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Showing most informative content since 12/10/2017 in all areas

  1. 12 likes
    Posted are a few concerns I found wandering through the internet. These are but a few examples of the type of issues you may encounter. I send this out as a reminder if you're shopping for fossil presents of any kind. Sellers mis-identify material simply through lack of knowledge but it's up to the buyer to know what they are looking at. Don't hesitate to post interests BEFORE you buy. BUYER BEWARE when it comes to fossils of any kind. Seller wants huge money for this Saurolophus osborni lower arm from the Two Medicine Formation. Looks like a nice arm but some of his facts are incorrect. This species is not found in the Campanian of the Two Medicine Formation but the early Maastrichtian age of the Horseshoe Canyon Formation. Another key point is that it's very difficult to determine taxons from post cranial bones of Hadrosaurs especially in an fauna where multiple species exist. Nice lower arm from somewhere and from some unknown Hadrosaur. What's this seller thinking the "2 Medicine Man Formation" really attention to detail not one of his strong points. Someone tell him its the Two Medicine Formation. Maybe he watches lots of Westerns Seller describes this as Pachycephalosaurus in my opinion it's Thescelosaurus Seller is properly describing this beautiful jaw as Ornithischian but in detail description adds that it was discovered where many Pachycephalosaurus fossils were found giving one the impression it's Pachy. In my opinion it's Thescelosaurus. Teeth of these two species look similar inquire before you buy. I see a lot of these being offered or sale, nice Christmas gift. For those of you that are new to collecting the only thing real here are the crowns. Nice gift Seller is offering this Claw and Identifying it as Velociraptor from the Hell Creek Formation. It's a very worn Anzu wyliei hand claw.
  2. 10 likes
    This appears to be a juvenile domestic pig maxilla, with the first adult tooth (m1) already erupted.
  3. 9 likes
    Came across this site hosted by Christophe Hendrickx a well known theropod Paleontologist. A lot of what he has is already provided in papers but this is the first site completely dedicated to the worldwide group of dinosaurs know as Spinosauridae Pretty cool. This site like many others has a bias toward what paleontologist believes and who he is associated with... so no mention Sigilmassasaurus. I found it interesting but its not gospel just another source of information and opinion. Remember theropods from the Kem Kem especially Spinosaurids are poorly understood and lots of different opinions are out there. It provides multiple language translations from French so its perfect to our worldwide members. http://spinosauridae.fr.gd/Accueil.htm Lots of cool illustrations all together. Spinosaurus vertebra Suchomimus arm
  4. 9 likes
    Thaleops ovata Thaleops cranidium ceraurid sp. Isotelus sp. Basiliella barrandei Anataphrus vigilans ceraurid sp. Isotelus sp. Ectenaspis homalonotoides / Failleana indeterminatus Ectenaspis beckeri Ectenaspis beckeri
  5. 7 likes
    Zuul crurivastator is a genus of herbivorous ankylosaurine dinosaur from the Campanian, Judith River Formation of Montana that was described earlier this year. The name Zuul was inspired by the monster Zuul in the movie Gostbusters. Some images from the ROM that is ongoing in the preparation of this monster. Took 8 weeks to dig up and will take 4 years to prepare. 3D Skull DL4BnoMW0AEDqLj.mp4
  6. 7 likes
    Put a stocking over the end of the hose of the vacuum cleaner and then go round where you dropped it. It is easier than searching through a bag you just have a small area to search. Wives don't mind sacrificing small things for collections, ask any of my exes
  7. 7 likes
    Paleontologists have found ticks grasping a dinosaur feather entombed in cretaceous amber. Those buggers will outlive us. Although not yet published they probably contributed to their extinction https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-017-01550-z
  8. 6 likes
    Well, This is a story that tangentially relates to fossil excursions. I'm not one to want to collect jars of shards or Leaverites but I do like to pocket teeth that I think would be good for trades , gifts etc. My son is approaching the age now where he shows a bit more interest and he has started many 'collections' , shark teeth being one of many. (he collects rocks, sticks, bugs, buttons, shiny crystals - more rocks-, you get the idea) I visited his school this morning for my first (hopefully one of many) presentations. I had a few visual aids up on the projector screen but mainly talked about the Oligocene of South Carolina and sharks. Well, ok Megalodon sharks and the things that they ate, and the landscape at the time. 20 minutes was about all that these figit-y pre-k and kindergarten kids would give me but it was worth it. I may have converted a few in the process. Of course images of fossilized poo won the day and got the biggest reaction. Go figure ... though, I did stick those images in for that very reason. I'd like to give a shout out to Bobby @Boesse and the Mace Brown Museum of Natural History in Charleston for the inspiration. The exhibits there are outstanding and really give you a nice slice of the fauna in the area at the time. I relied on shots from inside of the museum for visual aids when discussing Basilosaurids and the evolution of whales (the kids honestly were more impressed with the whale's teeth). And if it wasn't for Cade and his most excellent hand-drawn identification page @Sharks of SC I don't think the visuals would have been half as impressive. The kids loved the handouts Cade and the cool thing is they double as something that they can color ! The prep Goodie bags for 22 students. They each got 5 teeth from 4 different sharks. Angy partials Oh, and if you are curious the meg at the far end of the table is a beautiful 7" inch reproduction of a Meg tooth by Matty Swilp. One the kids could handle and toss around without me having a heart attack. It looks amazing. The 7 inch repro ... Cheers, Brett
  9. 6 likes
    Here is a great TFF exclusive, a list of all the trilobite papers published in 2017. In 2017 a total of 169 trilobite papers were published, down slightly from 173 in 2016: LINK Unfortunately, only 51 could be posted as open access papers at Trilobite Papers 2006-2017. Please contact me via PM if any additional papers are needed from this list. Looking forward to another great year of trilobites in 2018! Tortello, M.F. (2017) Trilobites from the Lejopyge laevigata Zone (Guzhangian; Upper Middle Cambrian) of the San Isidro Area, Mendoza, Argentina. Ameghiniana, 54(4):465-474 Sun, X.W., Bentley, C.J., & Jago, J.B. (2017) The significance of Cambro-Ordovician trilobites from the Kalladeina 1 drill hole, Warburton Basin, South Australia. Australian Journal of Earth Sciences, 64(4):471-485 John, D.L., Medeiros, P.M., Babcock-Adams, L., & Walker, S.E. (2017) Cambrian Trilobites as Archives for Anthropocene Biomarkers and Other Chemical Compounds. Anthropocene, 17:99-106 Benedetto, J.L., Lavie, F.J., & Muñoz, D.F. (2017) Broeggeria Walcott and other upper Cambrian and Tremadocian linguloid brachiopods from NW Argentina. Geological Journal, (ahead-of-print publication) Westrop, S.R., & Landing, E. (2017) The agnostoid arthropod Lotagnostus Whitehouse, 1936 (late Cambrian; Furongian) from Avalonian Cape Breton Island (Nova Scotia, Canada) and its significance for international correlation. Geological Magazine 154(5):1001-1021 Zeng, H., Zhao, F., Yin, Z., & Zhu, M. (2017) Appendages of an early Cambrian metadoxidid trilobite from Yunnan, SW China support mandibulate affinities of trilobites and artiopods. Geological Magazine, 154(6):1306-1328 Álvaro, J.J., Esteve, J., & Zamora, S. (2017) Morphological assessment of the earliest paradoxidid trilobites (Cambrian Series 3) from Morocco and Spain. Geological Magazine, (ahead-of-print publication) Crônier, C., Abbache, A., Khaldi, A.Y., Oudot, M., Maillet, S., & Mehadji, A. (2017) Middle Devonian trilobites of the Saoura Valley, Algeria: insights into their biodiversity and Moroccan affinities. Geological Magazine, (ahead-of-print publication) Heward, A.P., Booth, G.A., Fortey, R.A., Miller, C.G., & Sansom, I.J. (2017) Darriwilian shallow-marine deposits from the Sultanate of Oman, a poorly known portion of the Arabian margin of Gondwana. Geological Magazine, (ahead-of-print publication) Park, T.Y. (2017) Ontogeny of the two co-occurring middle Furongian (late Cambrian) shumardiid trilobites and the protaspid morphology of shumardiids. Geological Magazine, (ahead-of-print publication) Monti, D.S. (2017) Morphometrics of Leptoplastides marianus (Hoek) (Trilobita, Olenidae) from the Tremadocian of north-western Argentina: taxonomic implications. Journal of Systematic Palaeontology, (ahead-of-print publication) Ebbestad, J.O.R., & Weidner, T. (2017) Extreme protomeric development in a burlingiid trilobite from Cambrian glacial erratics of Denmark. Palaeontology, 60(2):233-253 Hopkins, M.J. (2017) How well does a part represent the whole? A comparison of cranidial shape evolution with exoskeletal character evolution in the trilobite family Pterocephaliidae. Palaeontology, 60(3):309-318 Esteve, J., Rubio, P., Zamora, S., & Rahman, I.A. (2017) Modelling enrolment in Cambrian trilobites. Palaeontology, 60(3):423-432 Trenchard, H., Brett, C.E., & Perc, M. (2017) Trilobite ‘pelotons’: possible hydrodynamic drag effects between leading and following trilobites in trilobite queues. Palaeontology, 60(4):557-569 Laibl, L (2017) Patterns in Palaeontology: The development of trilobites. Palaeontology Online, 7(10):1-9 Fletcher, T.P. (2017) Agraulos ceticephalus and other Cambrian trilobites in the subfamily Agraulinae from Bohemia, Newfoundland and Wales. Papers in Palaeontology, 3(2):175-217 Schoenemann, B., & Clarkson, E.N.K. (2017) Vision in fossilised eyes. Earth and Environmental Science Transactions of The Royal Society of Edinburgh, 106(4):209-220 McCobb, L.M.E., & Popov, L.E. (2017) Late Ordovician trilobites from the Mayatas Formation, Atansor area, north-central Kazakhstan. Earth and Environmental Science Transactions of The Royal Society of Edinburgh, 107(1):33-52 Becker, M.A., Chamberlain, R.B., Maisch, H.M., Bartholomew, A., & Chamberlain, J.A. (2017) Trilobites from the Rickard Hill facies of the Saugerties Member of the Schoharie Formation, eastern New York (upper Emsian and Lower Devonian): a case study in taphonomy and sequence stratigraphy from glacial erratics. Atlantic Geology, 53:269-284 Westrop, S.R., & Dengler, A.A. (2017) The mid-Cambrian (Series 3, Drumian–Guzhangian; Marjuman) trilobite Holmdalia Robison, 1988, in western Newfoundland and its biostratigraphic significance. Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, 54(2):113-128 Knight, I., Boyce, W.D., Skovsted, C.B., & Balthasar, U. (2017) The Lower Cambrian Forteau Formation, southern Labrador and Great Northern Peninsula, western Newfoundland: Lithostratigraphy, trilobites, and depositional setting. Government of Newfoundland and Labrador, Department of Natural Resources, Geological Survey, St. John’s, Occasional Papers, 2017(1):1-72 Lin, T. (2017) Notes on the genus Asteromajia Nan and Chang, 1982 (Trilobita, Cambrian). Acta Palaeontologica Sinica, 56(1):1-9 Gao J., & Yuan J. (2017) Revision of the type species of the genus Kunmingaspis Chang, 1964 (Trilobita). Acta Palaeontologica Sinica, 56(1):10-19 Pang C.J., Han, N., Chen G.Y., & Wen, S. (2017) Techniques of exuviation in Liaodong species of early Cambrian trilobite Redlichia (Pteroredlichia) murakamii Resser et Endo. Acta Palaeontologica Sinica, 56(1):20-24 Liang B.Y., Peng, J., Wen, R.Q., & Liu, S. (2017) Ontogeny of the trilobite Redlichia (Pteroredlichia) chinensis (Walcott, 1905) from the Cambrian Balang Formation. Acta Palaeontologica Sinica, 56(1):25-36 Ren, G.Y., Wei, C.T., & Yuan, J.L. (2017) Revision of Shantungia (Trilobita: Damesellidae) from the Kushan Formation (Guzhangian), Shandong, China. Palaeoworld, 26(3):423-430 Wei, X., & Zhan, R.B. (2017) A late Rhuddanian (early Llandovery, Silurian) trilobite association from South China and its implications. Palaeoworld, (ahead-of-print publication) Pärnaste, H. (ed.) 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives. Tallinn, Estonia, 7-10 July 2017. Abstracts. Libris Est OÜ, Tallinn, 40 pp. Adrain, J.M. (2017) "Cryptogenesis" a half century on–progress(?) and problems in higher trilobite phylogeny. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Ahlberg, P., Lundberg, F., Erlström, M., Calner, M., Lindskog, A., Dahlqvist, P., Lehnert, O., & Joachimski, M.M. (2017) Integrated Cambrian trilobite biostratigraphy and δ13Corg chemostratigraphy of the Grönhögen-2015 drill core, Öland, Sweden. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Munkhjargal, A. (2017) Trilobites from the Durvun Dert section, southern Mongolia. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Bernárdez, E., Rábano, I., Esteve, J. Laibl, L., & Gutiérrez-Marco, J.C. (2017) Trilobite ?eggs and babies from the “Túnel Ordovícico del Fabar” (Cantabrian Zone, northwestern Spain). Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Birch, R., McCobb, L.M.E., & Rushton, A.W.A. (2017) Little Green Seam of Unloved Slate. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Briggs, D.E.G. (2017) Thresholds in trilobite taphonomy. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Brodskii, A.V. (2017) A new glaphurid trilobite genus and species from the Darriwilian of the Saint Petersburg area. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Budil, P., Frýda, J., Chatterton, B.D.E., Corbacho, J., & Vokác, V. (2017) Intraspecific variability in the lichid trilobites Acanthopyge (A.) haueri and Acanthopyge (A.?) pervasta from the Devonian of the Barrandian area (Czech Republic). Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Coronado, I., & Esteve, J. (2017) Microstructural and crystallographic characterization of Cambrian trilobites (Shandong Province, North China): perspectives on trilobite biomineralization. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Crônier, C., Budil, P. Fatka, O., & Laibl, L. (2017) Bimodal variability and quantification in two Devonian trilobites. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Drage, H.B., Laibl, L., & Budil, P. (2017) Post-embryonic development of Dalmanitina proaeva, and the evolution of facial suture fusion in Phacopina. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Ebbestad, J.O.R., Høyberget, M., Högström, A.E., Jensen, S., Taylor, W., & Palacios, T. (2017) Holmiid trilobites from the lower Cambrian of the Digermulen Peninsula, Arctic Norway. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Esteve, J., Marcé-Nogué, J., Pérez-Peris, F., Rayfield, E. (2017) Origin of the dorsal facial sutures in trilobites. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Fatka, O., Kozák, V., Budil, P., Laibl, L. (2017) Hypostomes and ventral plates in Cambrian agnostids from the Barrandian area (Czech Republic). Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Fortey, R.A., & Ebbestad, J.O.R. (2017) Ordovician trilobites from Taimyr and the identity of Taimyraspis Balashova, 1959. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Geyer, G. (2017) The world’s oldest trilobites? A new look to the earliest known trilobites from the Anti-Atlas of Morocco. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Ghobadi Pour, M., Popov, L.E., Owens, R. Klishevich, I.A., & Vinogradova, E.A. (2017) First Early Devonian (Lochkovian) trilobites from the Shakshagaily Formation of the West Balkhash Region, Kazakhstan. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Gutiérrez-Marco, J.C., Rábano, I., & García-Bellido, D.C. (2017) The nileid trilobite Symphysurus from upper Tremadocian strata of the Moroccan Anti-Atlas: taxonomic reappraisal and palaeoenvironmental implications. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Gutiérrez-Marco J.C., Rábano, I., García-Bellido, D.C., & Sá, A.A. (2017) Selenopeltis longispina (Trilobita, Odontopleurida) from the Ordovician of Morocco: a reappraisal based on new skeletal and soft-bodied features. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Holloway, D.J. (2017) Trilobites of the orders Corynexochida, Lichida and Odontopleurida from the Silurian of northern Arkansas. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Hong, P.S. (2017) Cambrian Stage 5 trilobites from the lower Machari Formation, Taebaeksan Basin, Korea. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Hopkins, M.J. (2017) How well does cranidial shape evolution represent the evolution of the entire exoskeleton? Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Hou J., Hughes, N.C., Y.J., Zhang X., & Lan, T. (2017) Development and growth of the metadoxidid trilobite Hongshiyanaspis yiliangensis from the lower Cambrian (Series 2, Stage3) of southern China. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Hughes, H.E., & Thomas, A.T. (2017) Taphonomy and predation of Dalmanites in the Wenlock of Shropshire. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Hughes, N.C. (2017) Enrolment as an adaptive lens for viewing the evolution of trilobite trunk body patterning. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Kisailus, D., Herrera, S., Sarkar, S., Pärnaste, H., & Hughes, N.C. (2017) New materials inspired from fossils. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Laibl, L., Cederström, P., & Ahlberg, P. (2017) Early post-embryonic development in Ellipsostrenua and the developmental patterns in Ellipsocephaloidea. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Laibl, L., Esteve, J., & Fatka, O. (2017) Morphology, development and geographical variability of Sao hirsuta. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Lee, S.B. (2017) Polymerid trilobite assemblages in the Eosaukia Zone (Cambrian Stage 10, Furongian) of Korea and their biostratigraphic significance. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Lieberman, B.S. (2017) Trilobites, Contingency, and Predictability in the History of Life: the Relevance of Volatility to Macroevolution. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Losso, S.R., & Adrain, J.M. (2017) A new genus of trilobites from the Early Ordovician of the Great Basin (Utah and Idaho), and the phylogenetic structure of Dimeropygidae. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Machida, N., Agematsu, S., Sashida, K., & Sarsud, A. (2017) Preliminary report on the Early Devonian faunal and environmental transition of the phacopid trilobite Plagiolaria poothaii from southern Thailand. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia McCobb, L.M.E., McDermott, P.D., & Owen, A.W. (2017) The trilobites of the latest Katian Slade and Redhill Mudstone Formation, South West Wales. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia McDermott, P.D., McCobb, L.M.E., & Owen, A.W. (2017) The trilobite fauna of an uppermost Katian echinoderm lagerstätte. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Nowicki, J., & Zylinska, A. (2017) Gondwanan affinities of the earliest Paradoxididae in Baltica – new data from the Cambrian of the Holy Cross Mountains, Poland. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Pärnaste, H., Hughes, N.C., Kisailus, D., Sarkar, S., Herrera, S., Ahlberg, P., & Ebbestad, J.O.R. (2017) Lükati - a new Lower Cambrian Lagerstätte. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Pates, S., Bicknell, R.D.C., Daley, A.C., & Zamora, S. (2017) A quantitative analysis of repaired and unrepaired damage on Cambrian (Stage 4 and Drumian) trilobites from three sites in the Iberian Chains, Spain. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Peng S., Babcock, L.E., & Zhu X. (2017) Revised concept for Cambrian oryctocephalid trilobite genera Arthricocephalus Bergeron and Oryctocarella Tomashpolskaya and Karpinski. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Peng S., & & Zhu X. (2017) A new oryctocephalid trilobite genus from the Balang Formation (Cambrian Stage 4), northwestern Hunan, South China. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Pereira, S., Holloway, D.J., Adrain, J.M., da Silva, C.M., & Sá, A.A. (2017) Panderiidae and Hemibarrandiidae (Trilobita): their affinities with Nileidae. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Pérez-Peris, F., & Esteve, J. (2017) Morphological assessment of the agnostids Peronopsis ferox and Peronopsis acadica from North Spain. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Pratt, B.R., & Kimmig, J. (2017) Middle Cambrian coprolites from northwestern Canada, and their implications for the food chain and ecology of trilobites and hyoliths in deeper water. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Schoenemann, B., Pärnaste, H., & Clarkson, E.N.K. (2017) A Modern Visual System in the Compound Eye from the Base of the Lower Cambrian. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Sinclair, C.R., Gibb, S., & Sperling, F. (2017) Sexual dimorphism in Moroccan trilobites: evidence from morphological clustering and phylogenetic bracketing. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Stocker, C., Lane, P., Siveter, D., Wallis, S., Oji, T., Vandenbroucke, T., Siveter, D., Tanaka, G., Komatsu, T., Zalasiewicz, J., & Williams, M. (2017) The Silurian and Devonian proetid trilobites of Japan: a biogeographically or ecologically isolated fauna? Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Wernette, S.J., Hughes, N.C., Myrow, P.M., Aung, A.K., Sardsud, A. (2017) New upper Cambrian trilobites from Thailand and Myanmar and their stratigraphic significance. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Zhang Z., Zhang Z., Ghobadi Pour, M., Holmer, L.E., & Popov, L.E. (2017) The earliest known trilobite occurrence on the north-central Yangtze platform and its biostratigraphic significance. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Zhu X. (2017) New harpetid material from the Guole Biota. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Zwanzig, M. (2017) Exceptional preservation of the outermost cuticular layer in calymenid sclerites found inside orthocone nautiloids from the Silurian of Gotland (Sweden). Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Zylinska, A., & Nowicki, J. (2017) Retrodeforming Cambrian trilobites using morphometric techniques – two case studies from the Holy Cross Mountains, Poland. Abstracts: 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives, Tallinn, Estonia Pärnaste, H. (ed.) 6th International Conference on Trilobites and their Relatives. Excursion Guidebook Tallinn, Estonia, 7-10 July 2017. Abstracts. Libris Est OÜ, Tallinn, 52 pp. Dai T., Zhang X., & Peng S. (2017) Post-embryonic development and Intraspecific variation in trunk segmentation of the oryctocephalid trilobite Oryctocarella duyunensis from the Cambrian of South China. In: Liu, A., McIlroy, D., Narbonne, G., & Laflamme, M. (eds.) International Symposium on the Ediacaran-Cambrian Transition Geyer, G. (2017) Final fanfare: an ultimate glance to the Lower–Middle Cambrian boundary dilemma. In: Liu, A., McIlroy, D., Narbonne, G., & Laflamme, M. (eds.) International Symposium on the Ediacaran-Cambrian Transition Hildenbrand, A., Austermann, G., & Bengtson, P. (2017) Taxonomy of Drumian (middle Cambrian) agnostid trilobites of the Manuels River Formation from Conception Bay South, Newfoundland, Canada: implications for biostratigraphy, palaeobiogeography and palaeogeography. In: Liu, A., McIlroy, D., Narbonne, G., & Laflamme, M. (eds.) International Symposium on the Ediacaran-Cambrian Transition Jackson, I.S.C., Bohlin, M., Mann, R.P., & Budd, G.E. (2017) Genetic assimilation in the fossil record: the interplay of environment and selection in the Series Three trilobite-like arthropod Agnostus pisiformis from Avalonia and Baltica. In: Liu, A., McIlroy, D., Narbonne, G., & Laflamme, M. (eds.) International Symposium on the Ediacaran-Cambrian Transition Landing, E., Schmitz, M., Geyer, G., & Bowring, S.E. (2017) Precise U-Pb volcanic zircon dates show diachroneity of oldest Cambrian trilobites: Examples from the West Gondwana (southern Morocco) and Avalonia paleocontinents. In: Liu, A., McIlroy, D., Narbonne, G., & Laflamme, M. (eds.) International Symposium on the Ediacaran-Cambrian Transition Park, T.Y.S., Kihm, J.H., Woo, J., Kim, Y.H.G., & Lee, J.I. (2017) Ontogeny of the Furongian (late Cambrian) trilobite Proceratopyge cf. P. lata Whitehouse, 1939 from northern Victoria Land, Antarctica, and the evolution of metamorphosis in trilobites. In: Liu, A., McIlroy, D., Narbonne, G., & Laflamme, M. (eds.) International Symposium on the Ediacaran-Cambrian Transition Zeng H., Zhao F., Yin Z., & Zhu, M. (2017) Appendages of an early Cambrian trilobite support mandibulate affinities of trilobites and artiopods. In: Liu, A., McIlroy, D., Narbonne, G., & Laflamme, M. (eds.) International Symposium on the Ediacaran-Cambrian Transition Zhu X., & & Peng S. (2017) Chencunia (Trilobita, Cambrian), a junior synonym of Paraacidaspis. In: Liu, A., McIlroy, D., Narbonne, G., & Laflamme, M. (eds.) International Symposium on the Ediacaran-Cambrian Transition Van Viersen, A., Holland, D., & Koppka, J. (2017) The phacopine trilobite genera Morocops Basse, 2006 and Adrisiops gen. nov. from the Devonian of Morocco. Czech Geological Survey, Bulletin of Geosciences, 92(1):13-30 Fortey, R.A., & Edgecombe, G.D. (2017) An Upper Ordovician (Katian) trilobite fauna from the Lower Ktaoua Formation, Morocco. Czech Geological Survey, Bulletin of Geosciences, 92(3):311-322 Vyhnánková, I. (2017) Morphology of genal caeca in selected trilobites from the Barrandian area. Diploma Thesis, Charles University, 76 pp. Laibl, L., & Fatka, O. (2017) Review of early developmental stages of trilobites and agnostids from the Barrandian area (Czech Republic). Journal of the National Museum Prague, Natural History Series, 186:103-112 Fatka, O., & Budil, P. (2017) Digestive structures in the Middle Ordovician trilobite Prionocheilus Rouault, 1847 from the Barrandian area of Czech Republic. Geologica Acta, (ahead-of-print publication) Hughes, N.C., Hong, P., Hou, J. B., & Fusco, G. (2017) The development of the Silurian trilobite Aulacopleura koninckii reconstructed by applying inferred growth and segmentation dynamics: a case study in paleo-evo-devo. Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, 5(37):1-12 Zhang, X., Ahlberg, P., Babcock, L.E., Choi, D.K., Geyer, G., Gozalo, R., Hollingsworth, J.S., Li, G., Naimark, E.B., Pegel, T., Steiner, M., Wotte, T., & Zhang, Z. (2017) Challenges in defining the base of Cambrian Series 2 and Stage 3. Earth-Science Reviews, 172:124-139 Eriksson, M.E., & Horn, E. (2017) Agnostus pisiformis - a half a billion-year old pea-shaped enigma. Earth-Science Reviews, 173:65-76 Vinna, O., Toomb, U., & Isakarc, M. (2017) The earliest cornulitid on the internal surface of the illaenid pygidium from the Middle Ordovician of Estonia. Estonian Journal of Earth Sciences, 66(4):193-197 Singh, B.P., Bhargava, O.N., Negi, R.S., Zhao, Y., Yin, L., & Sharma, C.A. (2017) Additional trilobite fauna from the basal part of the Cambrian Series 3, Stage 5, Kunzam La (= Parahio) Formation, Parahio Valley, Spiti (Northwest Himalaya), India and its biostratigraphic significance. Annales de Paléontologie, 103:271-281 Farrar, L.E. & Fall, L.M. (2017) How does body size and abundance of trilobites change along a water depth gradient in the Trenton Group (Middle Ordovician) of central New York? GSA 290408 (Joint 52nd Northeastern Annual Section / 51st North-Central Annual Section Meeting) Paper No. 46-11 Censullo, S.M., & McRoberts, C. (2017) Triarthrus from the Upper Ordovician of New York revisited: taphonomic, taxonomic and morphometric analysis of Triarthrus beckii green and Triarthrus eatoni (Hall). GSA 290503 (Joint 52nd Northeastern Annual Section / 51st North-Central Annual Section Meeting) Paper No. 46-4 Repetski, J.E., Taylor, J.F., Kulenguski, J.T., & Strauss, J.V. (2017) New conodont and trilobite occurrences from the Cambrian of eastern Alaska. GSA 291377 (Joint 52nd Northeastern Annual Section / 51st North-Central Annual Section Meeting) Rippenhagen, A.H., & Fornwald, C. (2017) Hitting the slopes: the key to trilobite taphonomy. GSA 293238 (Rocky Mountain Section - 69th Annual Meeting) Paper No. 6-3 Hildenbrand, A., Austermann, G., & Bengtson, P. (2017) Agnostid trilobites and small shelly fossils (SSFS) from the Drumian (Middle Cambrian) Manuels River Formation, Conception Bay South, Newfoundland, Canada - implications for biostratigraphy, paleobiogeography and paleogeography. GSA 300045 (GSA Annual Meeting in Seattle, Washington) Paper No. 83-3 Hopkins, M.J., & Lamsdell, J.C. (2017) No change in morphological disparity in lichid trilobites across the end-Ordovician extinction. GSA 305827 (GSA Annual Meeting in Seattle, Washington) Paper No. 1-1 Losso, S.R., & Adrain, J.M. (2017) New genera of dimeropygid trilobites from the early Ordovician of the western United States and the phylogenetic structure of the family. GSA 306977 (GSA Annual Meeting in Seattle, Washington) Paper No. 84-15 Schwimmer, D.R. (2017) A Cambrian meraspid cluster: evidence of trilobite egg deposition. GSA 295123 (GSA Annual Meeting in Seattle, Washington) Paper No. 1-6 Lamsdell, J.C. (2017) Phylogeny and evolutionary history of lichid trilobites. GSA 305370 (GSA Annual Meeting in Seattle, Washington) Paper No. 1-2 Faggetter, L.E., Wignall, P.B., Pruss, S.B., Jones, D.S., & Grasby, S.E. (2017) Mercury enrichments coincident with trilobite extinction at the Cambrian Series 2 – 3 Boundary; an imprint of the Kalkarindji LIP? GSA 296644 (GSA Annual Meeting in Seattle, Washington) Paper No. 331-4 Jacobs, G. (2017) Geometric morphometric ontogeny of Calyptaulax: patterns of physiological change at the meraspid-holaspid transition in phacopids. GSA 304803 (GSA Annual Meeting in Seattle, Washington) Paper No. 1-4 Taylor, J.F. (2017) A new trilobite fauna and associated carbon isotopic excursion at the top of the ptychaspid biomere in eastern Alaska: whittling down a gap in the late Cambrian time scale. GSA 306959 (GSA Annual Meeting in Seattle, Washington) Paper No. 41-2 Adrain, J.M. (2017) Genera are effective surrogates for species richness in deep time: comparisons at multiple scales. GSA 308069 (GSA Annual Meeting in Seattle, Washington) Paper No. 220-1 Hegna, T.A., Martin, M.J., & Darroch, S.A. (2017) Pyritized in situ trilobite eggs from the Ordovician of New York (Lorraine Group): Implications for trilobite reproductive biology. Geology, 45(3):199-202 Alberti, M. (2017) Eigentu¨mliche Trilobiten. In: Wie Phönix aus der Asche – die Fauna des Limoptera-Porphyroids. Fossilien, 2017(1):8-11 Basse, M. (2017) Die ventralseite des Trilobiten Rhenops - eine Terra incognita. Fossilien, 2017(2):32-35 Resch, U., & Rückert, A. (2017) Bizarre Schönheiten - Neues von der Trilobitengattung Ceratarges. Fossilien, 2017(6):15-19 Basse, M., Müller, P., & Ahrens, M. (2017) Die Trilobitengattung Macroblepharum im Devon von Deutschland. Fossilien, 2017(6):20-27 Hartmann, M. (2017) Trilobitenfunde aus mittelkambrischen Geschieben von Sanzkow bei Demmin (Vorpommern). Geschiebekunde Aktuell, 33(1):3-5 Koch, L. & Basse, M. (2017) Die Trilobiten Dechenella und Teichertops in den Oberen Honsel-Schichten (Unter-Givetium) von Ennepetal (Nordrhein-Westfalen). Jahresbericht des Naturwissenschaftlichen Vereins in Wuppertal, 64:63-96 Van Viersen, A.P., Taghon, P., & Magrean, B. (2017) The phacopid trilobites Austerops McKellar & Chatterton, 2009, Hottonops gen. nov. and Loreleiops gen. nov. from the Devonian of the Ardenno-Rhenish Mountains. Neues Jahrbuch für Geologie und Paläontologie-Abhandlungen, 283(1):53-68 Geyer, G. (2017) Trilobites of the Galgenberg Member (Tannenknock Formation), middle Cambrian Stage 5, Franconian Forest, Germany: a paradigmatic lowermost middle Cambrian West Gondwanan fauna. Paläontologische Zeitschrift, 91(1):5-70 Lerosey-Aubril, R., Paterson, J.R., Gibb, S., & Chatterton, B.D.E. (2017) Exceptionally-preserved late Cambrian fossils from the McKay Group (British Columbia, Canada) and the evolution of tagmosis in aglaspidid arthropods. Gondwana Research, 42:264-279 Esteve, J., & Yuan J.L. (2017) Palaeoecology and evolutionary implications of enrolled trilobites from the Kushan Formation, Guzhangian of North China. Historical Biology, 29(3):328-340 Hopkins, M.J. (2017) Development, Trait Evolution, and the Evolution of Development in Trilobites. Integrative and Comparative Biology, 58:488-498 Ameri, H., Yazdim, M., & Bahrami, A. (2017) Pseudophillipsia (Carniphillipsia) (Trilobite) from the Permian Jamal Formation, Isfahan, Iran. Journal of Sciences Islamic Republic of Iran, 28(4):325-336 Hou, J.B., Hughes, N.C., Yang, J., Lan, T., Zhang, X. G., & Dominguez, C. (2017) Ontogeny of the articulated yiliangellinine trilobite Zhangshania typica from the lower Cambrian (Series 2, Stage 3) of southern China. Journal of Paleontology, 91(1):86-99 Geyer, G., & Peel, J.S. (2017) Middle Cambrian trilobites from the Ekspedition Bræ Formation of North Greenland, with a reappraisal of the genus Elrathina. Journal of Paleontology, 91(2):265-293 Loch, J., & Ethington, R. (2017) An integrated trilobite and conodont biostratigraphy across the base of the Laurentian Whiterockian Series (lower Middle Ordovician) at its stratotype, Whiterock Canyon Narrows, Nevada. Journal of Paleontology, 91(2):294-317 Monti, D.S., & Confalonieri, V.A. (2017) Comparing phylogenetics and linear morphometrics to solve the generic assignment of Parabolinella? triarthroides Harrington (Trilobita, Olenidae). Journal of Paleontology, 91(5):919-932 Peng, S., Babcock, L.E., Zhu, X., Lei, Q., & Dai, T. (2017) Revision of the oryctocephalid trilobite genera Arthricocephalus Bergeron and Oryctocarella Tomashpolskaya and Karpinski (Cambrian) from South China and Siberia. Journal of Paleontology, 91(5):933-959 Choi, D.K., & Park, T.Y.S. (2017) Recent advances of trilobite research in Korea: taxonomy, biostratigraphy, paleogeography, and ontogeny and phylogeny. Geosciences Journal, (ahead-of-print publication) Park, T.Y.S., & Kihm, J.H. (2017) Head segmentation of trilobites. Lethaia, 50(1):1-6 Boyer, D.L., & Mitchell, C.E. (2017) Aligned trace fossils from the Utica Shale: implications for mode of life and feeding in the trilobite Triarthrus beckii. Lethaia, 50(1):69-78 Esteve, J., Zhao, Y., & Peng, J. (2017). Morphological assessment of the Cambrian trilobites Oryctocephalus indicus (Reed 1910) from China and Oryctocephalus ‘reticulatus’(Lermontova 1940) from Siberia. Lethaia, 50(1):175-193 Babcock, L.E., Peng, S., & Ahlberg, P. (2017) Cambrian trilobite biostratigraphy and its role in developing an integrated history of the Earth system. Lethaia, 50(3):381-399 Zhao, Y.L., Yuan, J.L., Esteve, J., & Peng, J. (2017) The oryctocephalid trilobite zonation across the Cambrian Series 2-Series 3 boundary at Balang, South China: a reappraisal. Lethaia, 50(3):400-406 Jackson, I.S.C., & Budd, G.E. (2017) Intraspecific morphological variation of Agnostus pisiformis, a Cambrian Series 3 trilobite-like arthropod. Lethaia, 50(4):467-485 Dai, T., Zhang, X.L., Peng, S.C., & Yao, X.Y. (2017) Intraspecific variation of trunk segmentation in the oryctocephalid trilobite Duyunaspis duyunensis from the Cambrian (Stage 4, Series 2) of South China. Lethaia, 50(4):527-539 Esteve, J., Gutiérrez-Marco, J.C., Rubio, P., & Rábano, I. (2017) Evolution of trilobite enrolment during the Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event: insights from kinematic modelling. Lethaia, (ahead-of-print publication) Gutiérrez-Marco, J.C. (2017) Trilobites of exceptional conservation in the Ordovician of Morocco. Enseñanza de las Ciencias de la Tierra, 25(2):250-252 Gutiérrez-Marco, J.C., García-Bellido, D.C., Rábano, I., & Sá, A.A. (2017) Digestive and appendicular soft-parts, with behavioural implications, in a large Ordovician trilobite from the Fezouata Lagerstätte, Morocco. Nature Scientific Reports, 7(39728):1-7 Schoenemann, B., Clarkson, E.N.K, & Høyberget, M. (2017) Traces of an ancient immune system–how an injured arthropod survived 465 million years ago. Nature Scientific Reports, 7(40330):1-9 Laibl, L., Esteve, J., & Fatka, O. (2017) Giant postembryonic stages of Hydrocephalus and Eccaparadoxides and the origin of lecithotrophy in Cambrian trilobites. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 470:109-115 Zong, R.W., & Gong, Y. (2017) Behavioural asymmetry in Devonian trilobites. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 476:158-162 Faggetter, L.E., Wignall, P.B., Pruss, S.B., Newton, R.J., Sun, Y., & Crowley, S.F. (2017) Trilobite extinctions, facies changes and the ROECE carbon isotope excursion at the Cambrian Series 2–3 boundary, Great Basin, western USA. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 478:53-66 Bapst, D.W., & Hopkins, M.J. (2017) Comparing cal3 and other a posteriori time-scaling approaches in a case study with the pterocephaliid trilobites. Paleobiology, 43(1):49-67 Brezinski, D.K. (2017) Trilobites from the Redwall Limestone (Mississippian) of Arizona. Annals of Carnegie Museum, 84(2):165-171 Brezinski, D.K. (2017) Some New Late Mississippian Trilobites from Oklahoma and Arkansas. Annals of Carnegie Museum, 84(2):173-178 Hopkins, M.J., Chen, F., Hu, S., & Zhang, Z. (2017) The oldest known digestive system consisting of both paired digestive glands and a crop from exceptionally preserved trilobites of the Guanshan Biota (Early Cambrian, China). PloS one, 12(9):e0184982 Caprichoso,C., Mateus, S., Sá, A.A., & Legoinha, P. (2017) Devonian Trilobites of the Collections of the Natural History and Science Museum of the University or Porto (Portugal) - a rediscovery. In: A Glimpse of the Past. Abstract book of the XV Encuentro de Jóvenes Investigadores en Paleontología Caprichoso, C., Legoinha, P. Martínez-Graña, A., & Sá, A.A. (2017) Utilização do Google Earth para relocalização de ocorrências de trilobites Calymenina no Devónico de Portugal. In: Livro de Resumos da XXII Bienal da RSEHN, Madrid-Coimbra Korovnikov, I.V. (2017) Influence of paleogeographic conditions for formation complexes of trilobites of the early and middle Cambrian (r. Lena, lower current, Chekurov anticlinal). In: Integral paleontology: development prospects for geological purposes. Paleontological Society of the Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg Terent'ev, S.S. & Gorshenina, V.V. (2017) Unique event of mass "link" trilobites in the upper Ordovician of the west of the Leningrad region. In: Integral paleontology: development prospects for geological purposes. Paleontological Society of the Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg Mychko, E.V., & Alekseev, A.S. (2017) Localities of middle Carboniferous – Permian trilobites in Russia and surrounding countries. Bulletin of the Moscow Society of Naturalists, Geology Series Journal, 92:40-83 Mychko, E.V. (2017) Locations of trilobites of middle-upper Carboniferous and Permian in the Republic of Komi. 26th Scientific Conference, Komi Institute of Geology, Russian Academy of Sciences, 26:149-153 Zaika, Y.U., & Krylov, A.V. (2017) Ordovician erratic trilobites (Arthropoda, Trilobita) from Pleistocene deposits of Belarus (preliminary data). Baranovichi State University Bulletin, 2017:71-81 Shchedukhin, A.Y., & Ratnikov, V.Y. (2017) On the finding of trilobite in the Devonian deposits of the Pavlovsk granite quarry. Voronezh State University, Geology Bulletin, 3:122-123 Korovnikov, I.V., & Novozhilova, N.V. (2017) Middle Cambrian Trilobites from the Vicinity of Dolgii Mys Mountain (Khakassia, Batenevsky Ridge). Paleontological Journal, 51(3):264-272 Sennikov, N.V., Timokhin, A.V., & Lykova, E.V. (2017) Depth differentiation of the middle Ordovician graptolite and trilobite complexes of Gorny Altai. Geologiya i Geofizika, 58(6):880-899 Corbacho, J., & Hammond, K. (2017) Techniques of cleaning and recovery of Moroccan trilobites. Museo Geològico del Seminari de Barcelona, Batalleria, 24:9-16 Corbacho, J., López-Soriano, F.J., Lemke, U., & Hammond, K. (2017) Platypeltoides carmenae: A new Nileidae (Trilobita) from the Lower Ordovician (Tremadocian) of Guelmim area;Western Anti-Atlas, Morocco. Museo Geològico del Seminari de Barcelona, Batalleria, 25:20-29 Chirivella Martorell, J.B., Liñán, E., Dies Alvarez, M.E., & Gozalo, R. (2017) Bailiaspis (Trilobita) with English affinities from the Mansilla Formation (Cambrian Series 3 of the Iberian Chains; NE Spain). Spanish Journal of Palaeontology, 32(1):17-26 Rasmussen, B.W., Rasmussen, J.A., & Nielsen, A.T. (2017) Biostratigraphy of the Furongian (upper Cambrian) Alum Shale Formation at Degerhamn, Öland, Sweden. GFF, 139(2):92-118 Amjad, H. Amjad, A., & Garton, E.R. (2017) Wyominge gracilis ayne: G.novum, Sp.novum. A new trilobite from Carboniferous of Appalachia. Abstracts of the Proceedings of the West Virginia Academy of Science 89(1) Pereira, S.R. (2017) Trilobites of the Upper Ordovician of the Central-Iberian Zone of Portugal. Ph.D. Thesis, Universidade de Lisboa, 714 pages 123 plates Kowalczyk, P, (2017) Biostratigraphy of the Cambrian-Ordovician boundary at Krekling, Norway. M.S. Thesis, University of Oslo, 80 pages Laibl, L. (2017) Ontogeny of selected taxa of middle Cambrian trilobites and agnostoids of the Barrandian area. Thesis, Charles University, Prague, 33 pages Mychko, E.V. (2017) Trilobites of the Middle-Upper Carboniferous and Permian of Northern Eurasia. Thesis, Moscow State University, 24 pages Vyhnánková, I. (2017) Morphology of genal caeca in selected trilobites from the Barrandian area. Thesis, Charles University, Prague, 76 pages Bruton, D.L., & Nikolaisen, F. (2017) The homonyms Brachypleura Angelin, 1854 (Trilobita) and Brachypleura Günther, 1862 (Actinopterygii) with discussion of N. P. Angelin's published work. Bulletin of Zoological Nomenclature, 74:138-141
  10. 6 likes
    FOSSIL FRIDAY is Back -Microraptorine dromaeosaurid Microraptor, Liaoning, China Holotype of the Nodosaurid Panoplosaurus mirus at Canadian National Museum Velocriaptor in Ulaanbaatar Mongolia Holotype skull of Zaraapelta nomadis, a beautiful ankylosaur from the Gobi Desert. Crotholus audeti from southern Alberta is possibly the oldest bone-headed dinosaur in the world at the ROM Tyrannosaurid indet aka: Raptorex kriegsteini. Holotype, Tokyo National Museum of Nature & Science Tyrannosaur extracted from Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument in October. Orbital cavity is top right and look at all those teeth in the lower jaw! Large bone (top left) is a femur and there are tail vertebrae beneath the skull. Possibly Teratophoneus curriei Please note the sketal sheet to the left of the jacket. Looks like paleontologists even need help identifying the bones oh yea this is where the teeth belong....... Duckbill Skulls at the ROM, Late Cretaceous Amazing skull and postcranium of the Triassic early archosaur Youngosuchus sinensis, at the IVPP, Beijing, China. Very cool and something you never want to meet in person. Skulls of the iconic South African dinosaur Massospondylus. Early Jurassic sauropods Skelton of the Tarbosaurus that was sold at auction for $1M that was the center of illegal smuggling trade from Mongolia. The irony is that this skeleton had little scientific value since it was poorly cobbled together from a number of specimens and isolated bones.
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    I might be wrong, but it looks like something in the vicinity of a drum fish mouth plate...minus the teeth of course.
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    Hi @Paleoworld-101 I've collected a couple of distal phalanges from Bothriodont anthracotheres (Bothriodon or Elomeryx) from Hamstead and Bouldnor that closely resemble this. I may be wrong but it looks like it could be the distal phalange from the innermost (first?) finger in the manus, as it matches the size and morphology. Although whether it would be Elomeryx or Bothriodon I don't know. A lot of the turtle phalanges I've seen from the Bouldnor Fm. (haven't found one myself yet) are more 'claw-like' and usually much smaller. Hopefully this helps, Theo
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    Just off Twitter, saw this headline A new genus and species of ornithomimosaur, Afromimus tenerensis, is described based on a fragmentary skeleton from the Lower Cretaceous (Aptian—Albian) El Rhaz Formation of Niger. The holotype and only known individual preserves caudal vertebrae, chevrons and portions of the right hind limb. It is a pay-walled paper. Abstract available. http://www.bioone.org/doi/abs/10.5710/AMGH.23.10.2017.3155
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    I think I might have another possible answer to the feeding traces on this one. At the suggestion of @MarcoSr, I have been corresponding with Jim Gardner at the Royal Tyrrell Museum regarding some unrelated coprolites I'm studying. Jim is officially one of my new favorite people. In the past, this observant fellow had noticed snails feeding on the surface of dog poop. Since I have never personally witnessed this behavior, I never would have thought of it. He sent me some photos he found online, and the traces match up with at least one of my Triassic treasures. Since then, I have been looking into feeding traces and watching videos of gastropods and chitons. I think there is a possibility that the traces on these coprolites may have been made by radula. I can't find any good photos of chiton feeding traces, but their radula do appear to go from the outside in when grazing as shown here. I don't currently know enough to say for sure that these marks were left by chiton or gastropod radula, but offer it as a possibility since either might feed on algae present on the surface of the poop. I would love to hear what those of you more familiar with mollusks think.
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    I think 1 is a hyolithid. Hallotheca sp.
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    I think catfish spine and looks recent to me. Here is a post from the forum on them. The last post, by Harry, is particularly interesting.
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    My brother sent me this rather nice book on fossils today for my birthday. Its not new but it is cool, and very heavy!
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    I agree with @ynot that the tooth is likely a lower anterior, possibly the center most tooth on the left or right side of the lower jaw. I do not agree that the tooth might be C. subauriculatus or C. chubutensis. I am confident that it is C. megalodon.
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    I believe that's a piece of Permian concretionary Magnesian Limestone - it quite often turns up as erratics on the Yorkshire coast. Plenty in situ on the Durham coast.
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    The area in the center looks like Hackle Fringe . "Hackle fringe describes a set of extension fractures that are aligned en echelon and rotated away from the joint axis. ... Fractures that cross-cut a geologic boundary or other geologic structure postdate the formation of that boundary or structure." LINK
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    Good job, Steve. For compartments within the drawers, I prefer plastic organizer boxes. The boxes come in a variety of sizes, and the larger ones (12 and 24 compartments) have removable dividers to accommodate various fossils. I often remove the lid and store it under the box in the drawer. I store surplus fossils in organizer boxes outside of the drawers. Here's an example drawer:
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    Looks like the unidentified fish jaw may be a fragment from the rear/proximal end of the right mandible. For comparison, these are pictures of the same section of a modern Alligator Gar Atractosteus spatula, viewed from a similar angle. (sorry about the poor lighting) Darrow
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    Jack, The shark tooth does look like Alopias grandis. The centrum is from a shark. Sawfish centra don’t have the paired holes.
  24. 5 likes
    so shale wouldn't be sedimentary? Underneath:A strictly morphological classification of fish scales.
  25. 5 likes
    I have seen Pliosaur teeth that look similar to your tooth.
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    I had about an hour and a half to go hunt for fossils today. Someone had been asking to go hunting with me and today was the only time I’d be free to go until after New Years. There has been a lot of construction on highway 75 in McKinney, TX and they took a lot of the rock dug up during construction and dumped it in a field by 75 just north of the county courthouse on the east side of 75. I had seen the piles of construction rock several times and wanted to check out what fossils might be in the McKinney underground. I doubted there would be much of interest, because it’s the Austin Chalk and I live near and on it and there are very few fossils in the chalk that are preserved well and they are mostly chalk clam casts from what I’ve seen. The other things I’ve seen where the actual clam was preserved mostly had fragments of the shell and nothing whole. But I was hoping if it had been dug up maybe it would be preserved better. No such luck, but it was interesting to see. Here are a few pics I took. There were lots of clam remnants, some quite large. Someone can correct me if I’m wrong, but I believe they are Inoceramus clams. This was the dump site. It had been there a while. This is a good example of the colors you will see. The brown to taupe color (on the right) I believe to be the outer layer of the original shell. The yellow and rust color (on the left) is where the original shell pulled away from where the clam was when the chalk split. This slab is about 2 feet long and about as much wide at the top. You can see numerous layers with clam spanning the whole width and length. Sometimes multiple clams were overlaying one another. I put my key fob on this for scale. I think there were 2 clams here. One on top left and another that is only a fragment, but still looks to have been well over 12 inches wide. There were a few specimens where the whole layer of the outer shell was preserved fairly well. This is one of them. I put my hand in the pic for approximate size. I think my hand is about 8 inches long. So this clam was about 5 inches wide. I left my heavy duty hammer and chisel in the car. I tried breaking the rock so I could carry it out, but I didn’t manage to break it. Heres another one of similar size. This one must have been quite large by my estimation, but nowhere near as big as Inoceramus clams get. I read in Wikipedia that one over 3 meters had been found. This could easily have been 20 inches across or more. Most all of the slabs were 2 feet plus. The chalk often split or broke easily, but it was hard to pull apart in the plane of the clam shell in one piece. The fossils were quite fragile and not of the best quality, but they were cool to see. It was an interesting visit, but I wasn’t able to bring much home sad to say.
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    The International Code of Zoological Nomenclature (ICZN) sets most, if not all, of the criteria. The type specimens and associated material used for description must be deposited and cataloged into a university, museum or other repository where others can access them for continued research or re-evaluation. The descriptions and associated written material must also be readily accessible. This usually means published papers, journals or reports from existing universities, museums or other scientific institutions that other researchers would have common access to. It can be self-published, but needs to be distributed to others as well as libraries as best as possible. In the best cases all of the above includes an adequate period of research to make sure the "new" specimen(s) are indeed new and not just variations of an existing species or examples of already described species showing up in new places. For that reason it is best to have full collections of what you believe is a new species, not just single specimens. Some organisms can express a wide morphological variety not to mention differences between gender, juvenile and adult forms. We have all heard the terms splitters and lumpers. Current workers are still sorting out that kind of thing from decades, and even centuries past. And maybe most important, it should also include serious peer review. Other researchers need to be able to take a long hard look at what is being proposed and have a chance to correct and edit before publication. Most journals will not publish a paper without peer review and even then there will be others who immediately publish apposing views and may put into question the new taxon's validity. New names come and sometimes they go. I write all my labels in pencil...;) In the olden days before the ICZN just about anyone could write a paper and describe a new species and it would be considered valid until more work was done. A great example was the "Cincinnati School." A mixed group of professionals, academics and amateurs who, in the late 19th and early 20th century described the great plethora of Late Ordovician fossils found in and around Cincinnati, Ohio. Many where truly great and did excellent jobs sorting out the various species and providing good descriptions. Others were splitters and created new names for the same organism based only on size or location in the strata or the descriptions were a mere paragraph and the morphological terminology followed no common standard. Hope this sheds some light. Erich
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    Just sharing my new book that has just been delivered. Reading up for my trips next year
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    There is actually a book for this that describes the procedure. If you scroll down that page every chapter is summarized. Pretty involved process that can take a couple of years. http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7312/wins06824
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    Aron Ra's "Systematic Classification of Life" is up to the 19th episode and he's still in the Permian Period! There's lots of detail and just enough subtle humor thrown in to keep it fun while we learn which branches our own tree-sap comes from. Here is the newest video but don't skip ahead if you haven't been keeping up. It can be hard to keep track of all of our ancestors when there are so many. This just got published today and there's a new one every few days so start at episode 1 now and maybe number 20 will be done when you're finished.
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    Hey... Staithes, Port Mulgrave, Runswick, Kettleness, Whitby, Ravenscar and a few others in between, all good places to hunt, I take main hammer, little light hammer with small chisel and two large chisels (just incase) loads of various ammonites to be had a long with Ichthyosaur bits n pieces and the occasional Plesiosaur bits, fossil plants and if your really lucky possibly crocodile bits, would wrap up warm and keep your peepers open. Cheers, Alan.
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    Got two cool new pieces in the post today. Both from the Kem Kem beds. First a rather odd bone, I'm not yet completely sure what type of bone this is. But I found the shape interesting so I figured it would make a nice research piece. I'm thinking possibly limb, but it has a weird shape. It appears this bone is also hollow with some seriously thin bone walls. And I now got my third Spinosaurus aegyptiacus quadrate skull bone. This one is probably a juvenile, as it's quite small. It's from the left side of the skull. It'll be interesting to look into the ontogenetic changes as there are some clear differences between this specimen and the two larger ones I have.
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    I think it is a Physogaleus contortus.
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    Beware of the tides, a book of tide times is useful, rockfalls or landslips, can be common in some places so be careful. The coastal path is always a good starting point. Charmouth near Lyme Regis is a good starting point as a lot of information can be gleaned from the Heritage Coast Centre there, as well as organized trips if you like. The Isle of Portland, Purbeck and Lulworth Cove are all worth a visit. Bring warm clothes, it can often be chilly even in summer and good boots and a sturdy bag are a must.
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    There's a great story behind this find. It was discovered by an amateur paleontologist like you and me, Michael Mertens, and he passed along his discovery right away to the right people. A long article was written by him about the find and preparation for our Steinkern magazine back in 2015. It's good to see that the studies have reached their conclusion and that the discovery is important enough to now be shared with the general public. Thanks for sharing.
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    It is very difficult to id a very worn Carcharhinus tooth especially from pictures even if good pictures like yours. The serrations are worn off completely and if the tooth had a nutrient grove or pore they are also worn off. So I don't think you can get an id much better than Carcharhinus sp. Your tooth however is not a copper shark tooth as it has too many remaining features that just don't match those of a copper shark. Check out the link below to compare your tooth. You can see at this link the dentition of a extant copper shark along with the dentitions of a good number of other extant Carcharhinus sharks. There are currently at least 32 named species of extant Carcharhinus sharks. You can see at this link how similar extant Carcharhinus species teeth can be to each other. http://naka.na.coocan.jp/JAWCarcharhinidae.html Marco Sr.
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    Nice! Glyptagnostus reticulatus is an important biozone marker, occurring in a narrow time interval in the Late Cambrian at sites worldwide. I have a couple of pieces like yours, but I've yet to find a complete articulated specimen. Don
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    Well ya, I have to say packages are moving along much smoother than years past. Only a few stragglers out of a lot of players this time. You need a good pat on the back Parker! Just remember my offer is still open for next year. Hopefully we can have many more players in 2018.
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    The matrix is a Kem Kem conglomerate. Many of the fossils are found in these layers.
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    This is far more likely to be a fish cranium.
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    Dracula ticks in amber tell ancient blood-sucking tale By Helen Briggs, BBC News, December 12, 2017 http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-42327784 Feather-Gripping Tick Trapped in Amber Dined on Dinos By Mindy Weisberger, December 12, 2017 https://www.livescience.com/61175-tick-in-amber-dined-on-dinos.html Enrique Peñalver, Antonio Arillo, Xavier Delclòs, David Peris, David A. Grimaldi, Scott R. Anderson, Paul C. Nascimbene, and Ricardo Pérez-de la Fuente, 2017 Parasitised feathered dinosaurs as revealed by Cretaceous amber assemblages Nature Communications 8, Article number: 1924 (2017) doi:10.1038/s41467-017-01550-z https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-017-01550-z Dr Ricardo Pérez-de la Fuente http://www.oum.ox.ac.uk/research/ricardo_perez_de_la_fuente.htm Yours, Paul H.
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    What you are asking for sounds simple enough but not a simple answer. Rex teeth are priced very high, its just the market and the rule of thumb is $1000 an inch (2.5 CM) depending on their Quality. Dealers are always looking for them but smaller teeth just are not around as much and sell quickly because of their lower price. Even partial fat tips sell for ridiculous prices. Smaller teeth pop on auction sites and that's probably the best place to find them. If you are not that sure it's properly identified post it here for an ID. The same is true for bones, auction sites where diggers sell is a good opportunity to find them. I will send you a PM with a few dealers that I can recommend but most like to specialize in teeth because they marketable but carry bones. For me the best place to purchase dinosaur material is shows and the Tucson one is the best for HC material. You can see and touch the specimen and talk with the dealer. In Europe the Munich show in the fall is good and there is at least one in France but Hell Creek material is probably limited. Honestly it takes work to find the right material which meets your needs.
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    Not familiar with large theropods from Yixian formation and the only one I'm aware of is Yutyrannus which is a tyrannosaurid. I tried to do some research but saw nothing describing its teeth. It's difficult to determine how much of the tooth you have but would guess 75% which makes it very large for that fauna. How long is this tooth and is a picture of the base possible. These are the best images of Yutyrannus teeth I could find but do not have a scale for them. These are the two holotype specimens. There are definitely some affinities with your tooth just in general shape but cannot say more than that. Would need to compare it's denticle shape and density with your specimen for more definitive proof. Photos from supplementary information A gigantic feathered dinosaur from the Lower Cretaceous of China Xing Xu, Kebai Wang, Ke Zhang, Qingyu Ma, Lida Xing, Corwin Sullivan, Dongyu Hu, Shuqing Cheng & Shuo Wang Nature 484, 92–95 (05 April 2012) doi:10.1038/nature10906
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    If you are in Scottsdale in Arizona, you could go to Tucson at the end of January and beginning of February to talk to fossil dealers at the Rock and Mineral show to get a good idea of how much it is worth. Or just poke around and see what others like it are selling for, or at least how they are priced. But you will have to go in there convinced that you will not sell it.
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    Thanks if it's South Dakota its Hell Creek. I'm leaning towards Nanotyrannus not because of the length of the tooth but because of the overall shape, the curvature. Here is a photo of the Nano "Jane" and you can see the morphology is similar to yours. Your serrations on inside edge also appear very fine. Can you take a close up of them and also an overall photo of the outside serrations. Thanks
  47. 4 likes
    It matches the morphology of Thesc so that's what I based it on. Very little is published on Pachy so I do not know what the bones look like. “Sandy” is the most complete Pachycephalosaurus individual ever found, with about 50% of the skeleton intact, but unfortunately a technical description of this this specimen has yet to be published. So hopfully someday we will have a glimpse of the toe bones that were with specimen but the feet were far from being complete.
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    Oh snarge I am baffled by this one. The extensive sutures scream baleen whale to me, but I can't really make much sense out of it. It's definitely an isolated, bilateral skull element from an immature whale - no other mammals have a combination of expansive mortised sutures like this and dense bone. It could be an alisphenoid or other element in the basicranium.
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    Cool, how do you get them to stick to the side of the table like that? Magnets?
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    The teeth with the well developed nutrient groves are from sand tiger sharks. There are a number of genera/species of sand tigers present in Morocco and it is very difficult to id them from pictures and with no time period data. Marco Sr.
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