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Showing most informative content on 02/17/2018 in all areas

  1. 4 likes
    Utahs top Paleontologist Jim Kirkland posted this chart on the dinosaur fauna in his state. Pretty amazing diversity
  2. 4 likes
    I saw this on a number of different posts by the Tyrrell and thought it would interest our members. Clips and photos courtesy of RTMP. The Royal Tyrrell Museum collection includes one of the best-preserved Daspletosaurus theropod skulls. The skull is unique in that it is a disarticulated skull, where all the bones were found separately and were not crushed flat during fossilization. Daspletosaurus was a large tyrannosaur that lived 77.3 – 75 million years ago in Alberta and is closely related to Tyrannosaurus rex. The left maxilla (upper jaw). Note the teeth at various stages of growth. Dinosaurs continually replaced their teeth throughout their lives why the different sizes in the jaw The skull bones of the Daspletosaurus torosus were first discovered in 2000 near the Milk River in southern Alberta, and it took until 2011 for all the pieces to be collected. Since the individual pieces of the skull were separated, it was not obvious where each bone was located in the quarry. Researchers waited until further pieces of the skull eroded out of the ground, rather than searching for them. The left pre-maxilla (front of the upper jaw) in the field. Left pre-maxilla (front of the upper jaw) prepared. As fossil bones are extremely fragile and often heavy, they can be difficult to manipulate and handle. That makes it difficult for researchers to study certain specimens, or for them to be displayed. Although they have the majority of the skull of Daspletosaurus torosus in our collection, it is too fragile to piece back together. As a solution, they decided to create a cast and display it as an exploded skull. Exploded skulls are a common tool used to teach anatomy, allowing for examination of the individual pieces of a skull. This will allow researchers to examine all the bones that make up a theropod skull from multiple angles. Since certain pieces of this skull of Daspletosaurus torosus are too delicate to be cast using traditional methods, they created a digital model of the skull using photogrammetry. By taking multiple photos of each piece, their technicians were able to create digital models of the skull that were then 3D printed. This project is the first time the Museum has 3D printed a cast of a specimen and it was very successful. To show all 41 bones of the skull of Daspletosaurus torosus, they mounted the cast as an exploding skull. They suspended the specimen in the air to determine the position of the pieces. Once the positions were finalized, a mount was constructed to hold the specimen A mount is then created. Daspletosaurus torosus is now on display! This display was one of their most difficult and technical projects yet, using new technologies and artistic techniques to create the cast and mount. As far as they know, it is the only exploded dinosaur skull in the world Photo of player Found that the player moves quite fast. Move the forward > with your finger for better results DWLAqm2XcAEohbq.mp4
  3. 3 likes
    One of the Trigoniidae, possibly Pterotrigonia. sp?
  4. 3 likes
    First bivalve is an Inoceramus I believe, Cretaceous in age.
  5. 3 likes
    Welcome to the Forum. Definitely a Pecopteris sp. from the Rhode Island formation, Narragansett Basin. There is a plant site in Rhode Island, about 1/2 hour south of Somerset, in Portsmouth. The preservation is better in your specimen, though. Not as distorted. Also, there are some quarries about 45 minutes to the north west, in Plainville, Mass., that have produced plant fossils. I wouldn't be surprised if there were outcrops throughout that range, that may have been disturbed or uncovered by construction and farming in the area. (New England is famous for growing rocks in farmer's fields. ) Great example! Thanks for posting it. Regards,
  6. 2 likes
    As stated here, location is most important information needed. I'm not seeing anything to indicate that it is a coprolite. You could try touching it to the tip of your tongue to see if it sticks. If it does not, it is doubtful.
  7. 2 likes
    Did you find it in a fossil site or near a place known for its fossils? Looks more like a rock to me...
  8. 2 likes
    Several of these later ones look like oysters of some kind, the top one here very Ostrea sp. like.
  9. 2 likes
    Maybe a species of Pleuromya ?
  10. 2 likes
    This one looks like Gryphaea, perhaps G. newberryi.
  11. 2 likes
    It's a pretty diverse fauna. the Kem Kem consists of the three formations on the right. The Akrabou is basically marine
  12. 2 likes
    You might want to try making an acetate peel. Here's some information on how it's done. http://woostergeologists.scotblogs.wooster.edu/2015/05/01/woosters-fossil-of-the-week-how-to-make-brilliant-acetate-peels-with-a-jurassic-coral-example/ Here's an example from the linked page-
  13. 1 like
    Hi.... I'm afraid theres no easy quick fix to get results in prepping but your on the right track by finding some practice pieces to work on.... The guys are right you need to practice skimming the rock off as described in detail in my fossil prep thread.... Your looking for a colour change from light grey matrix to a lighter calcite colour.... You can see this colour change below on the shell I'm currently working on and roughing out pictured below ....At this stage you could if you had one air abraid the remaining matrix off or like myself use various grades of wet n dry sand paper to clean off the remaining rock layer.... Getting closer to the fossil try cubing with a grinder and diamond cutting disc or get the Ken Mannion SQ as pictured above... brilliant tool' or a cheaper alternative you can find on ebay that would do a similar job which I used for ages before I got this... again pictured in the fossil prep thread.... Good luck.... I dont get notifications via email, anymore for some reason your lucky I just happened to of signed in.... Steve....
  14. 1 like
    It looks like Flowstone or similar deposition in cave. (speleothem)
  15. 1 like
    I can assure you that this one is a bivalve of some sort. It may not be a fossil, but only because there is a chance that this one is modern.
  16. 1 like
    I say yes, things can mineralize or be stained by tannins quickly and gain weight through mineralization on the outer layers quickly. I learned that the hard way.
  17. 1 like
  18. 1 like
    My first attempt at thin slicing to identify rugose corals. Used a tile saw and a belt sander followed by sand paper. I think I can see enough of what I need to for identification of this specimen, but I think I'm going to invest in a flat lapidary grinder and a diamond embedded wheel. I'm tired of putting corals into the collection with only coarse identification. Here's the poor-man's version / first attempt of a thin slice (obviously needs to be a lot thinner).
  19. 1 like
    Jerry that does sound like fun for an old fossil hound like myself. Right now I am in CA and looking at Topanga Canyon and the Santa Monica Mountains. Will be checking out some local collections tomorrow. Looking forward to that! this is me >>> https://www.facebook.com/PaleontologyGroup/ I am in a hotel close to Fossil Ridge. It caught my eye
  20. 1 like
    Agreed matrix looks like it's from Khouribga Dorsal from Plesiosaur. Centrum pretty round. Croc?
  21. 1 like
    You made an almost identical request for this piece back in August.
  22. 1 like
    There are very nice Beekite rings on the specimens (visible mostly in the last picture). (just to add)
  23. 1 like
    Yup that's a lower left mosasaur jaw from Khouribga, Morocco. Not the complete jaw though, this is the dentary bone. The exposed area is the inside of the mouth. The mosasaurs are quite a large group of animals. They are most closely related to snakes and lizards. They are large bodied marine reptiles. They basically look like big lizards, but instead of feet, they have fins. Identifying the exact species can be quite hard with mosasaurs. This one looks like it might be Eremiasaurus heterodontus due to the difference in dentition front to back. The teeth are quite slender and have smooth enamel, which also fits with that ID. Though I wouldn't rule out the possibility of it being Prognathodon sp.
  24. 1 like
    I use similar ones as RB shows. And diamond wheels on a Dremel for bigger carbide tips (PaleoTools tips).
  25. 1 like
    **** UPDATE! **** The "Fossilsites" website is back up, with a different URL. You can find it here, at http://www.fossilspot.com/index.html. It is nearly, (if not completely) identical to Donald Kenney's Fossil web page.
  26. 1 like
    Wow! I grew up in Assonet. Never found anything like that. Some old walls were built there with imported stone, so no absolute guarantee it originated there. Welcome to the forum.
  27. 1 like
  28. 1 like
    Dyed is usually a term used when referring to purposely coloring something. I think your teeth probably were in an iron rich environment at some time. The teeth where I have been digging lately have colors ranging from yellows, reds, sable browns and greys all because of the different minerals in the soil.
  29. 1 like
  30. 1 like
    Looks like a wad of chewing gum with a chunk of something sticking out.
  31. 1 like
    Troodontids certainly are one of my favorite dinosaur families. Intelligent and what a set of chompers to eat you with, all you can ask for in a cool dinosaur. Will start this with the Pectinodon teeth in my collection and will continue to add as I take photos. This species has some of the coolest teeth. Pectinodon bakkeri is the only named Troodontid in the Hell Creek and Lance Formations. This is a tooth taxon and its teeth are significantly much smaller than its big cousin Stenonychosaurus. Lance Formation Hell Creek Formation A couple of the teeth in matrix are partially rooted which is extremely rare since the teeth are so small Hell Creek Formation - Powder River County Hell Creek Formation
  32. 1 like
    I think the Calvert Cliffs have only Miocene formations so it can't be Pliosaur.Also Pliosaur teeth are usually more slender. It must be either croc or whale tooth.
  33. 1 like
    My other mailbox score this week was this Wooly Rhino tooth. Again I am out of State so it had to be opened for me. I hate when that happens.
  34. 1 like
    Very nice to see Doren has been down his crab mine again. I have one from him and I really love it too. One thing i have noticed about this thread, there is a lot of gifts sent to members of the TFF from members of the TFF . What a great forum .
  35. 1 like
    Hell Creek Formation - South Dakota Hell Creek Formation - North Dakota
  36. 1 like
    Hell Creek Formation - Montana Garfield County Carter County Powder River County
  37. 1 like
    Judith River Formation Cranial Troodontid material from North America is exception rare with only a few isolated fragments found. Here is a Maxilla with teeth that has been made available to the ROM to be studied. ROM X-ray Following are not associated with the maxilla Cool wear facet Two Medicine Formation
  38. 1 like
    Well, the patron saint of palaeontologists, @Nimravis has really blessed my mailbox this time. WOW!
  39. 1 like
    Hi all I got a gift from my friend today containing some ammonites .Very pleased. All the ammonites were collected in 1950s and most of them are from lost localities. I will be add a full IDs when I repost them on my best ammonite collection thread . Liparoceras Bechiiceras Gallicum Tmetoceras Scissum Andrognoceras Microconch Echioceras cheers Bobby
  40. 1 like
    TFF members are truly kind, generous folks. I received an incredible surprise today from our own @Darktooth who sent it just because that is just the type of epic awesome sauce that he is. I've been quietly pining for one of these big bad boys for a while now after I had received some lovely fragments. This one is nearly complete, the classic Devonian Homalonotid, Dipleura dekayi from the state of NY. The segmentation is crisp and stunning, and the smooth pygidium tucked beneath sports a speckled appearance. This one measures a nice 10 cm (~4") along the axial. I just love the shovel/snout shape of the tip of the cephalon. This makes my week! This will definitely be occupying premium real estate on my WIP trilobite display area.
  41. 1 like
  42. 1 like
    Well, I cut a slice. Wow, that's hard stuff. Took a half hour to cut through it. Here's the slice wet.
  43. 1 like
    Hello, these teeth were sold to me as a mix of Triceratops and hadrosaur spitter teeth from Hell Creek Formation of Montana. Thanks to @Troodon, I now know these kinda teeth are ceratopsian spitter. Is there any way to tell if they belong to Triceratops, or any of ceratopsians such as Leptoceratops? Also, teeth 4 and 5 are unusually shiny. At the right angle, parts of them almost seem to be bronze. Are they pyritized? If so, is this common for Hell Creek teeth? Thank you for your time. Teeth 4 Teeth 5
  44. 1 like
    Just arrived. 2 pound piece of rough agatized dinosaur bone. Can't wait to slice and polish. Been wanting one of these for a long time and finally got around to buying one!
  45. 1 like
    New acquisition from an online auction (no, not that one ) A Carcharodontosaur anterior tooth.
  46. 1 like
    One more thought, the industry both collectors and dealers calls all these type of teeth Triceratops spitters. I've even heard paleontologists use that name. Its just the standard jargon for these fragmented teeth. Scientifically they are Ceratopsian since you cannot distinguishing between species. Never heard anyone comment on pyritized spitters not to say they aren't. @jpc
  47. 1 like
    This tooth is the biggest tooth I have seen come out of Cuba, it is a huge primary tooth. I will have to get Matty Swilp to restore the tooth when it arrives.
  48. 1 like
    Heh. Snow gets in the way of getting out in the field, so naturally I am averse to it. Commuting in lake-effect blizzards is not terribly fun, either. At least the cold is nowhere near as bad as it was growing up in Ottawa. I can in no way fault the packaging: it was expertly suspended, and would have endured the usual shocks, bumps, and dumps of parcel delivery. This seemed as though it went through a much more "vigorous" delivery process, possibly due to carelessness on the part of someone along the delivery chain. @FossilDAWG: sure thing! I was possibly thinking celebra due to that nodular part of the glabella (although I would be dead wrong in saying Flexicalymene).
  49. 1 like
    Fisherites and Receptaculites are both valid genera. Finney & Niticki (1979) (link for those who can get JSTOR) described Fisherites [type species F. reticulatus (Owen, 1844)] and distinguished it from Receptaculites (for example, R. neptuni) based on a number of features but primarilily the way growth introduces new elements into the thallus, affecting the arrangement of components and the "sunflower"-like pattern. Don
  50. 1 like
    exactly, and the insect might not have died in there, but the wings may have been brought in by another insect or spider, something smaller. I am often amazed at how many insects, spiders and mites we find deep in rocks when excavating. If the layers are even just a wee bit separated, puny critters will find their way in there. The photos just look like modern wings to me.
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