A comparison of cranidial shape evolution with exoskeletal character evolution in the trilobite family Pterocephaliidae. Palaeontology, 60(3):309-318 Esteve, J., Rubio, P., Zamora, S., & Rahman, I.A. (2017) Modelling enrolment in Cambrian trilobites. Palaeontology, 60(3):423-432 Trenchard, H., Brett, C.E., & Perc, M. (2017) Trilobite ‘pelotons’: possible hydrodynamic drag effects between leading and following trilobites in trilobite queues. Palaeontology, 60(4):557-569 Laibl, L (2017) Patterns in Palaeontology: The development of trilobites. Palaeontology Online, 7(10):1-9 Fletcher, T.P. (2017) Agraulos ceticephalus and other Cambrian trilobites in the subfamily Agraulinae from Bohemia, Newfoundland and Wales. Papers in Palaeontology, 3(2):175-217 Schoenemann, B., & Clarkson, E.N.K. (2017) Vision in fossilised eyes. Earth and Environmental Science Transactions of The Royal Society of Edinburgh, 106(4):209-220 McCobb, L.M.E., & Popov, L.E. (2017) Late Ordovician trilobites from the Mayatas Formation, Atansor area, north-central Kazakhstan. Earth and Environmental Science Transactions of The Royal Society of Edinburgh, 107(1):33-52 Becker, M.A., Chamberlain, R.B., Maisch, H.M., Bartholomew, A., & Chamberlain, J.A. (2017) Trilobites from the Rickard Hill facies of the Saugerties Member of the Schoharie Formation, eastern New York (upper Emsian and Lower Devonian): a case study in taphonomy and sequence stratigraphy from glacial erratics. Atlantic Geology, 53:269-284 Westrop, S.R., & Dengler, A.A. (2017) The mid-Cambrian (Series 3, Drumian–Guzhangian; Marjuman) trilobite Holmdalia Robison, 1988, in western Newfoundland and its biostratigraphic significance. Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, 54(2):113-128 Knight, I., Boyce, W.D., Skovsted, C.B., & Balthasar, U. (2017) The Lower Cambrian Forteau Formation, southern Labrador and Great Northern Peninsula, western Newfoundland: Lithostratigraphy, trilobites, and depositional setting. Government of Newfoundland and Labrador, Department of Natural Resources, Geological Survey, St. John’s, Occasional Papers, 2017(1):1-72 Lin, T. (2017) Notes on the genus Asteromajia Nan and Chang, 1982 (Trilobita, Cambrian). Acta Palaeontologica Sinica, 56(1):1-9 Gao J., & Yuan J. (2017) Revision of the type species of the genus Kunmingaspis Chang, 1964 (Trilobita). Acta Palaeontologica Sinica, 56(1):10-19 Pang C.J., Han, N., Chen G.Y., & Wen, S. (2017) Techniques of exuviation in Liaodong species of early Cambrian trilobite Redlichia (Pteroredlichia) murakamii Resser et Endo. Acta Palaeontologica Sinica, 56(1):20-24 Liang B.Y., Peng, J., Wen, R.Q., & Liu, S. (2017) Ontogeny of the trilobite Redlichia (Pteroredlichia) chinensis (Walcott, 1905) from the Cambrian Balang Formation. Acta Palaeontologica Sinica, 56(1):25-36 Ren, G.Y., Wei, C.T., & Yuan, J.L. (2017) Revision of Shantungia (Trilobita: Damesellidae) from the Kushan Formation (Guzhangian), Shandong, China. Palaeoworld, 26(3):423-430 Wei, X., & Zhan, R.B. (2017) A late Rhuddanian (early Llandovery, Silurian) trilobite association from South China and its implications. Palaeoworld, (ahead-of-print publication) Pärnaste, H. (ed.) 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives. Tallinn, Estonia, 7-10 July 2017. Abstracts. Libris Est OÜ, Tallinn, 40 pp. Adrain, J.M. (2017) "Cryptogenesis" a half century on–progress(?) and problems in higher trilobite phylogeny. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Ahlberg, P., Lundberg, F., Erlström, M., Calner, M., Lindskog, A., Dahlqvist, P., Lehnert, O., & Joachimski, M.M. (2017) Integrated Cambrian trilobite biostratigraphy and δ13Corg chemostratigraphy of the Grönhögen-2015 drill core, Öland, Sweden. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Munkhjargal, A. (2017) Trilobites from the Durvun Dert section, southern Mongolia. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Bernárdez, E., Rábano, I., Esteve, J. Laibl, L., & Gutiérrez-Marco, J.C. (2017) Trilobite ?eggs and babies from the “Túnel Ordovícico del Fabar” (Cantabrian Zone, northwestern Spain). Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Birch, R., McCobb, L.M.E., & Rushton, A.W.A. (2017) Little Green Seam of Unloved Slate. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Briggs, D.E.G. (2017) Thresholds in trilobite taphonomy. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Brodskii, A.V. (2017) A new glaphurid trilobite genus and species from the Darriwilian of the Saint Petersburg area. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Budil, P., Frýda, J., Chatterton, B.D.E., Corbacho, J., & Vokác, V. (2017) Intraspecific variability in the lichid trilobites Acanthopyge (A.) haueri and Acanthopyge (A.?) pervasta from the Devonian of the Barrandian area (Czech Republic). Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Coronado, I., & Esteve, J. (2017) Microstructural and crystallographic characterization of Cambrian trilobites (Shandong Province, North China): perspectives on trilobite biomineralization. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Crônier, C., Budil, P. Fatka, O., & Laibl, L. (2017) Bimodal variability and quantification in two Devonian trilobites. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Drage, H.B., Laibl, L., & Budil, P. (2017) Post-embryonic development of Dalmanitina proaeva, and the evolution of facial suture fusion in Phacopina. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Ebbestad, J.O.R., Høyberget, M., Högström, A.E., Jensen, S., Taylor, W., & Palacios, T. (2017) Holmiid trilobites from the lower Cambrian of the Digermulen Peninsula, Arctic Norway. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Esteve, J., Marcé-Nogué, J., Pérez-Peris, F., Rayfield, E. (2017) Origin of the dorsal facial sutures in trilobites. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Fatka, O., Kozák, V., Budil, P., Laibl, L. (2017) Hypostomes and ventral plates in Cambrian agnostids from the Barrandian area (Czech Republic). Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Fortey, R.A., & Ebbestad, J.O.R. (2017) Ordovician trilobites from Taimyr and the identity of Taimyraspis Balashova, 1959. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Geyer, G. (2017) The world’s oldest trilobites? A new look to the earliest known trilobites from the Anti-Atlas of Morocco. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Ghobadi Pour, M., Popov, L.E., Owens, R. Klishevich, I.A., & Vinogradova, E.A. (2017) First Early Devonian (Lochkovian) trilobites from the Shakshagaily Formation of the West Balkhash Region, Kazakhstan. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Gutiérrez-Marco, J.C., Rábano, I., & García-Bellido, D.C. (2017) The nileid trilobite Symphysurus from upper Tremadocian strata of the Moroccan Anti-Atlas: taxonomic reappraisal and palaeoenvironmental implications. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Gutiérrez-Marco J.C., Rábano, I., García-Bellido, D.C., & Sá, A.A. (2017) Selenopeltis longispina (Trilobita, Odontopleurida) from the Ordovician of Morocco: a reappraisal based on new skeletal and soft-bodied features. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Holloway, D.J. (2017) Trilobites of the orders Corynexochida, Lichida and Odontopleurida from the Silurian of northern Arkansas. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Hong, P.S. (2017) Cambrian Stage 5 trilobites from the lower Machari Formation, Taebaeksan Basin, Korea. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Hopkins, M.J. (2017) How well does cranidial shape evolution represent the evolution of the entire exoskeleton? Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Hou J., Hughes, N.C., Y.J., Zhang X., & Lan, T. (2017) Development and growth of the metadoxidid trilobite Hongshiyanaspis yiliangensis from the lower Cambrian (Series 2, Stage3) of southern China. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Hughes, H.E., & Thomas, A.T. (2017) Taphonomy and predation of Dalmanites in the Wenlock of Shropshire. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Hughes, N.C. (2017) Enrolment as an adaptive lens for viewing the evolution of trilobite trunk body patterning. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Kisailus, D., Herrera, S., Sarkar, S., Pärnaste, H., & Hughes, N.C. (2017) New materials inspired from fossils. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Laibl, L., Cederström, P., & Ahlberg, P. (2017) Early post-embryonic development in Ellipsostrenua and the developmental patterns in Ellipsocephaloidea. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Laibl, L., Esteve, J., & Fatka, O. (2017) Morphology, development and geographical variability of Sao hirsuta. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Lee, S.B. (2017) Polymerid trilobite assemblages in the Eosaukia Zone (Cambrian Stage 10, Furongian) of Korea and their biostratigraphic significance. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Lieberman, B.S. (2017) Trilobites, Contingency, and Predictability in the History of Life: the Relevance of Volatility to Macroevolution. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Losso, S.R., & Adrain, J.M. (2017) A new genus of trilobites from the Early Ordovician of the Great Basin (Utah and Idaho), and the phylogenetic structure of Dimeropygidae. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Machida, N., Agematsu, S., Sashida, K., & Sarsud, A. (2017) Preliminary report on the Early Devonian faunal and environmental transition of the phacopid trilobite Plagiolaria poothaii from southern Thailand. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia McCobb, L.M.E., McDermott, P.D., & Owen, A.W. (2017) The trilobites of the latest Katian Slade and Redhill Mudstone Formation, South West Wales. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia McDermott, P.D., McCobb, L.M.E., & Owen, A.W. (2017) The trilobite fauna of an uppermost Katian echinoderm lagerstätte. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Nowicki, J., & Zylinska, A. (2017) Gondwanan affinities of the earliest Paradoxididae in Baltica – new data from the Cambrian of the Holy Cross Mountains, Poland. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Pärnaste, H., Hughes, N.C., Kisailus, D., Sarkar, S., Herrera, S., Ahlberg, P., & Ebbestad, J.O.R. (2017) Lükati - a new Lower Cambrian Lagerstätte. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Pates, S., Bicknell, R.D.C., Daley, A.C., & Zamora, S. (2017) A quantitative analysis of repaired and unrepaired damage on Cambrian (Stage 4 and Drumian) trilobites from three sites in the Iberian Chains, Spain. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Peng S., Babcock, L.E., & Zhu X. (2017) Revised concept for Cambrian oryctocephalid trilobite genera Arthricocephalus Bergeron and Oryctocarella Tomashpolskaya and Karpinski. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Peng S., & & Zhu X. (2017) A new oryctocephalid trilobite genus from the Balang Formation (Cambrian Stage 4), northwestern Hunan, South China. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Pereira, S., Holloway, D.J., Adrain, J.M., da Silva, C.M., & Sá, A.A. (2017) Panderiidae and Hemibarrandiidae (Trilobita): their affinities with Nileidae. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Pérez-Peris, F., & Esteve, J. (2017) Morphological assessment of the agnostids Peronopsis ferox and Peronopsis acadica from North Spain. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Pratt, B.R., & Kimmig, J. (2017) Middle Cambrian coprolites from northwestern Canada, and their implications for the food chain and ecology of trilobites and hyoliths in deeper water. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Schoenemann, B., Pärnaste, H., & Clarkson, E.N.K. (2017) A Modern Visual System in the Compound Eye from the Base of the Lower Cambrian. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Sinclair, C.R., Gibb, S., & Sperling, F. (2017) Sexual dimorphism in Moroccan trilobites: evidence from morphological clustering and phylogenetic bracketing. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Stocker, C., Lane, P., Siveter, D., Wallis, S., Oji, T., Vandenbroucke, T., Siveter, D., Tanaka, G., Komatsu, T., Zalasiewicz, J., & Williams, M. (2017) The Silurian and Devonian proetid trilobites of Japan: a biogeographically or ecologically isolated fauna? Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Wernette, S.J., Hughes, N.C., Myrow, P.M., Aung, A.K., Sardsud, A. (2017) New upper Cambrian trilobites from Thailand and Myanmar and their stratigraphic significance. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Zhang Z., Zhang Z., Ghobadi Pour, M., Holmer, L.E., & Popov, L.E. (2017) The earliest known trilobite occurrence on the north-central Yangtze platform and its biostratigraphic significance. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Zhu X. (2017) New harpetid material from the Guole Biota. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Zwanzig, M. (2017) Exceptional preservation of the outermost cuticular layer in calymenid sclerites found inside orthocone nautiloids from the Silurian of Gotland (Sweden). Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Zylinska, A., & Nowicki, J. (2017) Retrodeforming Cambrian trilobites using morphometric techniques – two case studies from the Holy Cross Mountains, Poland. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Pärnaste, H. (ed.) 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives. Excursion Guidebook Tallinn, Estonia, 7-10 July 2017. Abstracts. Libris Est OÜ, Tallinn, 52 pp. Dai T., Zhang X., & Peng S. (2017) Post-embryonic development and Intraspecific variation in trunk segmentation of the oryctocephalid trilobite Oryctocarella duyunensis from the Cambrian of South China. In: Liu, A., McIlroy, D., Narbonne, G., & Laflamme, M. (eds.) International Symposium on the Ediacaran-Cambrian Transition Geyer, G. (2017) Final fanfare: an ultimate glance to the Lower–Middle Cambrian boundary dilemma. In: Liu, A., McIlroy, D., Narbonne, G., & Laflamme, M. (eds.) International Symposium on the Ediacaran-Cambrian Transition Hildenbrand, A., Austermann, G., & Bengtson, P. (2017) Taxonomy of Drumian (middle Cambrian) agnostid trilobites of the Manuels River Formation from Conception Bay South, Newfoundland, Canada: implications for biostratigraphy, palaeobiogeography and palaeogeography. In: Liu, A., McIlroy, D., Narbonne, G., & Laflamme, M. (eds.) International Symposium on the Ediacaran-Cambrian Transition Jackson, I.S.C., Bohlin, M., Mann, R.P., & Budd, G.E. (2017) Genetic assimilation in the fossil record: the interplay of environment and selection in the Series Three trilobite-like arthropod Agnostus pisiformis from Avalonia and Baltica. In: Liu, A., McIlroy, D., Narbonne, G., & Laflamme, M. (eds.) International Symposium on the Ediacaran-Cambrian Transition Landing, E., Schmitz, M., Geyer, G., & Bowring, S.E. (2017) Precise U-Pb volcanic zircon dates show diachroneity of oldest Cambrian trilobites: Examples from the West Gondwana (southern Morocco) and Avalonia paleocontinents. In: Liu, A., McIlroy, D., Narbonne, G., & Laflamme, M. (eds.) International Symposium on the Ediacaran-Cambrian Transition Park, T.Y.S., Kihm, J.H., Woo, J., Kim, Y.H.G., & Lee, J.I. (2017) Ontogeny of the Furongian (late Cambrian) trilobite Proceratopyge cf. P. lata Whitehouse, 1939 from northern Victoria Land, Antarctica, and the evolution of metamorphosis in trilobites. In: Liu, A., McIlroy, D., Narbonne, G., & Laflamme, M. (eds.) International Symposium on the Ediacaran-Cambrian Transition Zeng H., Zhao F., Yin Z., & Zhu, M. (2017) Appendages of an early Cambrian trilobite support mandibulate affinities of trilobites and artiopods. In: Liu, A., McIlroy, D., Narbonne, G., & Laflamme, M. (eds.) International Symposium on the Ediacaran-Cambrian Transition Zhu X., & & Peng S. (2017) Chencunia (Trilobita, Cambrian), a junior synonym of Paraacidaspis. In: Liu, A., McIlroy, D., Narbonne, G., & Laflamme, M. (eds.) International Symposium on the Ediacaran-Cambrian Transition Van Viersen, A., Holland, D., & Koppka, J. (2017) The phacopine trilobite genera Morocops Basse, 2006 and Adrisiops gen. nov. from the Devonian of Morocco. Czech Geological Survey, Bulletin of Geosciences, 92(1):13-30 Fortey, R.A., & Edgecombe, G.D. (2017) An Upper Ordovician (Katian) trilobite fauna from the Lower Ktaoua Formation, Morocco. Czech Geological Survey, Bulletin of Geosciences, 92(3):311-322 Vyhnánková, I. (2017) Morphology of genal caeca in selected trilobites from the Barrandian area. Diploma Thesis, Charles University, 76 pp. Laibl, L., & Fatka, O. (2017) Review of early developmental stages of trilobites and agnostids from the Barrandian area (Czech Republic). Journal of the National Museum Prague, Natural History Series, 186:103-112 Fatka, O., & Budil, P. (2017) Digestive structures in the Middle Ordovician trilobite Prionocheilus Rouault, 1847 from the Barrandian area of Czech Republic. Geologica Acta, (ahead-of-print publication) Hughes, N.C., Hong, P., Hou, J. B., & Fusco, G. (2017) The development of the Silurian trilobite Aulacopleura koninckii reconstructed by applying inferred growth and segmentation dynamics: a case study in paleo-evo-devo. Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, 5(37):1-12 Zhang, X., Ahlberg, P., Babcock, L.E., Choi, D.K., Geyer, G., Gozalo, R., Hollingsworth, J.S., Li, G., Naimark, E.B., Pegel, T., Steiner, M., Wotte, T., & Zhang, Z. (2017) Challenges in defining the base of Cambrian Series 2 and Stage 3. Earth-Science Reviews, 172:124-139 Eriksson, M.E., & Horn, E. (2017) Agnostus pisiformis - a half a billion-year old pea-shaped enigma. Earth-Science Reviews, 173:65-76 Vinna, O., Toomb, U., & Isakarc, M. (2017) The earliest cornulitid on the internal surface of the illaenid pygidium from the Middle Ordovician of Estonia. Estonian Journal of Earth Sciences, 66(4):193-197 Singh, B.P., Bhargava, O.N., Negi, R.S., Zhao, Y., Yin, L., & Sharma, C.A. (2017) Additional trilobite fauna from the basal part of the Cambrian Series 3, Stage 5, Kunzam La (= Parahio) Formation, Parahio Valley, Spiti (Northwest Himalaya), India and its biostratigraphic significance. Annales de Paléontologie, 103:271-281 Farrar, L.E. & Fall, L.M. (2017) How does body size and abundance of trilobites change along a water depth gradient in the Trenton Group (Middle Ordovician) of central New York? GSA 290408 (Joint 52nd Northeastern Annual Section / 51st North-Central Annual Section Meeting) Paper No. 46-11 Censullo, S.M., & McRoberts, C. (2017) Triarthrus from the Upper Ordovician of New York revisited: taphonomic, taxonomic and morphometric analysis of Triarthrus beckii green and Triarthrus eatoni (Hall). GSA 290503 (Joint 52nd Northeastern Annual Section / 51st North-Central Annual Section Meeting) Paper No. 46-4 Repetski, J.E., Taylor, J.F., Kulenguski, J.T., & Strauss, J.V. (2017) New conodont and trilobite occurrences from the Cambrian of eastern Alaska. GSA 291377 (Joint 52nd Northeastern Annual Section / 51st North-Central Annual Section Meeting) Rippenhagen, A.H., & Fornwald, C. (2017) Hitting the slopes: the key to trilobite taphonomy. GSA 293238 (Rocky Mountain Section - 69th Annual Meeting) Paper No. 6-3 Hildenbrand, A., Austermann, G., & Bengtson, P. (2017) Agnostid trilobites and small shelly fossils (SSFS) from the Drumian (Middle Cambrian) Manuels River Formation, Conception Bay South, Newfoundland, Canada - implications for biostratigraphy, paleobiogeography and paleogeography. GSA 300045 (GSA Annual Meeting in Seattle, Washington) Paper No. 83-3 Hopkins, M.J., & Lamsdell, J.C. (2017) No change in morphological disparity in lichid trilobites across the end-Ordovician extinction. GSA 305827 (GSA Annual Meeting in Seattle, Washington) Paper No. 1-1 Losso, S.R., & Adrain, J.M. (2017) New genera of dimeropygid trilobites from the early Ordovician of the western United States and the phylogenetic structure of the family. GSA 306977 (GSA Annual Meeting in Seattle, Washington) Paper No. 84-15 Hegna, T.A., Martin, M.J., & Darroch, S.A. (2017) Pyritized in situ trilobite eggs from the Ordovician of New York (Lorraine Group): Implications for trilobite reproductive biology. Geology, 45(3):199-202 Alberti, M. (2017) Eigentu¨mliche Trilobiten. In: Wie Phönix aus der Asche – die Fauna des Limoptera-Porphyroids. Fossilien, 2017(1):8-11 Basse, M. (2017) Die ventralseite des Trilobiten Rhenops - eine Terra incognita. Fossilien, 2017(2):32-35 Resch, U., & Rückert, A. (2017) Bizarre Schönheiten - Neues von der Trilobitengattung Ceratarges. Fossilien, 2017(6):15-19 Basse, M., Müller, P., & Ahrens, M. (2017) Die Trilobitengattung Macroblepharum im Devon von Deutschland. Fossilien, 2017(6):20-27 Hartmann, M. (2017) Trilobitenfunde aus mittelkambrischen Geschieben von Sanzkow bei Demmin (Vorpommern). [Germany] Geschiebekunde Aktuell, 33(1):3-5 Koch, L. & Basse, M. (2017) Die Trilobiten Dechenella und Teichertops in den Oberen Honsel-Schichten (Unter-Givetium) von Ennepetal (Nordrhein-Westfalen). Jahresbericht des Naturwissenschaftlichen Vereins in Wuppertal, 64:63-96 Van Viersen, A.P., Taghon, P., & Magrean, B. (2017) The phacopid trilobites Austerops McKellar & Chatterton, 2009, Hottonops gen. nov. and Loreleiops gen. nov. from the Devonian of the Ardenno-Rhenish Mountains. Neues Jahrbuch für Geologie und Paläontologie-Abhandlungen, 283(1):53-68 Geyer, G. (2017) Trilobites of the Galgenberg Member (Tannenknock Formation), middle Cambrian Stage 5, Franconian Forest, Germany: a paradigmatic lowermost middle Cambrian West Gondwanan fauna. Paläontologische Zeitschrift, 91(1):5-70 Lerosey-Aubril, R., Paterson, J.R., Gibb, S., & Chatterton, B.D.E. (2017) Exceptionally-preserved late Cambrian fossils from the McKay Group (British Columbia, Canada) and the evolution of tagmosis in aglaspidid arthropods. Gondwana Research, 42:264-279 Esteve, J., & Yuan J.L. (2017) Palaeoecology and evolutionary implications of enrolled trilobites from the Kushan Formation, Guzhangian of North China. Historical Biology, 29(3):328-340 Hopkins, M.J. (2017) Development, Trait Evolution, and the Evolution of Development in Trilobites. Integrative and Comparative Biology, 58:488-498 Ameri, H., Yazdim, M., & Bahrami, A. (2017) Pseudophillipsia (Carniphillipsia) (Trilobite) from the Permian Jamal Formation, Isfahan, Iran. Journal of Sciences Islamic Republic of Iran, 28(4):325-336 Hou, J.B., Hughes, N.C., Yang, J., Lan, T., Zhang, X. G., & Dominguez, C. (2017) Ontogeny of the articulated yiliangellinine trilobite Zhangshania typica from the lower Cambrian (Series 2, Stage 3) of southern China. Journal of Paleontology, 91(1):86-99 Geyer, G., & Peel, J.S. (2017) Middle Cambrian trilobites from the Ekspedition Bræ Formation of North Greenland, with a reappraisal of the genus Elrathina. Journal of Paleontology, 91(2):265-293 Loch, J., & Ethington, R. (2017) An integrated trilobite and conodont biostratigraphy across the base of the Laurentian Whiterockian Series (lower Middle Ordovician) at its stratotype, Whiterock Canyon Narrows, Nevada. Journal of Paleontology, 91(2):294-317 Monti, D.S., & Confalonieri, V.A. (2017) Comparing phylogenetics and linear morphometrics to solve the generic assignment of Parabolinella? triarthroides Harrington (Trilobita, Olenidae). Journal of Paleontology, 91(5):919-932 Peng, S., Babcock, L.E., Zhu, X., Lei, Q., & Dai, T. (2017) Revision of the oryctocephalid trilobite genera Arthricocephalus Bergeron and Oryctocarella Tomashpolskaya and Karpinski (Cambrian) from South China and Siberia. Journal of Paleontology, 91(5):933-959 Choi, D.K., & Park, T.Y.S. (2017) Recent advances of trilobite research in Korea: taxonomy, biostratigraphy, paleogeography, and ontogeny and phylogeny. Geosciences Journal, (ahead-of-print publication) Park, T.Y.S., & Kihm, J.H. (2017) Head segmentation of trilobites. Lethaia, 50(1):1-6 Boyer, D.L., & Mitchell, C.E. (2017) Aligned trace fossils from the Utica Shale: implications for mode of life and feeding in the trilobite Triarthrus beckii. Lethaia, 50(1):69-78 Esteve, J., Zhao, Y., & Peng, J. (2017). Morphological assessment of the Cambrian trilobites Oryctocephalus indicus (Reed 1910) from China and Oryctocephalus ‘reticulatus’(Lermontova 1940) from Siberia. Lethaia, 50(1):175-193 Babcock, L.E., Peng, S., & Ahlberg, P. (2017) Cambrian trilobite biostratigraphy and its role in developing an integrated history of the Earth system. Lethaia, 50(3):381-399 Zhao, Y.L., Yuan, J.L., Esteve, J., & Peng, J. (2017) The oryctocephalid trilobite zonation across the Cambrian Series 2-Series 3 boundary at Balang, South China: a reappraisal. Lethaia, 50(3):400-406 Jackson, I.S.C., & Budd, G.E. (2017) Intraspecific morphological variation of Agnostus pisiformis, a Cambrian Series 3 trilobite-like arthropod. Lethaia, 50(4):467-485 Dai, T., Zhang, X.L., Peng, S.C., & Yao, X.Y. (2017) Intraspecific variation of trunk segmentation in the oryctocephalid trilobite Duyunaspis duyunensis from the Cambrian (Stage 4, Series 2) of South China. Lethaia, 50(4):527-539 Esteve, J., Gutiérrez-Marco, J.C., Rubio, P., & Rábano, I. (2017) Evolution of trilobite enrolment during the Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event: insights from kinematic modelling. Lethaia, (ahead-of-print publication) Gutiérrez-Marco, J.C. (2017) Trilobites of exceptional conservation in the Ordovician of Morocco. Enseñanza de las Ciencias de la Tierra, 25(2):250-252 Gutiérrez-Marco, J.C., García-Bellido, D.C., Rábano, I., & Sá, A.A. (2017) Digestive and appendicular soft-parts, with behavioural implications, in a large Ordovician trilobite from the Fezouata Lagerstätte, Morocco. Nature Scientific Reports, 7(39728):1-7 Schoenemann, B., Clarkson, E.N.K, & Høyberget, M. (2017) Traces of an ancient immune system–how an injured arthropod survived 465 million years ago. Nature Scientific Reports, 7(40330):1-9 Laibl, L., Esteve, J., & Fatka, O. (2017) Giant postembryonic stages of Hydrocephalus and Eccaparadoxides and the origin of lecithotrophy in Cambrian trilobites. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 470:109-115 Zong, R.W., & Gong, Y. (2017) Behavioural asymmetry in Devonian trilobites. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 476:158-162 Faggetter, L.E., Wignall, P.B., Pruss, S.B., Newton, R.J., Sun, Y., & Crowley, S.F. (2017) Trilobite extinctions, facies changes and the ROECE carbon isotope excursion at the Cambrian Series 2–3 boundary, Great Basin, western USA. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 478:53-66 Bapst, D.W., & Hopkins, M.J. (2017) Comparing cal3 and other a posteriori time-scaling approaches in a case study with the pterocephaliid trilobites. Paleobiology, 43(1):49-67 Brezinski, D.K. (2017) Trilobites from the Redwall Limestone (Mississippian) of Arizona. Annals of Carnegie Museum, 84(2):165-171 Brezinski, D.K. (2017) Some New Late Mississippian Trilobites from Oklahoma and Arkansas. Annals of Carnegie Museum, 84(2):173-178 Hopkins, M.J., Chen, F., Hu, S., & Zhang, Z. (2017) The oldest known digestive system consisting of both paired digestive glands and a crop from exceptionally preserved trilobites of the Guanshan Biota (Early Cambrian, China). PloS one, 12(9):e0184982 Caprichoso,C., Mateus, S., Sá, A.A., & Legoinha, P. (2017) Devonian Trilobites of the Collections of the Natural History and Science Museum of the University or Porto (Portugal) - a rediscovery. In: A Glimpse of the Past. Abstract book of the XV Encuentro de Jóvenes Investigadores en Paleontología Caprichoso, C., Legoinha, P. Martínez-Graña, A., & Sá, A.A. (2017) Utilização do Google Earth para relocalização de ocorrências de trilobites Calymenina no Devónico de Portugal. In: Livro de Resumos da XXII Bienal da RSEHN, Madrid-Coimbra Korovnikov, I.V. (2017) Influence of paleogeographic conditions for formation complexes of trilobites of the early and middle Cambrian (r. Lena, lower current, Chekurov anticlinal). In: Integral paleontology: development prospects for geological purposes. Paleontological Society of the Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg Terent'ev, S.S. & Gorshenina, V.V. (2017) Unique event of mass "link" trilobites in the upper Ordovician of the west of the Leningrad region. In: Integral paleontology: development prospects for geological purposes. Paleontological Society of the Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg Mychko, E.V., & Alekseev, A.S. (2017) Localities of middle Carboniferous – Permian trilobites in Russia and surrounding countries. Bulletin of the Moscow Society of Naturalists, Geology Series Journal, 92:40-83 Mychko, E.V. (2017) Locations of trilobites of middle-upper Carboniferous and Permian in the Republic of Komi. 26th Scientific Conference, Komi Institute of Geology, Russian Academy of Sciences, 26:149-153 Zaika, Y.U., & Krylov, A.V. (2017) Ordovician erratic trilobites (Arthropoda, Trilobita) from Pleistocene deposits of Belarus (preliminary data). Baranovichi State University Bulletin, 2017:71-81 Shchedukhin, A.Y., & Ratnikov, V.Y. (2017) On the finding of trilobite in the Devonian deposits of the Pavlovsk granite quarry. Voronezh State University, Geology Bulletin, 3:122-123 Korovnikov, I.V., & Novozhilova, N.V. (2017) Middle Cambrian Trilobites from the Vicinity of Dolgii Mys Mountain (Khakassia, Batenevsky Ridge). Paleontological Journal, 51(3):264-272 Sennikov, N.V., Timokhin, A.V., & Lykova, E.V. (2017) Depth differentiation of the middle Ordovician graptolite and trilobite complexes of Gorny Altai. Geologiya i Geofizika, 58(6):880-899 Corbacho, J., & Hammond, K. (2017) Techniques of cleaning and recovery of Moroccan trilobites. Museo Geològico del Seminari de Barcelona, Batalleria, 24:9-16 Corbacho, J., López-Soriano, F.J., Lemke, U., & Hammond, K. (2017) Platypeltoides carmenae: A new Nileidae (Trilobita) from the Lower Ordovician (Tremadocian) of Guelmim area;Western Anti-Atlas, Morocco. Museo Geològico del Seminari de Barcelona, Batalleria, 25:20-29 Chirivella Martorell, J.B., Liñán, E., Dies Alvarez, M.E., & Gozalo, R. (2017) Bailiaspis (Trilobita) with English affinities from the Mansilla Formation (Cambrian Series 3 of the Iberian Chains; NE Spain). Spanish Journal of Palaeontology, 32(1):17-26 Rasmussen, B.W., Rasmussen, J.A., & Nielsen, A.T. (2017) Biostratigraphy of the Furongian (upper Cambrian) Alum Shale Formation at Degerhamn, Öland, Sweden. GFF, 139(2):92-118 Amjad, H. Amjad, A., & Garton, E.R. (2017) Wyominge gracilis ayne: G.novum, Sp.novum. A new trilobite from Carboniferous of Appalachia. Abstracts of the Proceedings of the West Virginia Academy of Science 89(1) Pereira, S.R. (2017) Trilobites of the Upper Ordovician of the Central-Iberian Zone of Portugal. Ph.D. Thesis, Universidade de Lisboa, 714 pages 123 plates Kowalczyk, P, (2017) Biostratigraphy of the Cambrian-Ordovician boundary at Krekling, Norway. M.S. Thesis, University of Oslo, 80 pages Laibl, L. (2017) Ontogeny of selected taxa of middle Cambrian trilobites and agnostoids of the Barrandian area. Thesis, Charles University, Prague, 33 pages Mychko, E.V. (2017) Trilobites of the Middle-Upper Carboniferous and Permian of Northern Eurasia. Thesis, Moscow State University, 24 pages Vyhnánková, I. (2017) Morphology of genal caeca in selected trilobites from the Barrandian area. Thesis, Charles University, Prague, 76 pages Bruton, D.L., & Nikolaisen, F. (2017) The homonyms Brachypleura Angelin, 1854 (Trilobita) and Brachypleura Günther, 1862 (Actinopterygii) with discussion of N. P. Angelin's published work. Bulletin of Zoological Nomenclature, 74:138-141
  28. 6 likes
    FOSSIL FRIDAY is Back -Microraptorine dromaeosaurid Microraptor, Liaoning, China Holotype of the Nodosaurid Panoplosaurus mirus at Canadian National Museum Velocriaptor in Ulaanbaatar Mongolia Holotype skull of Zaraapelta nomadis, a beautiful ankylosaur from the Gobi Desert. Crotholus audeti from southern Alberta is possibly the oldest bone-headed dinosaur in the world at the ROM Tyrannosaurid indet aka: Raptorex kriegsteini. Holotype, Tokyo National Museum of Nature & Science Tyrannosaur extracted from Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument in October. Orbital cavity is top right and look at all those teeth in the lower jaw! Large bone (top left) is a femur and there are tail vertebrae beneath the skull. Possibly Teratophoneus curriei Please note the sketal sheet to the left of the jacket. Looks like paleontologists even need help identifying the bones oh yea this is where the teeth belong....... Duckbill Skulls at the ROM, Late Cretaceous Amazing skull and postcranium of the Triassic early archosaur Youngosuchus sinensis, at the IVPP, Beijing, China. Very cool and something you never want to meet in person. Skulls of the iconic South African dinosaur Massospondylus. Early Jurassic sauropods Skelton of the Tarbosaurus that was sold at auction for $1M that was the center of illegal smuggling trade from Mongolia. The irony is that this skeleton had little scientific value since it was poorly cobbled together from a number of specimens and isolated bones.
  29. 6 likes
    I might be wrong, but it looks like something in the vicinity of a drum fish mouth plate...minus the teeth of course.
  30. 6 likes
    Hi @Paleoworld-101 I've collected a couple of distal phalanges from Bothriodont anthracotheres (Bothriodon or Elomeryx) from Hamstead and Bouldnor that closely resemble this. I may be wrong but it looks like it could be the distal phalange from the innermost (first?) finger in the manus, as it matches the size and morphology. Although whether it would be Elomeryx or Bothriodon I don't know. A lot of the turtle phalanges I've seen from the Bouldnor Fm. (haven't found one myself yet) are more 'claw-like' and usually much smaller. Hopefully this helps, Theo
  31. 6 likes
    Just off Twitter, saw this headline A new genus and species of ornithomimosaur, Afromimus tenerensis, is described based on a fragmentary skeleton from the Lower Cretaceous (Aptian—Albian) El Rhaz Formation of Niger. The holotype and only known individual preserves caudal vertebrae, chevrons and portions of the right hind limb. It is a pay-walled paper. Abstract available. http://www.bioone.org/doi/abs/10.5710/AMGH.23.10.2017.3155
  32. 6 likes
    I think I might have another possible answer to the feeding traces on this one. At the suggestion of @MarcoSr, I have been corresponding with Jim Gardner at the Royal Tyrrell Museum regarding some unrelated coprolites I'm studying. Jim is officially one of my new favorite people. In the past, this observant fellow had noticed snails feeding on the surface of dog poop. Since I have never personally witnessed this behavior, I never would have thought of it. He sent me some photos he found online, and the traces match up with at least one of my Triassic treasures. Since then, I have been looking into feeding traces and watching videos of gastropods and chitons. I think there is a possibility that the traces on these coprolites may have been made by radula. I can't find any good photos of chiton feeding traces, but their radula do appear to go from the outside in when grazing as shown here. I don't currently know enough to say for sure that these marks were left by chiton or gastropod radula, but offer it as a possibility since either might feed on algae present on the surface of the poop. I would love to hear what those of you more familiar with mollusks think.
  33. 6 likes
    No edrio there. For future reference the anus/periproct is not in the center, but between the arms closer to the outer edge. In Isorophusella, it looks like a pizza. This pic isn't the greatest to show it, but it is below the center
  34. 6 likes
    Clear laquer is also a good product for mixing with the dust. Use just enough to make a rough paste which can be used as a filler. It dries and hardens well within an hour or so, depending on the size of the cracks. This method works best, however, if you plan on putting a beeswax or similar finish on the ammonite when you're done. Otherwise it may stand out, particularly if the fossil is lightly colored like yours. If worse comes to worst, you can fine tune the color with a bit of water paint.
  35. 6 likes
    Here is a replica of a maxilla from Stenonychosaurus formally known as Troodon. Both the Orginal and replicas are shown. Originals in my collection Painted and unpainted Replicas from the ROM
  36. 6 likes
    Hundreds Of Eggs From Ancient Flying Reptile Are Found In China, The two-Way, NPR, November 30, 2017 https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/11/30/567225493/hundreds-of-eggs-from-ancient-flying-reptile-are-found-in-china Fossilised eggs shed light on reign of pterosaurs, BBC News http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-42177532 Hundreds of Fossilized Pterosaur Eggs Uncovered in China Trilobites Blog, New York Times, November 30, 2017 https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/30/science/pterosaur-eggs.html Pterosaurs, Flying Reptiles, Were a Social Lot, New York Times https://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/17/science/pterosaurs-flying-reptiles-were-a-social-lot.html Yours, Paul H.
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    I agree - it is a Notostracan. Also known as a "tadpole shrimp" or "shield shrimp".
  38. 6 likes
    The UO paleobotanist responded: This appears to be a permineralized cycad, probably Eocene. It is a stunning and very significant specimen, probably a new genus and species.
  39. 6 likes
    Thanks for the compliments! Yes I was a design engineer before I retired, but that was for electronic products. Your story about your 7th grader reminds me of my own 7th grade science project. That was when I still planned to be a paleontologist when I grew up, so I wanted to do something along those lines. Since there were no dinosaurs to be excavated nearby I decided to do the next best thing. I had a pet rabbit that had died a few years earlier and was buried in our backyard, so like a good paleontologist I took shovel in hand and excavated her. Fortunately she was mostly just bones by then. With wire and glue I was able to fit her back together, and although she also looked somewhat pathetic I won first prize. My aghast mother made me bury her again afterwards.
  40. 6 likes
    Crab in the Family Raninidae.
  41. 6 likes
    Some of my Vertebrae Turtle? Cervical 5" long (12.7 cm) Caudal of unknown Theropod Croc or Theropod? Caudal Vertebra
  42. 6 likes
    Hi again Billy, Not sure how much luck you are going to have getting folks to tell you about their fossil sites that require a boat to access without them knowing you first. I would recommend you build up a rapport with folks and hopefully, they will take you out to some of their spots and maybe introduce you to the land owners. I've taken people out before and despite them promising me they wouldn't, they've gone back to my sites without me (and without land owner permission) and decimated the place. Now I'm very selective who I take where, especially after catching someone I trusted with a hand held GPS, marking my spots. Just remember, in VA the property owners own to the "mean low water mark," so if you are standing on land to hunt / collect you are quite probably trespassing. In other states such as MD and NC the property owners own to the "mean high water mark," which means you can actually collect along the beaches. In VA, all of the waterfront land is owned by someone (i.e. federal, state or local government or private land owner.) Good luck. I gave you a few suggestions to start with on your other post. Cheer, SA2
  43. 6 likes
    I was bothered by the idea that I've never seen a septarian nodule having this kind of shape, then I remembered where I have seen it. Maybe, the specimens in question are not to be considered septarian nodules (?), although they present septarian propagation craks. They might be of a similar geologic formation named Thunderegg . To be more specific, there is a variety of Lithophysa core described as "triconoid". See reference . Unfortunately, there is only an external view of a specimen, but the description reveals the other side. Try to search in this direction. (another white night for me)
  44. 6 likes
    @Prey4Me Well, you would not be able to conclude that a particular mindset does not exist on the forum simply on the basis of how you interpret replies in one or two threads. That would be to commit a fallacy. Absolute statements are easiest to invalidate by locating just one counterexample. That aside, the advice so far provided is on the basis of comparison with known types of rock, and the geologic formation in which certain rocks are found. If there is a strong basis for comparison, we can at least reasonably assume that our experienced members who have a wealth of knowledge can say that something is closer to probability 1 or 0. You have been given a few opinions that it is silicified quartz sandstone. Do your tests confirm or deny this? Are your tests the right ones to do this? What has your research on the geologic formation and the silicified rocks told you thus far?
  45. 6 likes
    It's clear that it belongs to a proboscidean, but the angles between the Schreger lines exceed 120 degrees (if I measure correctly) which rule out the possibility of a mammoth tusk. It might be from an elephant like Loxodonta africana.
  46. 5 likes
    I believe that's a piece of Permian concretionary Magnesian Limestone - it quite often turns up as erratics on the Yorkshire coast. Plenty in situ on the Durham coast.
  47. 5 likes
    I'm thinking this might be a holdfast, possibly bryozoan. I have one nearly identical from the Silica formation. When I first found it years ago, I thought it might be fishy, too. I'll try to remember to dig it out tonight and post a pic. Whatever it is, its morphology is distinct and conserved.
  48. 5 likes
    There are definitely some Hildoceras bifrons among them, which means Toarcian and could very well point to southern France where there are a good number of sites which produce such fauna in Causses and Aveyron.
  49. 5 likes
    I think they're stylolites (also spelt styolites) - pressure solution features, which occur on various scales. The mechanism involves mini-slickensiding as one layer sinks down on top of another after some is dissolved away. Like these: http://earthinsightcache.blogspot.co.uk/2010/03/weathered-stylolites-in-silurian.html
  50. 5 likes
    This really, really looks like Delphinodon dividum from the Calvert Formation - probably worth scientific study.
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