Jump to content

Leaderboard

  1. Troodon

    Troodon

    Editing Members


    • Informative Content

      29

    • Content count

      9,303


  2. Kane

    Kane

    Moderator


    • Informative Content

      10

    • Content count

      5,302


  3. Paleoworld-101

    Paleoworld-101

    Regular Members


    • Informative Content

      9

    • Content count

      1,278


  4. Tidgy's Dad

    Tidgy's Dad

    Regular Members


    • Informative Content

      7

    • Content count

      7,345



Popular Content

Showing most informative content on 08/20/2018 in all areas

  1. 4 likes
    Its not T rex that species is not found in NM. Do you have a locality or formation where it was found. Its a Tyrannosaurid since there are campanian and early Maastrichtian deposits in NM. T rex is only found in deposits at the very end of the Maastrichtian age 66.8. -66mya
  2. 3 likes
    Thanks for the quick replies but I think i was able to answer my own question. I remembered an old post "A Whole Lot Of Platteville" by Caleb who unfortunately passed away several years ago. He had pictured an unusual gastropod that he had identified as Ophiletina sublaxa that seems to be a match.
  3. 3 likes
    Very real. One would see these at the Tucson fossil show. A higher end Kansas fossil dealer who specialized in the chalk deposits, and collected there would occasionally have one or parts of one. He also brought the big fishes from that locality, it's pretty cool material. Where I picked mine up. Most are sold in matrix better to mount and preserve the bones. Here is mine 7 ft wide and a complete arm
  4. 3 likes
    Hi there ... this is a fairly common find in the Chandler Bridge/ Ashley formations. This is a Billfish fossil vert process from the Oligocene Aglyptorhynchus sp. Sits just at the base of the tail. Image Credit: Facebook Rich Familia Image Credit: Facebook Alan Devier Image Credit: Facebook Alan Devier Some more info for you ....
  5. 3 likes
    Well depending on exactly where its probably the Fruitland or Kirkland Formation. Map of cretaceous exposures in NM So if its Kirkland.. cf Daspletosaurus, Bistahieversor so its best described as Tyrannosaurid indeterminate If Fruitland...Tyrannosaurid indet.
  6. 3 likes
    A few red flags I would like members to be aware of : This specimen is being listed as a rare Dinosaur bone an ulna. ----Nice piece but its a rib from the reptile Champsosaurus This specinen is being offered as a Carcharodontosaurus foot claw ----Suspect this is from a Spinosaurid since it appears to compare well a known morphology. Would like to see a ventral view to confirm These teeth are being listed as the spinosaurid Sigilmassasaurus from the Kem Kem ----We have no idea how to distinguish teeth from different Spinosaurid's in the Kem Kem. I purchased one tooth from earlier listings to examine it. No surprises met expectation did not see any difference from other teeth other than a slight curvature, no evidence of denticles. Your call. This claw is being listed as an Archarodontosaurus hand claw from Madagascar ----This sauropod is only known from a jaw section and teeth and no postcranial material unless there are unpublished finds. Its the only described Sauropod from that locality but being Jurassic its most likely other sauropods were present. Who knows but nice claw. Reminder to newer collectors, lots of fake dinosaur eggs out there. Post any interest before you buy. Here are a couple For laughs this Dinosaur bone claw tooth being listed. Oh its covered in marine life And finally if you missed this post
  7. 3 likes
    You guys are too quick to jump to conclusions. These are real. Life reconstruction:
  8. 3 likes
    Today I found a fossil fish. It granted me a fossil wish. I asked it for a hundred wishes. It granted me a hundred fishes.
  9. 2 likes
    What do you guys think of this. I’ve never seen one available before.
  10. 2 likes
    What's your view on the authenticity of this egg? It is 16cm in length, still largely embedded in matrix. This egg was said to be just dug up from Ganzhou, Jiangxi of China.
  11. 2 likes
    Giuseppe Marramà, Kerin M. Claeson, Giorgio Carnevale & Jürgen Kriwet(about 4 Mb) (2018) Revision of Eocene electric rays (Torpediniformes, Batomorphii) from the Bolca Konservat- Lagerstätte, Italy, reveals the first fossil embryo insitu in marine batoids and provides new insights into the origin of trophic novelties in coral reef fishes, Journal of Systematic Palaeontology, 16:14, 1189-1219, DOI: 10.1080/14772019.2017.1371257 sensitive people should beware of figs. 15 and 16 I resisted the temptation(lover of classic photography) to work Man Ray in there somewhere
  12. 2 likes
    So, this showed up on a site I visit from time to time. Quite the awesome fossil fish. It never ceases to amaze me what people believe to be fossils.
  13. 2 likes
    This egg is not wet as the sellers have a bad habit of doing, and I like it! Definitely it is an egg Elongatoolithus sp. of a real theropod dinosaur! The rock matrix is perfectly compatible with the coloring and granulation typical of the Ganzhou region, Jiangxi of China. I also liked the shells of other eggs scattered on the back of the matrix rock, besides, the egg seems to be very complete ... Congratulations, it will look beautiful after being prepared. 這樣的帖子,讓我想離開阿根廷永久居住在香港!
  14. 2 likes
    The challenge is; the piece has such an irregular surface, considerable sanding/material removal is required to get a smooth surface to polish. Sandpaper in increasingly fine grits is the way to accomplish this, followed by a polishing compound. One approach would be to "cut a window," shaping/polishing a single surface. This would enable a view of the interior and show off the lovely amber characteristic, but would not alter the entire appearance of the raw stone. Good luck, have fun.
  15. 2 likes
    They are, unless You live in China.
  16. 2 likes
    I would like to own and prep that egg.
  17. 2 likes
    Looks pretty close. @dlindner just an FYI vertebra from different parts of the spine can look very, very different. Cervical, thoracic, lumbar or caudal each look very different from one another even in the same individual or species.
  18. 2 likes
    Have a look at these : http://www.ambericawest.com/working/ https://www.amberpieces.com/how-to-process-and-polish-baltic-amber.html
  19. 2 likes
    Did some research and I stand corrected the McRae Fm, which I never heard of, #7 in the above chart is very late maastrichtian and Trex is reported from that locality. Not associated with this tooth. Very interesting always learning
  20. 2 likes
    This one is a tough call. The root closely matches the parasymphyseal teeth that I have in the Otodus lineage. However, the curve of the crown does not. The root does not match a most distal Otodus posterior tooth, but the crown curve does. So I think it is pathological. I'm 50/50 on it being either a pathological Otodus parasymphyseal (note parasymphyseal/symphyseal teeth can vary widely even in the same jaw so it is possibly not pathological) tooth or a pathological posterior Otodus tooth. I know this answer isn't very helpful but it is a tough call. If not expensive, I would buy it and I rarely buy teeth. Marco Sr.
  21. 2 likes
    I've stopped being amazed just shows you how uninformed people look at objects. It helps the view when there is some monetary incentive associated with it. The good news is that very few of these off the wall listings ever sell. Here is a dinosaur foot that went up today...seller however is clear and says he does not know what it is.... I
  22. 1 like
    From a bin at a flea market. Not sure how the tiger, giraffe, and the vehicle got in there, but ok.
  23. 1 like
    I have a hard enough time putting species names to complete bones . I would like to see the the reference sources that that claim came from, always like to learn new stuff.
  24. 1 like
    Some dinosaurs have specialized bones. You could tell if you had an osteoderm from the pits and veins. I believe spinosaur neural spines also possess the vein-y quality. Other than that I have no clue. Outside of dinosaurs, whales have a distinctive bone if you see the bone a lot and I’ve heard the same is true for mammoths. In acanthodians, they fin spines are very veiny, so if you didn’t have the outside “skin” you could still tell what you had. This seems like a good time to tag @Troodon
  25. 1 like
    Here are brachiopods I did for a nature center that way: I am willing to let anyone try. just pm me with a cost if interested in this idea. By the way, the clear resin is "artificial water" from a taxidermy supply company.
  26. 1 like
    That is neat idea. If I could add to that, I always wondered what would happen if you prep the ventral side and then add clear resin, and then prep dorsally, removing all matrix, and then add clear resin to that side as well. The result might be a free-floating trilobite display piece in a clear block.
  27. 1 like
    Looks like a nice one. Wish I had access to as many great eggs as you have.
  28. 1 like
    Where do you find all these great fossils in HK? The most I found was a mineral shop.
  29. 1 like
    Yes, those are pretty thin walls. Does he say where it’s from and what formation it was found in? If he says Houston, we have a problem. Meaning, if location doesn’t match fauna then I’d be dubious. I know nothing about buying fossils. I’ve never bought any. I’m just using deductive reasoning.
  30. 1 like
    I think that will turn out to be a coral of some kind.
  31. 1 like
    Hi Frank, I believe the fossils of Daspletosaurus cf. were once found here. However they are now placed into Bistahieversor. So the only DESCRIBED tyrannosaur is Bistahieversor Could always have the possibility of another to be found.
  32. 1 like
    Does he have a pic of the broken end? The thin bone wall would help ID it as an airborne animal rather than terrestrial.
  33. 1 like
    I feel your pain on that! I would be willing to donate my limbs and organs to have that hanging on the wall
  34. 1 like
    Thanks for the help, I think they look like at least half of a rudist steinkern. Help...how do I close my thread?
  35. 1 like
    This is a cow vertebra I found in a creek. You can see how the spinous process is broken off in a v shape. The two two little holes in your first pic may be diagnostic I don’t think most mamma have those. I’m curious, are most of the fossils there marine or terrestrial?
  36. 1 like
    Hi! Sorry, Summerville is in South Carolina in the US. The major formations there are the Chandler Bridge formation and the Ashley formation, dating back to the oligocene.
  37. 1 like
    No idea if this is a rexi or not. But i do believe they are found in New Mexico.
  38. 1 like
    The first two teeth are the same ones we talked about yesterday. I do not believe they are dinosaurian. The other tooth is not dinosaurian its the archosaur Revueltosaurus callenderi ,
  39. 1 like
    Could be with that curvature
  40. 1 like
    I passed the age of 5, I think that should suffice.
  41. 1 like
    With a bit of pin vice teatment, you'll be able to see it.
  42. 1 like
    My first FOTM. Date of discovery: August 9, 2018. Found and prepared this month by me. Scientific or Common name: Eldredgeops Rana Geologic Age or Geologic Formation: Middle Devonian State, Province, or Region found: Hampshire County, West Virginia Photos of find: attached, showing size, frontal, in situ, and before preparation.
  43. 1 like
    Very cool and outstanding photos, the lighting is perfect to make the images stunning. Yep its an ant
  44. 1 like
    Congratulations on your win with a most unusual find!
  45. 1 like
    Stunning pictures, the detail is incredible! Yes, the highlighted section would be the ocelli, they are generally hemispheres grouped together or slightly separated. Not sure about the first photo, doesn't seem in the right place to me and there's only the one. Not certain what this is, is it definitely attached to the head?
  46. 1 like
    Terrific piece. But I really love that Basilosaurus.
  47. 1 like
    Saltwick Bay - Yorkshire (23/12/17) Formation: Whitby Mudstone Deposit Age: 180 to 175 million years old (Early Jurassic) Fossil Diversity: Marine reptiles, ammonites, belemnites, fish, plants, bivalves, rare dinosaurs and pterosaurs Another new location for me, i visited this site on the way up into Scotland as i felt that going past the famous Yorkshire Jurassic coast and not stopping to collect would have been a recipe for deep regret later on. This stretch of coast is almost as famous as the one in Dorset, and is arguably just as productive. I only had three hours to visit this location and being a first timer i didn't expect to do very well. It ended up being a great day however and i managed a good sampling of the local fauna. Collecting here is tougher than the Dorset coast in many ways because the rocks usually still encase the fossils when you find them rather than picking things like ammonites up loose as you might do down in Dorset. Fossils here are mostly in nodules of solid rock with only their edges showing to tell you there is something inside. If you are skilled with a hammer you can crack these nodules and pray that the fossil inside doesn't smash into pieces, which many people are able to do, or you can instead take the more methodical approach and carefully prep these nodules with air scribes and chisels to produce the finest results. This of course requires the right tools and skill with prepping, which i personally do not have. So i stuck to picking things up as they were on the beach and kept them un-prepped as display specimens perhaps to be prepped at some point in the future. I can't speak for all of the Yorkshire Jurassic coast, but from what i experienced, ammonite nodules are surprisingly common at Saltwick Bay and in just a few hours you should be able to pick up a decent one or two. I was more interested in the bones of marine reptiles though, so i was very pleased when i came across a huge block full of various reptile bones. This piece weighed well over 5 kg and it was a real problem trying to get it home in my suitcase on the plane back to Australia but thankfully it survived the journey (and so did my suitcase!). I left this location quite impressed with the number of fossils found here and perhaps in future trips i will dedicate more time here instead of just going to the Dorset coast for my Jurassic marine reptile fix. View from the access point looking down into the bay from above. It's quite a stunning view! Apologies about the darkness of the image, i took this at sunset as i was leaving. The large block of marine reptile bones that i found on the shore (south side of the bay). It appears to contain a variety of bones that are most likely associated, including a probable vertebra in cross section (the rectangular bone). I am very keen to find out what this is, but probably won't know until it is prepped. The likely candidates include ichthyosaur, plesiosaur or marine crocodile. A beautiful ammonite. I believe this is Dactylioceras commune. I found this ammonite amongst the boulders as-is, which makes me suspect that someone planted it there. The other side is encased in rock, but to have this side beautifully exposed like this, could it really be natural?! I'd like to hear from other Yorkshire collectors if this happens or not. Maybe someone decided to leave an anonymous Christmas present??? Other ammonite nodules with the edges showing, much more natural looking! Sections of ammonite coil. These are quite abundant amongst the boulders and pebbles on the beach. Belemnite guards. The last one has a weird wavy wear pattern to it, am i going crazy or does it look like insect damage on trees? Are any ancient invertebrates known to do this to belemnite guards? Belemnite phragmocones. I don't find these at my other usual Mesozoic locations that have belemnites so i was glad to pick these up.
  48. 1 like
    Aust Cliff - Gloucestershire (19/12/17) Formation: Westbury (the 'Rhaetic Bone Bed') Deposit Age: 205 million years old (Late Triassic) Fossil Diversity: Bony fish, sharks, marine reptiles, rare dinosaurs This was a new location for me, and i was pleasantly surprised! The unit of interest here is a bone bed layer within the Westbury Formation that is full of fish and reptile remains from the Late Triassic. I had read how productive this bonebed was, but until i was actually there picking up chunks of the stuff i didn't believe it would be quite so full of teeth and bones! Unfortunately this bone bed does not outcrop at beach level, only in the upper part of the cliff above you, so you need to rely on rock falls to collect at this location. However if you can find any of the bone bed on the shore below i guarantee you will find things. Competition for blocks of this rock on the beach is apparently high among collectors, though i had no trouble finding a good number of chunks of it when i visited myself. I could however tell that some of them had already been broken up by others. Even so, a good number of specimens were left behind and for a first timer i was quite happy with the nice haul of fish teeth and various reptile bones that i ended up with after just a few hours. The location as seen from the path access just off of New Passage Road. The bone bed of interest is in the whitish layers at the top of the cliff. The red beds below are unfossiliferous. You can also collect on the north side of the bridge around the corner in the distance of this photo, but i only stayed on the south side. Just to demonstrate how productive this bone bed can be, the following five pictures all show specimens on this one single block of rock below. A reptilian limb section. Another bit of probable limb (or rib?) Perhaps a bit of shark spine? Another bone exposed on the side of the block in cross section. A small fish tooth. Severnichthys acuminatus. A small shark tooth. This little guy and the others like it are now the oldest shark teeth in my collection. Large fragment of marine reptile bone. A small fish scale. Part of a large ichthyosaur vertebra. This was found as is. Someone else seemed to have unsuccessfully broken it out of a block and then left it. I'm not complaining Fish bone i suspect. Another little shark tooth (Hybodus). Some of these you almost need a magnifying glass to see! I'm sure i could go through the rocks i picked up and look at them closely to find all sorts of other stuff as well.
  49. 1 like
    Beach rolled marine reptile bones. Ichthyosaur vertebrae. As previously stated, bones like this are perhaps the most common along this stretch of beach. Most likely from Ichthyosaurus itself. An ichthyosaur paddle digit. Another first crossed off! I had always wondered why no paddle bones had turned up for me yet vertebrae were always so common, but finally i can say that i have found one from this location! Close ups of the ichthyosaur rostrum. Quite nasty looking teeth! I was really glad to find this. Probably Ichthyosaurus. Plesiosaur vertebra. Probably from Plesiosaurus. It is quite worn, but on the plus side the bony texture is quite nice i think! The final photo shows the paired foramen openings on the underside of the bone, a classic plesiosaur feature.
  50. 1 like
    The largest bit of rolled dinosaur bone i picked up, from just south of Hanover Point. A suspected fragment of large dinosaur rib from the beach directly opposite Chilton Chine. More beach rolled dinosaur bones. These are only the larger ones that i have pictured, but in total i collected almost 30 across three days.
×