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Showing most informative content on 05/22/2018 in all areas

  1. 7 likes
    Hipockets is right, it is a chamber from Aturia, a nautiloid. This is a very nice example.
  2. 5 likes
    Looks similar to a chamber cast from a cephlapod of sort.
  3. 5 likes
    Some of these site rules are very odd. Amazon will send me DVDs, in their cases, but won't send empty DVD cases to Morocco.
  4. 4 likes
  5. 3 likes
    This past Saturday I only had time for a quick hunt due to things that needed to get done around the house. Also it was raining and I had the boys with me. I almost wasn't going to go but the siren song of sweet treasures were calling me, beckoning me to come and find them. I decided to hit up both Briggs road and Deep Springs. I hunted both sites in under an hour and a half. I didn't find much and was mostly surface collecting. The boys found a few things. I did manage to find a my first decent size Dipleura cephalon from Briggs. The past few hunts there I have been finding more and more Dipleura kibbles -n- bits. It is raising my hopes of finding a complete one there. When I got to Deep Springs it looked almost exactly as it was when I left there from the TFF group hunt. It looks like an asteroid hit it! There are plenty off slabs and hash plates laying everywhere. I found a decent Dipleura cephalon from here too, that I think I will try prepping. There wasnt anything else that I really wanted to bring home so I was getting ready to leave but decided to take one last look. It seems that everytime I do this here I find a greenops. Sure enough, I spot one just lying on top of the debris. I really can't believe I spotted it. Even though it was a short hunt and nothing spectacular was found it was nice to be out there.
  6. 3 likes
    Both of yours are certainly order Rhynchonellida (as is Cyclothyris). That's the easy part. Hiscobeccus belongs to the early subfamily Rhynchotrematinae which became extinct in the Devonian. If it is likely you have rocks going back that far near your Cretaceous outcrop it could be any one of a gazillion species! Cyclothyris isn't always wide, for example C. globosa. (not that yours is this) Rhynchonellids are extremely hard to id without internal structure and/or an exact formation. This photographer had the same problem with your location. http://earthphysicsteaching.homestead.com/Mesozoic_Brachiopods_2.html In short, I'm not sure what they are , other than rhynchonellids.
  7. 2 likes
    Just to head this one off before we get there-- If anybody has input to question number 1 above, please consider this. If you've had (what you believe to be) a great experience (and transaction) directly with dealers in Morocco or middlemen dealers (including our favorite auction site) feel free to give them props here if they've gone out of their way to be helpful. If you've had a less than satisfactory transaction (which can happen with Kem Kem material) let's try to inform the original poster with a PM to keep that information private. Though it may seem like a "public service" to "out" dealers who offer sham fossils or wildly mislabeled items, shaming them on this public forum can open TFF open to liability issues (even if the criticism is well deserved). TFF has enough funds to pay for hosting (thanks to generous forum-benefitting auctions) but not to defend itself from a defamation lawsuit (even if frivolous). As for question 2 above, this would be a great place to help others if you know of references to good literature (if any) on the fauna of Kem Kem. Feel free to post the names of publications you've found or links to useful websites you've encountered. Cheers. -Ken
  8. 2 likes
    This is not a rant or venting; just a mild exclamation of surprise and bemusement. So...I listed a few fossil shark teeth on LetGo and lo and behold, the listing was pulled and I was directed to the site rules where sho 'nuff: no fossils! Fossils fall under LetGo's Prohibited agAinst selling Animal products which (besides fossils) includes live animals and fur, skin, etc. of endangered species. What's strange to me is that 'only' the fur, skins, etc. of endangered animals are prohibited. I say that's "strange" because it doesn't seem the site bans other animal products since -besides leather shoes and clothing- goat skins and cow hides are offered; so it doesn't seem to be a case of "The Vegan Mafia" fighting "the rampant exploitation of animals, living and dead, modern and ancient" blah, blah, blah... And Indian Arrowheads and other antiquities are allowed so it doesn't seem to be a case of one of the misguided souls who mew "Don't nobody be robbing us of our heritage!" So why the ban against fossils-? What did a fossil ever do to LetGo? LOL
  9. 2 likes
    Hello, a few months ago I recieved a fossil from the mines from Madagascar; a Barasaurus ( Perm ) It took a lot of trial and error to prep this fossil and I had to keep gluing parts that got lose. the matrix was very challenging, sometimes extrmely hard, and sometimes very soft end the bones were brittle. the fossil was a real challenge, but I got to the end.
  10. 2 likes
    That's oolitic chert. similar ones here
  11. 2 likes
    If these are oolites, I think they have been replaced by chert. This piece has a quartz look to it.
  12. 2 likes
    I went hunting today in the Bowling Green area. The Peace River is up over the last week, but only about 8 inches. A number of the locations I had been digging are still dig-able. I am not sure why the River has gone up a lot more below Paynes Creek Park than above Paynes Creek Park. Having said that, I found small teeth, a few turtle foot pads/spurs, a broken armadillo scute, a nice Equus tooth and my find of the day, a really small 3 mm nurse shark tooth. The rain held off until 1 pm, sometimes sunny, sometimes overcast. Then a thunder shower for an hour, and digging for 90 minutes. With the season drawing to a close, any day on the river is pure joy!
  13. 2 likes
    I would guess misguided concerns over laws they don't understand/want to deal with?
  14. 2 likes
    It's part of the outer whorl of an ammonite or part of a heteromorph ammonite if they have them like that in Montana.
  15. 2 likes
    This one also looks like Equisetum winchesteri figure from: Grande, L. 2013 The lost world of Fossil Lake: Snapshots from deep time. University of Chicago Press, 425 pp.
  16. 2 likes
    @Monica, I think #9 is likely a gastropod of some type, can't tell much from that photo, but my reservation against Tornoceras is that I have never seen one with that type of replacement in the trilobite beds. I believe they we're aragonite and were replaced with different materials during diagenesis. The Tornoceras that I've seen/found in that layer are very difficult to spot because they have very poorly-defined morphological features and match the surrounding matrix in color. However, I'm speaking from my own experience and am not able to rule it out entirely. A closer photo might help put it rest.
  17. 2 likes
    Feedbacks are worthless when the collectors receiving the material do not realize the ID's are incorrect and when they do there is no way to change it. Paleontologists know very little about the Kem Kem so sellers and collectors are even less informed. My suggestion is to post your interests here, before you buy and we can try to give you our assesment. Lots of very nice material is being made available and you do not want to turn away from it.
  18. 2 likes
    Too late ... its on the permit. I already blamed it on you. (just kidding ) I'm in the process of designing a different type of plow for my tractor, more of a deep running sub-soiler type that just heaves up the plates letting them fracture where they would naturally without disturbing them as much as the turning plow does. I may need to enlist the help of a neighbor with a larger tractor. I plan to take pics of the process as I go along. This new spot looks quite promising, its about 30yds from the berrypatch where I found most of the other stuff I've posted. That patch has been exposed for a year now and although there is still many fossils there, the shale has disintegrated and is super fragile now .... (unless I dig deeper) shhhhh, don't tell the wifey. Planning to be back soon, when it quits raining and dries up a bit. Will start a new topic then ... with pics. Kindest regards,
  19. 2 likes
  20. 2 likes
    Looking good and it does not detract from the tooth which IMO is very important. Glad you still value your ounces
  21. 2 likes
    Add injury to disease or genetics. Below is a modern great hammerhead (Sphyrna mokarran) lower jaw with pathological teeth caused by a sting ray barb injury to the jaw. The below picture shows a ray barb embedded in this jaw: The lower jaw teeth files just above the ray barb are crossed probably as a result of the jaw damage caused by the barb. The lower jaw also has an obvious pathology in the symphyseal teeth as a result of the sting ray barb. It looks like two rows of pathological alternate teeth (blue) with a single row of symphyseal teeth (red). Usually Sphyrna mokarran have only a medial tooth in the lower symphysis or sometimes two teeth. Three teeth like those shown below are really unusual. : Some modern pathological teeth including bull and hammerhead. I agree with what others have already said in this post that you need to know the age of the formation that this tooth is from for an accurate id. Marco Sr.
  22. 2 likes
    This was one of the posts that helped convince me to stay on TFF. I was so impressed by the teamwork, general open mindedness to even consider it wasn’t man made and all the knowledge of geological forms shared to hypothesize, enlighten and educate. I could see the love of fossils, rocks and geology working together in a community of like minded individuals to solve a very intriguing and awesome mystery of the coolest geologic form I had ever seen. I was pretty much hooked after that. That, all the cool fossils and trip reports. You core members of TFF that are on here on practically a daily basis are pretty awesome and cool. Thank you for making TFF the great place it is. I’m glad I stayed and I’ve been enriched, enlightened and educated by practically every one of you at one time or another over the past 8 months or so. Thanks Kim
  23. 2 likes
    You should check the Fossils of New Jersey website for advice about equipment for collecting from the Cretaceous streams of New Jersey. You will need a hand shovel and sift with quarter inch mesh is best. I've seen people using kitchen strainers. There are rules in Big Brook Park on the size of shovel and sift allowed. You might also consider Ramanessin Brook which is in Holmdel. You can access by a trail located on Middletown Road across from the elementary school. Familiarize yourself well with the fossils you might potentially find. Shark teeth, which are fairly common, are relatively easy to recognize, but there's a host of other fossils present which are easy to overlook. Last year I found a dinosaur tooth there and 99% of people probably would have tossed it not realizing what it was.
  24. 1 like
    No doubt it's a modern vert of a fish. The other things I'm not sure.... lets see some opinions.
  25. 1 like
    Glad you were able to make it out again this season. It would make sense that the river is still more workable the further you go back up to the source of the Peace. I'd have to believe that the further down towards its terminus at Port Charlotte the more acreage of drainage is contributing to the overall river level. Would love to see photos of the Nurse Shark tooth. I've only found a few from the Peace River and that has been while going through collected micro-matrix. Cheers. -Ken
  26. 1 like
    Thanks Gents! The Greenops does have its pygidium rolled up underneath it. If only I could get one with all its spines!
  27. 1 like
    If it is agate it could have traveled a long distance. If it oolitic limestone, not as far, but still quite a distance. A simple hardness test will tell which it is. Agate will not scratch with a knife, calcite will.
  28. 1 like
    I think it is a heteromorph ammonite. Nice find.
  29. 1 like
    Ya, we see how you tried to jump on the "great minds" bandwagon after the comment was already stated. Those half Whelsh Moroccan dwellers are real sneaky individuals.
  30. 1 like
    @GeschWhat The septa are hemispherical/semi-ovoid in shape as best I can tell from this particular section. They do fiz vigorously in vinegar! Not sure what yours is but it appears different than what I'm messing with..Yours looks oolite/ooid like, maybe even a very well rounded quartz grain? Does yours fiz? Maybe the others will offer something more definitive for you. Good luck with chasing that one down. Thanks for looking at this thread. Regards, Chris
  31. 1 like
    Yes it did turn out well. Please keep us posted. DW won't let me get artsy.
  32. 1 like
    I try to stay off the scale too. Is that bad?
  33. 1 like
    Here is some backround on the Kem Kem Beds @Masp
  34. 1 like
    Dromaeosaur is not known from the Kem Kem although we believe dromaeosaurids do exist. Not sure what that vertebra is does not fit dromaeosaurids that I'm familiar with. May be croc and leaning against dinosaurian. Your other vertebra appears to be from a crocodile.
  35. 1 like
    It looks like a goniatitic suture to me. If so that would have been a pretty big goniatite. Nice. Some ceratites have similar sutures as well, maybe a better match.
  36. 1 like
    I donated those whale barns years ago. I found them in either the Scotia Sandstone or Rio Dell Formations in northern California and yes, i did find some whale bone here and there too. RB
  37. 1 like
    Hello there! Yes, Viola and I were indeed at the dig yesterday, and we met Jay and Mike (you're very welcome for the rocks and the cookies - I hope you had a wonderful birthday!!!). Since I didn't want to aggravate my "fossil elbow" (at the end of last summer I tried hammering every rock that I saw at my local site, and some of it obviously isn't meant to be hammered because I came away with a sore elbow - I really need to get some physio for it - hopefully I'll get around to that this summer...) I let Viola use the tools for most of the time we were at Penn Dixie - she had a blast!!! We found lots of stuff - nothing terribly new/exciting for many, but still new/exciting for us! I'll post pictures as soon as I can take some (I'm waiting for bright sunshine to stream through our windows...) Monica
  38. 1 like
    That is what the emojis are for.
  39. 1 like
    They're often nicely preserved here in the middle Jurassic. Here's a single valve that I just finished prepping. The matrix was soft enough to be able to easily expose the hinge. I figure I might as well also show the last prepped find from this bank. It's a Grammatodon subdecussata together with a terebratulid brachiopod and another bivalve which I haven't been able to identify yet.
  40. 1 like
    If the matrix is soft, I would slowly pick it off with tools and leave on the matrix pedalstool for stability and display aesthetics. That way you can have much more control over what parts you want exposed.
  41. 1 like
  42. 1 like
  43. 1 like
    "Hate on"? Is that a Southernism? I like that one on matrix.. apparently you normally find them loose?
  44. 1 like
    Thanks to seemingly recent, and very large, cliff falls the pickings were abundant. In the past my finds were mostly partials and quite small, but on this day almost everything was intact and quite large! As the tide was going out, I found quite a few little crabs hiding in small pools of water in the London Clay. I got a couple of pictures, but we kept our distances from each other. I spent a total of 3 hours on the beach, as I was so engrossed with my finds. Now, I've never had luck with shark teeth at Walton. The best I came across was a small fragment of a sand tiger tooth on my first visit. So, I was determined to pick up something on this trip, especially since there weren't many people on the beach. About an hour and a half into my searching I was starting to become discouraged again. I'm walking along the London Clay, looking in little pools of rocks, shells, and pyrite wood. I'm berating myself in my head for not being good at finding shark teeth, and maybe that it just isn't in the cards for me again, when I look down and lo and behold...an intact tooth!!! I almost jumped out of my skin with excitement. I looked around to make sure no one was close enough to snatch it from me before I could get a picture. This is one of my most exciting finds of the day and I'm proud of myself for not quite giving up.
  45. 1 like
    The site on Hwy 27 used to be excellent, but several years ago GDOT widened the hwy and in the process graded the roadcut and covered it with fabric impregnated with seeds of some nasty very tough plant for erosion control. Now all that remains are some broken fragments of oysters such as Exogyra. Unfortunately that is a common pattern in Georgia. The state has also become very aggressive about making mines reclaim their sites as soon as mining operations cease. Many old kaolin mines used to be great for Eocene sharks, rays, even occasional whales but I don't know of any that are still accessible. Probably your best bet would be to join a local club or the Georgia Mineral Society, and participate in organized trips. Don
  46. 1 like
    Well near the end of that day, we hit another spot and Tyler started a hole and worked it for a couple hours with decent success. I looked at the weather prediction for the next 10 days and saw that rain is more than likely for 8 of the next 10 days, so even though I was pretty beat, I reloaded my stuff and went again on the 12th to dig in the hole that Tyler had started. I was really beat (I don't know how @Shellseeker does it. Anyway, 5 hours of digging turned out to be pretty productive. No new specimens to extend my collection, but a pretty decent take for what may be the last day of the Peace River season. Lets hope the weather channel has got it wrong (again). Here's the last day's take.
  47. 1 like
    Thanks again, Joe, I'll get onto it soon. I think the pentaradiates/hexaradiates are larger on the top surface. I'm very pleased to hear about chancelloriids. Another specimen, weathered section, showing larger pentaradiates (the large one at the top, left of centre, is about 3mm) on the concave (top) region. ( @Spongy Joe you've seen this one before, when you first mentioned heteractinid as a probability). Sp.11 Sp.11
  48. 1 like
    Are you attempting to remove the pyrite, or simply clean it? If cleaning, I use the following process (posted in many other places on the forum where cleaning pyrite is discussed. Mix 1 cup of Iron Out Rust Remover (available at most hardware stores) with 1 gallon of water. Soak your pyrite in this solution overnight Don't panic when you pull them out in the morning as they will be stained black Scrub with dish soap or concentrated Simple Green and a tooth brush Rinse with plenty of water Towel dry and allow to sit for at least 24 hours. Or dry for a few hours in your oven on the lowest setting with the door cracked open. Next, mix some PVA (B-15), Butvar, or Paraloid with acetone using this ratio by volume (1 part plastic:50 parts acetone Soak the pyrite in this solution or apply several coats by brush to seal out moisture This will preserve your pyrite for eternity.
  49. 1 like
    I believe the Elhraz Formation is a little older than the Kem Kem Beds. However dinosaur remains from Spinosaurus and Carchardontosaurus have been found there and in Egypt. But more herbivores are described from both Niger and Egypt. Could the preservation in the Kem Kem beds have to do with part of it?
  50. 1 like

    From the album Corals

    This one looks like a mushroom. Gosau Formation, Santonium. Found at Pass Gschuett in Salzburgerland.
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