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Showing most informative content since 11/12/2017 in all areas

  1. 17 likes
    First up, the seller of this egg stated upfront this is a replica, so this isn't a scam warning. Here, we have an oviraptor egg that could fool even experienced collectors. It looks realistic because it's made out of real oviraptor eggshells. It's even covered with a coating of matrix. This is common practice; I've seen hadrosaur eggs are faked this way, with plaster mixed in to make the egg seem round and heavy. For reference, here's a real Oviraptor (Elongatoolithus sp.) that's been professionally prepped. Oviraptor eggs are commonly faked, so four ways to get a real one is: 1) Get a prepped one, preferably with matrix removed. The eggshell should be black 2) Avoid eggs that are perfect. Real eggs have cracks, and sometimes missing entire chunks of shells. 3) Get one without a matrix base. This isn't a sure-fire method, but I've noticed many fake oviraptor eggs have matrix bases, whereas I can't say the same of those free of matrix. Perhaps the fake eggs require a matrix base for support during their construction process. 4) Price. Again, this is arguable, but the real Oviraptor eggs I've seen often comes with price tag several times that of dubious ones. Having sent some eggs for prepping in the past, this is justified because the cost and time of prepping may cost more than the actual egg. Some scammers like to lure people in with bargain prices. Chinese eggs flood the market, and for many collectors, a dinosaur egg is a must-have. There are more fakes than there are real ones, so take extra care if you seek to buy one. As always, if you're unsure, post pictures here and we will try to help.
  2. 13 likes
    See below from Welton 1993: Your tooth is probably Orthodont and you are seeing the pulp cavity exposed because of tooth damage. Marco Sr.
  3. 11 likes
    Posted are a few concerns I found wandering through the internet. These are but a few examples of the type of issues you may encounter. I send this out as a reminder if you're shopping for fossil presents of any kind. Sellers mis-identify material simply through lack of knowledge but it's up to the buyer to know what they are looking at. Don't hesitate to post interests BEFORE you buy. BUYER BEWARE when it comes to fossils of any kind. Seller wants huge money for this Saurolophus osborni lower arm from the Two Medicine Formation. Looks like a nice arm but some of his facts are incorrect. This species is not found in the Campanian of the Two Medicine Formation but the early Maastrichtian age of the Horseshoe Canyon Formation. Another key point is that it's very difficult to determine taxons from post cranial bones of Hadrosaurs especially in an fauna where multiple species exist. Nice lower arm from somewhere and from some unknown Hadrosaur. What's this seller thinking the "2 Medicine Man Formation" really attention to detail not one of his strong points. Someone tell him its the Two Medicine Formation. Maybe he watches lots of Westerns Seller describes this as Pachycephalosaurus in my opinion it's Thescelosaurus Seller is properly describing this beautiful jaw as Ornithischian but in detail description adds that it was discovered where many Pachycephalosaurus fossils were found giving one the impression it's Pachy. In my opinion it's Thescelosaurus. Teeth of these two species look similar inquire before you buy. I see a lot of these being offered or sale, nice Christmas gift. For those of you that are new to collecting the only thing real here are the crowns. Nice gift Seller is offering this Claw and Identifying it as Velociraptor from the Hell Creek Formation. It's a very worn Anzu wyliei hand claw.
  4. 10 likes
    This appears to be a juvenile domestic pig maxilla, with the first adult tooth (m1) already erupted.
  5. 10 likes
    I know there have been several threads on TFF that talk about storage cabinets for fossils, but since they are all a bit old I will start a new one to describe the storage cabinet I am in the process of making. It's not done yet but I thought I would show progress as I make it. A few things about the design. First, I wanted it to look at least somewhat presentable so I wouldn't have to stash it in some out-of-the-way location in our house. To keep the cost down I am going with oak-veneer plywood for the outside case, not solid oak. I'm using ordinary sanded plywood for the drawers, with solid oak dress panels at the front. The overall dimensions were driven by a couple of factors. First, I don't own a table saw or miter saw, so it had to be something I could make by just using my handheld circular saw. (I use a guide to make long straight cuts.) Also, I don't have a pickup truck so I had to have the 4x8 plywood sheets cut in half at Home Depot so they would fit in my SUV. That limited the maximum dimension to somewhat under 48" (Home Depot saw cuts are pretty atrocious on plywood). I decided to go with a design that had 10 drawers whose inside dimensions are 20x17". The lower two drawers are an inch taller than the rest. I also decided to use drawer slides for a smoother operation when opening the drawers. That meant the overall cabinet design was just about 36" high by 24" wide by 20" deep. Since I'm an engineer by training I felt it necessary to design the entire thing in Visio and use an Excel spreadsheet to calculate the dimensions of each piece, taking into account the exact measured thicknesses of the plywood. Here's what the design looks like: I've been leisurely working on building it for the last couple of weeks and estimate I still have about a week to go. Here's what it looks like so far: Partially assembled, held together by clamps and screws: Drawer design. Note that I have done a somewhat unusual design. Instead of using 1/4" hardboard that is held to the sides by dado cuts (which would be OK if the drawer was for storing lighter things like clothes or towels), I used much more solid 1/2" plywood screwed to the sides. You might question this design, but look closely at the drawer slides and you will see they have "L" shaped ledges that screw to the underside of the drawers. So the drawer slides are supporting the drawers by their bottoms, not their sides. This design is better for holding heavy objects like fossils. To keep the cost down I used inexpensive drawer slides rated for 50lbs each, which should be sufficient for the invertebrate fossils I collect. Now I need to finish gluing and all the sides together, add the top, install the dress panels around the top and bottom, cover the screw holes with wood plugs, cut the drawer dress panels to final size and mount them, stain everything, and add a clear polyurethane coat to finish it off. Should be done by Christmas.
  6. 10 likes
    So, lets figure out vertebrae from the Kem Kem beds. As many of you know the Kem Kem beds has a pretty enigmatic palaeo fauna. There is some literature about it, but not a whole lot. Some of it is behind a paywall and much information is pretty scattered. So I got this idea that maybe we could combine our knowledge and information to collectively get a better picture of which bone belongs to which animal, in this case, vertebrae. I know some of you have some fantastic specimens in your collections, if we combine these in this thread we might be able to see some patterns. We probably won't be able to put a genus or species name on each type, but perhaps assigning certain vertebrae to a morphotype might be possible. With that I encourage everyone that has any vertebrae from the Kem Kem beds to share photos of their specimens and post them here so we can use this thread as a sort of library as well as an ID thread that everyone can use to better ID their Kem Kem vertebrae. So please, share your photos! And it might help to number your specimens for easier reference. I will be updating this first post as new information arises with examples to make ID easier. Theropods Spinosaurus aegyptiacus Spinosaurus is known for it's tall neural spines, which are pretty characteristic. Unlike Sigilmassasaurus, Spinosaurus does not have the ventral triangular rough plateau on the centra Spinosaurus cervical vertebrae Spinosaurus dorsal, sacral and caudal vertebrae Sigilmassasaurus brevicollis Sigilmassasaurus is a Spinosaurid that might be closely related to Baryonyx and Suchomimus. It differs from Spinosaurus in that it has a ventral keel on many vertebrae and a triangular rough plateau on the bottom back end. A is Sigilmassasaurus, B is Baryonyx Sigilmassasaurus cervical vertebrae Sigilmassasaurus dorsal vertebrae Indeterminate Spinosaurid vertebrae Not a whole lot has been published yet, so some bones can probably not be ID'd on genus level. Spinosaurid caudal vertebrae From Paleoworld-101's collection Charcharodontosaurids Due to an old paper Sigilmassasaurus vertebrae are sometimes misidentified as Carcharodontosaurid. These vertebrae should be identified on the basis of the original description by Stromer. Carcharodontosaurid cervical vertebrae Abelisaurids examples needed Deltadromeus agilis better examples needed Sauropods Rebbachisaurus garasbae Not a whole lot is known about this titanosaur, as only a few bones have been found. Notice that the vertebrae are very extensively pneumaticised. Rebbachisaurus dorsal vertebrae Unnamed Titanosaurian mid caudal vertebra Crocodiles more examples needed Kemkemia This crocodile is only known by a single terminal caudal vertebra. Kemkemia caudal vertebra Turtles examples needed Pterosaurs Azhdarchids Azhdarchid (probably Alanqa) posterior fragment cervical vertebra Azhdarchid Mid cervical vertebra Sources Spinosaurids https://peerj.com/articles/1323/?utm_source=TrendMD&utm_campaign=PeerJ_TrendMD_1&utm_medium=TrendMD http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0144695 Sauropods Jeffrey A. Wilson & Ronan Allain (2015) Osteology of Rebbachisaurus garasbae Lavocat, 1954, a diplodocoid (Dinosauria, Sauropoda) from the early Late Cretaceous–aged Kem Kem beds of southeastern Morocco, Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 35:4, e1000701, DOI: 10.1080/02724634.2014.1000701 https://www.researchgate.net/publication/304214496_Evidence_of_a_derived_titanosaurian_Dinosauria_Sauropoda_in_the_Kem_Kem_beds_of_Morocco_with_comments_on_sauropod_paleoecology_in_the_Cretaceous_of_Africa Kemkemia sisn.pagepress.org/index.php/nhs/article/viewFile/nhs.2012.119/32 Pterosaurs https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.thefossilforum.com%2Fapplications%2Fcore%2Finterface%2Ffile%2Fattachment.php%3Fid%3D432009&fname=journal.pone.0010875.PDF&pdf=true https://riviste.unimi.it/index.php/RIPS/article/view/5967
  7. 10 likes
    Yes indeed it is! That periotic is from the sperm whale Aulophyseter morricei.
  8. 10 likes
    So I'll start here with my own Kem Kem vertebrae. Most of the are quite incomplete, which makes identification harder of course. I have a few of them figured out. But others are quite problematic. Here are the side and top views. Gimme a shout if I need to make some better photos of specific specimens. I've numbered all of them for easier reference. Numbers 1 to 3 are all clearly Spinosaurid and likely Sigilmassasaurus due to the small neural process and strong keels. Nr. 2 threw me off a bit since it's so incredibly small but the morphology seems pretty consistent with Sigilmassasaurus. Nr. 4 compared well with a Carcharodontosaurid vertebra @Troodon once posted on the forum, though I still have my doubts if my ID is correct. It's a pretty fragmentary chunk ofc. Nr. 5 looks like a croc cervical to me but it being concave at both ends is throwing me off as most good examples I can find of croc verts have a convex end as well. Nr. 6 should be identifiable as it's a complete neural arch, it seems to compare favourably to the cervicals of some crocs. And the zygapophyses on the front and back seem much to wide and oriented wrong to be Theropod. Nr. 1 Nr. 3 Nr. 7 is my largest Kem Kem vertebra, the size along eliminates a lot of animals. it's much too fat around the middle for any Spinosaurid imo. It seems quite heavily built so I think Sauropods can be ruled out as well. So the only really gigantic animals that are left are Carcharodontosaurids. Nr. 8 is a really weird one that I cannot place. It's quite fat, but also hollow in places and the centrum has one side at an angle. Due to it being hollow makes me think it's Theropod but I haven't been able to find a match yet. Nr. 9 is the back end of a sacrum. It compares pretty well to crocs, it seems fairly heavily built and the centrum is wider than tall. Nr. 10 I bought this one as a Deltadromeus vertebra. But I can't find any good reference of this animal so I dunno. Nr. 11 a dorsal vert with a rather wide neural canal, no clue really. Nr. 12 A nice little fragment, but not very informative. Don't think this can be ID'd Nr. 8 Nr. 9 Nr. 10 Nr. 13 A rather tall caudal vert that compares well with vertebrae attributed to Spinosaurids. But it's hard to find any really good reference. Nr. 14 Really latterally flat caudal vert, theropod? Nr. 15 caudal vert from near the end of the tail, also seems pretty slenderly built. Theropod? Nr. 16 and 17 Though 17 is much more damaged, the centra are the exact same shape. Also fairly slender. Nr. 18 I've posted this weird vertebra on the forum before as it's really bizarre. The centrum has a lateral pinch in the middle and directly above it there is a bulbous area that flares out to the sides. The consensus on the forum was that this is likely from a crocodile. Nr. 19 Another weird caudal from the very end of the tail. What's strange about this one is that the neural canal is really wide. I read somewhere that such a wide neural canal in this area of the tail is common for crocs. Nr. 20 A really small anterior caudal vertebra of a dinosaur. It has some hollow areas and it compares well with Theropods. But I haven't been able to find a good match yet. Judging from the size I'd say this animal was probably no bigger than 2 metres. Nr. 20 So those are my vertebrae from Kem Kem so far. I'd suggest people start posting theirs so we can compare them in the hopes that we might learn more about them.
  9. 10 likes
    I agree that the first one is quite a find. And till now unreported as far as I know from the St Clair area. I believe the second one, which was poorly preserved and only appears more interesting than I believe it to be. Based on the lack of even a crease to show any midveins in the pinnules, leads me to believe they did not have any. The only genus which lacks a midvein is Odontopteris. And the only species of Odontopteris reported at St. Clair is O. subcuneata. I don't know that this species is that "common" there but since O. subcuneata is a polymorphic form Macroneuropteris scheuchzerii and it is a common element in this flora, so it should be readily found there. The other features that can be made out also help confirm the taxon. The first one is very rare even where it is known to exist. So much so it is only described on fertile foliage and only one example of sterile foliage is known to exist. It is called Stellatheca ornata and you have a fertile example. A brief description; The ultimate and penultimate rachis appears wide (though partially due to pinnules being slightly confluent) Each pinnule typically has three sori, but can range from two to five, and are placed near the margin. And the pinnules are generally no more than rounded lobes. Attached is a picture of a Mazon Creek example. Hope this helps, Jack
  10. 10 likes
    Tyrannosaurus rex, the initial indication that a big beast existed. This is the first recorded specimen of a T rex tooth collected in 1874. Displayed at the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History, not described until 1905. Yes other than footprints, dinosaur material has been found in Connecticut. The Jurassic dinosaur skull of Anchisaurus polyzelus, Peabody Museum of Natural History. The label says it all. Type specimen described 1827. The term Dinosaur was coined 1842 by Richard Owens. Did you known that the holes in the dentary of the famous T rex "Sue" were caused by a Trichomonosis like protozoan that may have killed her. Based on other the frequency found on other specimens it's hypothesize that tyrannosaurids were commonly infected by this type of avian parasite. http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0007288 Checkout paper found in Fruitbat's super library. Common Avian Infection Plagued the Tyrant Dinosaurs Ewan D. S. Wolff , Steven W. Salisbury , John R. Horner, David J. Varricchio One of the largest Edmontosaurus annectens. skulls around 50" (127 cm). Museum of the Rockies, Hell Creek Formation, Montana The forelimb of Sinornithosaurus millenii, the first described dromaeosaurid ("raptor") with preserved feathers
  11. 9 likes
    Thanks Well here is what I can say I do not believe it's Postosuchus because they have strong serrations on both edges around 2.4/mm and it's a compressed tooth with a bi-convex base not round on maxillary and dentary positions. However I cannot speak to other crocdylomorphs but typically the teeth would be similar. On the dinosaur side we have several canidates Coelophysis is the best understood. It's teeth have extremely fine serrations with 8 to 9 per mm on the entire distal edge. Anterior serrations vary from the entire edge to just the tip area. Serration density very different than your specimen. Chindesaurus is known from a couple of bones and one incomplete tooth. It's serration count is 5 per mm on both edges. Again a bit different than your specimen , not a good specimen to compare against and I think a Norian age Dino. A final candidate is Daemonosaurus and it might be the best fit but there is limited information published on the teeth. We know, both the premaxillary and anterior dentary teeth are rounded in transverse section with compressed crowns with finely serrated mesial and distal carinae. Hans-Dieter Sues; Sterling J. Nesbitt; David S. Berman & Amy C. Henrici (2011). "A late-surviving basal theropod dinosaur from the latest Triassic of North America". Proceedings of the Royal Society B. 278 (1723): 3459–3464. doi:10.1098/rspb.2011.0410. PMC 3177637 . PMID 21490016 The very late Triassic timeframe works for Daemonosaurus So in the end we really do not have comparative material to make a definitive call just some possibilities. I do however think it's dinosaurian.
  12. 8 likes
    Thaleops ovata Thaleops cranidium ceraurid sp. Isotelus sp. Basiliella barrandei Anataphrus vigilans ceraurid sp. Isotelus sp. Ectenaspis homalonotoides / Failleana indeterminatus Ectenaspis beckeri Ectenaspis beckeri
  13. 8 likes
    Likely a Chinese gomphothere, Cf. Sinomastodon.
  14. 8 likes
    Wow, just saw this thread (I've been in the field all weekend here in SC - it's finally down into the 60s and comfortable outside!). Sorry I'm late to the party. Some various thoughts: 1) Folks who have answered above and failed to identify any anatomical features identifying this as a bone collectively have centuries of experience in avocational AND professional paleontology. I'm one of the professionals on here, have seen quite a lot of bones - and I see a rock. 2) What testing are you referring to? Hardness? Chemistry? These have nothing to do with vertebrate fossil identification and are completely spurious aspects of the physical properties of the object. You claim that nobody here is doing any testing, therefore casting doubt on the relevance of their opinions - but I ask - what relevant observations do you have? 3) As a followup to that, if you already have your mind made up, and don't want/care to hear what the good folks on this forum have to say, then why are you here asking us? Sorry to be so frank. 4) Lastly, I'll place the burden of proof back on you where it rightfully belongs (since it's your hypothesis you're trying to support). What proof do you have that this is bone? What specific anatomical features tell you it is bone? Does it have a marrow cavity? Does it have primary/secondary osteons? What kind of bone is it, histologically speaking? Where are the classic surficial features indicating that it is in fact a bone (e.g. pores, foramina, articular surfaces, sutural surfaces, etc.)? Which bone in the body is it? Which species does it represent? What synapomorphies are obvious that lend themselves to your identification? Please answer these questions carefully for us. A well-articulated, informative, and thoughtful presentation of this information is the best way to propose a hypothesis like yours. We all look forward to your answers to #4 and I guarantee all of us will listen to you without prejudice.
  15. 7 likes
    It’s not a claw but a cuttlefish prong, probably Belosaepia. Most likely Eocene,
  16. 7 likes
    I think it is a basal part of a hybodont shark tooth (probably Egertonodus). Is it from Wealden beds? I think I could have seen your specimen on the auction site. I also have similar hybodont teeth from the same location. Their labial side is strongly striated. Example
  17. 7 likes
    Flexicalymene ouzregui from Morocco. Ordovician in age, likely from the Anti-Atlas Mountain region.
  18. 7 likes
    There are several places in China where you can find horseshoe crabs - Yunnanolimulus luopingensis Zhang, Hu, Zhou, Lu & Bai, 2009 from the Triassic of Yunnan seems to be the most common.l Weichangopsis from the Cretaceous of Liaoning has two soft tail spines - Yunnanolimulus got only one hard spine.
  19. 7 likes
    Looks a bit like a Triops to me. So yeah, not a Horseshoe crab.
  20. 7 likes
    Hey Hi Boys and Girls, Ladies and gentlemen, and all others! I have noticed that the phrase "It is just a rock" is used quite often when a non fossil rock is posted for an ID. I think that this is a bad choice of wording that can cause confusion. Most fossils and all trace fossils can be described as being just a rock also. (lithified life) I humbly request that We refrain from using this terminology to describe a non fossil rock. Regards, Tony
  21. 7 likes
    Good point, @ynot. I've been guilty of having used that phrase on occasion in the past, so your point is very well taken. It is better if we can be more precise (such as in calling something a concretion, a piece of oolite, etc.). In future, perhaps instead of saying "just a rock" we can say "not a fossil." And, of course, for our geology-savvy members who enjoy collecting rocks and minerals in general (whether or not they are fossils), I suppose calling a non-fossil "just a rock" sounds kind of pejorative since even non-fossil rocks are interesting. We don't want to diminish or disparage those who take delight in collecting non-fossil rocks and minerals.
  22. 7 likes
    There are a lot of different types of "sandstone". Some are very frail while others are quite stable. It depends on the mineral makeup of the "sand" and of the bonding mineral/method. What type of metal "wire wheel" are You using? (brass, iron, other) Your method to determine "hardness" is flawed and will not give any reliable results. Google "mohs hardness test" to learn about mineral hardness. This method is used for mineral specimens and does not work for most rock types because they are made of several minerals. As others have said, this forum has a lot of experience with rock and fossil. Some pieces are easy for Us to identify because We have seen a lot of it. That does not mean We are not open minded, just experienced. Check out this thread to see how "open minded scientific" The Fossil Forum can be. Kind regards, Tony
  23. 7 likes
    The taxa may be differentiated. Clean out the foramina and photograph them and any remaining muscle attachments. Not real close-ups, but close enough to still locate these features on the bone.
  24. 6 likes
    The Twitter Paleontology World post cool images of fossils on Friday so I'm happy to steal from them and share some dinosaur ones with this forum Holotype specimen of the short-faced dromaeosaur Atrociraptor from the Horseshoe Canyon Fm of Alberta - ROM Oviraptorid Skull, Mongolia, Rinchenia mongoliensis AMNH Protoceratops andrewsi 3 Year old Tarbosaurus, Mongolia Skeleton of Baryonyx Amargasaurus, from Museo Paleontológico Egidio Feruglio, Patagonia, Argentina is a Sauropod. Diabloceratops holotype skull natural history museum of Utah Daspletosaurus maxilla -Tyrrell
  25. 6 likes
    No edrio there. For future reference the anus/periproct is not in the center, but between the arms closer to the outer edge. In Isorophusella, it looks like a pizza. This pic isn't the greatest to show it, but it is below the center
  26. 6 likes
    Clear laquer is also a good product for mixing with the dust. Use just enough to make a rough paste which can be used as a filler. It dries and hardens well within an hour or so, depending on the size of the cracks. This method works best, however, if you plan on putting a beeswax or similar finish on the ammonite when you're done. Otherwise it may stand out, particularly if the fossil is lightly colored like yours. If worse comes to worst, you can fine tune the color with a bit of water paint.
  27. 6 likes
    Here is a replica of a maxilla from Stenonychosaurus formally known as Troodon. Both the Orginal and replicas are shown. Originals in my collection Painted and unpainted Replicas from the ROM
  28. 6 likes
    Hundreds Of Eggs From Ancient Flying Reptile Are Found In China, The two-Way, NPR, November 30, 2017 https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/11/30/567225493/hundreds-of-eggs-from-ancient-flying-reptile-are-found-in-china Fossilised eggs shed light on reign of pterosaurs, BBC News http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-42177532 Hundreds of Fossilized Pterosaur Eggs Uncovered in China Trilobites Blog, New York Times, November 30, 2017 https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/30/science/pterosaur-eggs.html Pterosaurs, Flying Reptiles, Were a Social Lot, New York Times https://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/17/science/pterosaurs-flying-reptiles-were-a-social-lot.html Yours, Paul H.
  29. 6 likes
    I agree - it is a Notostracan. Also known as a "tadpole shrimp" or "shield shrimp".
  30. 6 likes
    The UO paleobotanist responded: This appears to be a permineralized cycad, probably Eocene. It is a stunning and very significant specimen, probably a new genus and species.
  31. 6 likes
    My wife and I went up to Bakersfield this past weekend with my parents. My parents were visiting from Florida, and since they are interested in fossils too we all went to Ernst Quarries on Friday, Nov 10. This was my parents' first time digging for ancient shark teeth so they struggled to find teeth at first. My mom is in her late 60's with arthritis and she didn't do any hunting even though we paid for her to go in the premium area. She did some sifting through the tailings, but really spent most of her time socializing with the other diggers, found out about their lives, what they did for work, etc. Then she would come back, tell us some old stories and entertained us while we hunted for teeth. I found some nice teeth, mostly mako's, but also walked around, checked out some other areas. My wife on the other hand picked a spot, and sat there hammering and chiselling away the whole morning, on the same spot. Shortly after noon, we were all hunting for teeth quietly. All of a sudden my wife, calm but in a rapid voice, said "Jesse". There was this restrained excitement in her voice, "check this out" she said. I jumped out from my hole immediately and let out a nervous chuckle. My mom perked up and asked "What is it?" I had not seen it yet but with some resignation I told her, "she found a meg." And indeed she had. My wife, hammering and chiselling away big chunks of layer at a time, had uncovered the tip of a meg. A whole chunk of layer had fallen out, and right there in the center of it was this fat tip, half an inch long, sticking out, serrated on both sides. We were elated. Every since we started digging for shark teeth 2 years ago, we have gone to Bakersfield at least 30 separate times, sometimes digging for 2 and 3 days at a time. We have moved at least 100 tons of dirt with a shovel. When I go digging, all I want is to find a meg. I have found chunks of 3 different megs, a half tooth here, a 1 inch piece there. Earlier this year my wife found a small meg, ~2.5 inches with part of the root missing. But we have never found a big Meg, let alone intact. Now my wife steps away from her spot, hands me a small brush and asks me to uncover it. After the initial shock and excitement of finding that serrated tip sticking out, the real drama begins. Your heart is racing, all kinds of thoughts flash through your mind: Is it whole? Oh please let it be whole, does it have a root? You are so excited, you want to get it out as soon as you can, but you don't want to damage it by accident, so you take all this extra care, which takes more time, and in turn makes you even more anxious and desperate. The people around you, watching you brush it off, are also excited and anxious. Finally, the tooth brakes free! It is whole! I pick it up with my gloved hands and my first thought is how heavy it is. Can't believe I am finally holding one. It looks great, I feel pure happiness. I got a meg everybody! After the initially euphoria, we wrapped the meg in a towel and put it inside a box to take it home. We have been starring at it every night and every morning ever since. I still can't believe we found a meg. My wife thought that once we found a meg, my consuming obsession with fossil shark teeth would subside. But finding this meg has only stoked the fire, now I want to go dig even more and find more meg teeth!
  32. 6 likes
    Crab in the Family Raninidae.
  33. 6 likes
    Some of my Vertebrae Turtle? Cervical 5" long (12.7 cm) Caudal of unknown Theropod Croc or Theropod? Caudal Vertebra
  34. 6 likes
    Hi again Billy, Not sure how much luck you are going to have getting folks to tell you about their fossil sites that require a boat to access without them knowing you first. I would recommend you build up a rapport with folks and hopefully, they will take you out to some of their spots and maybe introduce you to the land owners. I've taken people out before and despite them promising me they wouldn't, they've gone back to my sites without me (and without land owner permission) and decimated the place. Now I'm very selective who I take where, especially after catching someone I trusted with a hand held GPS, marking my spots. Just remember, in VA the property owners own to the "mean low water mark," so if you are standing on land to hunt / collect you are quite probably trespassing. In other states such as MD and NC the property owners own to the "mean high water mark," which means you can actually collect along the beaches. In VA, all of the waterfront land is owned by someone (i.e. federal, state or local government or private land owner.) Good luck. I gave you a few suggestions to start with on your other post. Cheer, SA2
  35. 6 likes
    I was bothered by the idea that I've never seen a septarian nodule having this kind of shape, then I remembered where I have seen it. Maybe, the specimens in question are not to be considered septarian nodules (?), although they present septarian propagation craks. They might be of a similar geologic formation named Thunderegg . To be more specific, there is a variety of Lithophysa core described as "triconoid". See reference . Unfortunately, there is only an external view of a specimen, but the description reveals the other side. Try to search in this direction. (another white night for me)
  36. 6 likes
    @Prey4Me Well, you would not be able to conclude that a particular mindset does not exist on the forum simply on the basis of how you interpret replies in one or two threads. That would be to commit a fallacy. Absolute statements are easiest to invalidate by locating just one counterexample. That aside, the advice so far provided is on the basis of comparison with known types of rock, and the geologic formation in which certain rocks are found. If there is a strong basis for comparison, we can at least reasonably assume that our experienced members who have a wealth of knowledge can say that something is closer to probability 1 or 0. You have been given a few opinions that it is silicified quartz sandstone. Do your tests confirm or deny this? Are your tests the right ones to do this? What has your research on the geologic formation and the silicified rocks told you thus far?
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    It's clear that it belongs to a proboscidean, but the angles between the Schreger lines exceed 120 degrees (if I measure correctly) which rule out the possibility of a mammoth tusk. It might be from an elephant like Loxodonta africana.
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    Young, G.C. (1978) A new early Devonian petalichthyid fish from the Taemas / Wee Jasper region of New South Wales. Alcheringa, 2(2):103-116 Young, G.C. (1979) New information on the structure and relationships of Buchanosteus (Placodermi: Euarthrodira) from the Early Devonian of New South Wales. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, 66(4):309-352 PDF LINK Young, G.C. (1981) New early Devonian brachythoracids (placoderm fishes) from the Taemas-Wee Jasper region of New South Wales. Alcheringa, 5(4):245-271 PDF LINK Young, G.C. (1984) Further petalichthyid remains (Placoderm fishes, Early Devonian) from the Taemas-Wee Jasper Region, New South Wales. Journal of Australian Geology & Geophysics, 9(2):121-131 PDF LINK Young, G.C. (2004) Large brachythoracid arthrodires (placoderm fishes) from the early Devonian of Wee Jasper, New South Wales, Australia, with a discussion of basal brachythoracid characters. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 24(1):1-17 PDF LINK Young, G.C. (2009) New arthrodires (Family Williamsaspididae) from Wee Jasper, New South Wales (Early Devonian), with comments on placoderm morphology and palaeoecology. Acta Zoologica, 90(1):69-82 PDF LINK Hunt, J.R., & Young, G.C. (2011) A new placoderm fish of uncertain affinity from the Early–Middle Devonian Hatchery Creek succession at Wee Jasper, New South Wales. Alcheringa, 35(1):53-75 PDF LINK
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    I don't have any personally, but if you're planning to be in the vicinity of Castelnuovo Berardenga Scalo, Asciano (Siena Province) Italy in the near future, there is apparently an open quarry where they're abundant! Here's a link to an article that you might find interesting: Fulgosi, F.C., et al. (2009). A small fossil fish fauna, rich in Chlamydoselachus teeth, from the Late Pliocene of Tuscany (Siena, central Italy). Cainozoic Research, 6(1-2). -Joe
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    so shale wouldn't be sedimentary? Underneath:A strictly morphological classification of fish scales.
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    Hi Travis- Welcome. The area looks like it is Oligocene, according the latest state geology map. But the rocks don't look too Oligocene to me. Based on the geology map, it should not be a dinosaur bone, but it does look like a big ole fossil bone to me. And it looks pretty big. I imagine that this thing will want to fall apart as you dig it up. The rock is the only thing holding it together. Notice how it is mostly missing where there is no rock. It would need to be professionally collected. The question you raise about not being sure if it is worth the effort... this is something we may never know without a bit of exploratory digging. I get to the Front Range quite often, but this is well east of I-25, otherwise I wouldn't mind stopping by for a looksee. edit: I was also looking at the same map, but it gets weird right there where you circled it in red. This one is better: https://ngmdb.usgs.gov/Prodesc/proddesc_68589.htm It is labeled as 'To' which is indeed NOT Oligocene, but Ogallala Fm, which is Miocene. So, about 15 million years old. Still no dinosaur, but there were some big mammals around at the time.
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    If they were found in close proximity (a cm or so) they are probably associated. Often the stapes is found stuck into the periotic still.
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    Gary I found a similar tooth this past summer and initially thought carnivore as well but it ended up being peccary. The enamel (or where its lacking) and peculiar wear surface/facet that results from the upper and lower canine "self-sharpening" each other led me to conclude my tooth was an upper canine. Yours appears to be a lower right canine based on what I perceive as the sharpened surface or facet at the tip. (A second look and I can't say from the photos if its upper or lower.) I found this article helpful... https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/tetrapod-zoology/peccary-teeth-are-scary/ Particularly this illustration...
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    Can you get a closer, better quality picture of this part? There is some bone that can look a bit like this, all crumbly and red, but I can’t tell from this pic if that is what it is. And this area. There is a hole there on the left too that looked dark red, kind of rusty. A shot of that may be helpful. It looks a bit like concrete, but more like a conglomerate to me. That could just be the lighting though. I am not sure I have ever seen a conglomerate with stoned of that nature with bone in it though. It has a more mineral rich appearance to it than I would expect to see in concrete. It has a rusty orange, iron laden look to it. The part that could be lighting is the green appearing pebbles. The color can be from copper, which I wouldn’t expect in concrete either. But I can’t tell from the pic if it is copper rich.
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    Photos below shows the "lifting boards" being placed under and secured to the jacket. Note, everyone standing around, psyching themselves up for the "big" lift. Once we lifted it, we had to walk it out to the boat which couldn't come but so close to the beach in order to make sure it was still floating after we put this on the bow. Chip (in the orange hat) was nice enough to come over from Stratford Hall Plantation to help us with the lift and carry. (There aren't any photos or video of that because everyone was busy. Even Mrs.SA2 had her hands full holding the boat steady and making sure it didn't bottom out under the weight.) Once on the boat, we loaded everyone up and headed back to Westmoreland State Park's boat ramp for the off load. This of course is when the wind picked up and shifted directions causing some swells to build. And of course, the trip wouldn't be complete without us spying another poacher looking for fossils while trespassing under the cliffs, heading towards where we just recovered the skull. He had already walked past 2 No Trespassing signs to get to where we saw him. Once the skull was unloaded, we took the Ranger out in the boat to make contact with the gentleman. We were very happy to see one of the Rangers (Kenny) from Westmoreland State Park along with another staffer (Luke) waiting for us at the Boat Ramp! They had the tractor and a trailer for off load and transport. We made it! Orlin (on right) and I get the jacket rigged up for lifting while Marco Jr. and Mel discuss weight distribution and strap placement. Certainly didn't want to snap it in half at this point. Once rigged up, our Ranger buddy from the Park (Kenny) did his thing with their tractor while Marco Jr. supervised the lift and carry. How cool is That! Not only does Kenny have a gun, badge and ticket book, but he also has a big tractor to play with. Here is the precious cargo being secured to the trailer for transport by Luke to the Park's garage. A bunch of Park visitors saw all of us dirty folks come in to the ramp with the bow riding low in the water and came over to see what all the commotion was about. The Park is storing the skull and extra-cranial bones until the preparation can be finished and then it will be on display in their Visitors Center. Here is the boat back on the trailer, waiting to be cleaned up and readied for the next adventure. It truly was a great thrill and honor for Mrs.SA2 and I to be invited and involved in such a worthy endeavor. Working with Marco Sr. and his boys was great and we learned a lot. We really are looking forward to the next time they call and say, "Hey, you guys want to help us to..............?" Over the coming winter she and I will edit the video clips into a continuous loop showing the process start to finish, work with Marco Sr. and his sons to write the text explaining the process, figure out who is going to do the narration, record the audio portion and then publish the finished video. I'll add to this post once the display is set up for the public. Cheers. SA2 / Mrs.SA2 / Daleksek (Trevor)
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    I've contacted Lance Grande - that's what he said: "It is definitely a lizard. Hard to say what kind, though, based on a partial skin. I know bones do not normally preserve at this particular locality of the GRF, but this could also possibly be a shed skin." Thomas
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    I have been a part of this forum for about three years. The people here have taught me more than I could have ever imagined. They are about as open minded as you get. Many times we (those of us who post something) come in with preconceived notions of what we have. In order to learn, we have to let go of that and be open to the ideas of others. There is such a cumulative wealth of knowledge here, both professional and novice. Being wrong is part of learning. Trust me, the people here on the forum know bone and tooth material when they see it. While not an expert in bone and tooth material, I can tell by the lack of cellular structure you do not have bone. Holes can form under many conditions - boring clams and sponges are just a couple of examples.
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    Very nice find! This item appears to be a partial cetacean periotic bone -- part of a bone in the inner ear of a whale. The concentric grooves are the coiling of the cochlear canal.
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