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Showing most informative content since 06/15/2018 in all areas

  1. 18 likes
    It pains me to see a resurgence of Chinese scammers on Facebook, WeChat and Instagram, as business must be good. I've been scammed by them, and so have several people I know. The fossils they advertise are incredible to the point where many of us are tempted. Here, take a look at pics taken from the walls of several confirmed-scammers. Looks amazing, doesn't it? Their price are pretty awesome too, so off you go, transferring $1000 USD to their Western Union, and.... nothing. Your money is gone forever. Here are some warning signs of the Chinese scammers. I will say it again: If these Chinese sellers refuse to use Paypal, be on guard. It doesn't matter how many likes and mutual friends they share with you, scammers can make attractive accounts and add a thousand friends just to look trustworthy. Right now, there's a scammer Facebook account that shares over 100 mutual friends with me. Someone posted on his wall complaining of a scam, and the seller removed it within a day. Check the seller's track records. Ask friends and trusted collectors if any of them have ever made successful dealings with the seller. Keichousaurus does not count! I know a case where a friend bought a single cheap Keich from someone on Instagram, and the same seller then went out to scam others with far more expensive fossils after getting the seal of approval from the first guy. Also, take note not all of them admit to being from China. I know a scammer who claims to be from USA. His fossil pictures are similar to other Chinese scammers. When my friend pretended to make a purchase, this seller gave a Chinese address for Western Union, and an Alipay account pointing to a Chinese name too. For more info, please refer to this previous thread > Remember, if it's too good to be true, it probably isn't. If you have any doubts or questions, please feel free to ask others on TFF. There are many experts here who can offer you advise. If you require more info on these scammers, feel free to PM me.
  2. 12 likes
    My father was an artist who did quite a bit of sculpture in wood and stone. Unfortunately I did not inherit his ability to draw and sculpt. He always said that he basically knew what was hiding in the piece of wood or soapstone from the time he saw it. He said the animal or abstract work was always in there it was just waiting for him to take the crud off what was obstructing the view. Well prepping trilobites is very much like that . You need to figure out the best way to present the bug really before you start the prep. You need to visualize the end product. Here is a Platteville isotelus that I received from a client in a 2 to 3 pound hunk of matrix. Not a lot to see at first but definitely a bug that is just screaming "Let me out of here"..... Also a bug that is desperately in need of a prep. Any time you can see an eye or better yet two eyes on an isotelus you pretty much know that there is a good chance that it will be complete I started by trimming the matrix down to a size and shape that would be condusive to prepping and wound have a nice asthetic shape when complete. I wanted the bug to be 3D when complete so I use a dremel to make a grid pattern around the fossil. These pedestal islands then just pop off with my ARO scribe leaving a matrix that is not just square edges. Square edges look horrible on a complete fossil, just not natural looking. This takes all of 5 minutes as opposed to perhaps a good hour if I had used just a scribe. I also minimize the potential for the matrix to fracture through the fossil by doing it this way. Just be careful not to cut too deep As per usual this was prepped under a scope using a comco MB1000 unit and a variety of scribes (Aro, Seally, 9361 and a Pferd) The abrasion material was previously used 40 micron dolomite with mostly a . 030 and . 018 nozzle tip. This is about 45 minutes into the prep The extra pygidium on the bug was removed and will be added back beside the bug at the end of the prep. Progress is being made about an hour into prep About 15 minutes later it is starting to get 3D Almost done at this point Pretty much finished except for adding that extra pygidium back beside the bug then final cleanup to remove any tool marks and packing up to ship There is zero restoration or gluing on this trilobite, although the right eye is dis-articulated it is 100% complete. Total time invested ... about 2 hours ...............cost to client $45 US plus shipping. Original estimate was $50 so pretty close. The finished bug is 35 mm long from nose to end of pygidium. The matrix now weighs about 1 1/2 pounds which is always important to watch out for. Anything over about 4 pounds is stupid expensive to ship from Canada. The suture on the right side of the eye has dis-articulated a bit from the bug but it is all there and shows how clean the sutures can come apart.
  3. 12 likes
    Overview of the teaching fossil gardens to "train" the eyes of my guests to really see fossils. The strom garden is by the fossil barn. Then we stroll over to the cephs. These are all "junk" fossils as I picked them up. Pretty cool though and I encourage people to handle them to get a feel for the field. I have a sandbox for the kids of St. Peter Formation sand and filled with junk Ordo fossils and sharks teeth, etc. from Morocco donated by a TFF friend, and a few minerals. The kids absolutely love it! We find mostly horn corals here. The bryozoans, or moss animals, are very common. As are death plates, hash plates, of brachs. Very few good crinoid specimens here. Oolite, dendrites and other geologics go here. Trace fossils. Fisherites are a common find with their waffle pattern and cross section ladders. About 40% are fluorescent. TFF member Papa Dave taught me to circle the trilo molts. And of course the snail trail - I love my snails! The members of TFF have shared so much of their knowledge and enthusiasm for fossils with me that I thought some might like to see the fruits of their many labors with trying to help me understand what I am finding here in southeast Minnesota. To all of my Fossil Friends, THANK YOU SO MUCH for your Knowledge, Patience, and Kindness! :-) I hope you have enjoyed this little trip around my fossil barn and yard and that perhaps it inspires you in some small way to reach out and share the joys of fossil hunting with others.
  4. 8 likes
    I love fossils from the Burgess Shale and came across this just released paper on Waptia fieldensis, very informative publication http://rsos.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/5/6/172206
  5. 7 likes
    https://www.theguardian.com/science/2018/jun/20/tongue-tied-t-rex-couldnt-stick-out-its-tongue https://www.cnet.com/news/t-rex-most-dinosaurs-couldnt-stick-out-their-tongues/
  6. 7 likes
    I talked about this elsewhere but so everyone has a chance to view it, here is a video showing a CT scan we (TMDC) did of a jacket with 5 eggs. The eggs are currently unknown and likely new, the main goal of the scan was to help determine if there are any embryonic remains inside. CT scans often are not ideal for showing bone so what we looked for were teeth since they tend to show up better in a scan and develop at a relatively early stage. Happy to answer any questions people may have about this. A local news story on the scan: http://www.choteauacantha.com/news/article_623de0fe-be6f-11e7-84df-5363c8eab191.html
  7. 7 likes
    A quick iPhoney pic of a foot cast while on The Isle of Wight whilst i had a couple off hours of work.
  8. 6 likes
    Here's a good assortment of my finds from 3 trips into the late Cretaceous of New Jersey earlier this spring. It's a mix of Wenonah and Navesink formation fossils from the late Campanian. The best finds were 2 pretty nice hadrosaur teeth for NJ but there's a good variety of material including a shamer broken plesiosaur tooth, small mosasaur tooth, a nice Ischyodus (ratfish) palatine mouth plate, a few sharks teeth (mostly Scapanorhynchus and Squalicorax) and more. There's even 2 small pieces of heteromorphic ammonite in there, Nostoceras hyatti and Didymoceras. Let me know if you'd like any more specific identifications.
  9. 6 likes
    I am often asked by people "Is this worth prepping?" The answer often is that it all depends. There is no guarantee that an unprepped specimen will be complete or that it will even prep out nicely. Some specimens are just to thin skinned or flakey or there really is little actual fossil there (mostly cast). It is my experience that prepping most common fossils will not increase the value of a specimen by as much as the prep will cost. If an average eldredgeops from New York costs about $20 to $50 to have prepped, depending on mostly the size, is it really worth prepping it when you can buy one for say $35 to $50 that is already prepped. A lot of the people I prep for it is the "first" of a species or the first prone trilobite that they ever found. So it is the associated value to them that makes the fossil worth prepping. I recently prepped a ceraurus for a US customer that was the first ceraurus he/she had found and was in their opinion the best trilobite they had ever found. Here is a picture of how it looked unprepped as I received it. It was obvious to me that there was a missing left genal spine and that the pygidial spines would likely not be complete. I relayed this information to the owner along with a preparation cost estimate of $60 to $100 US depending on how the bug responded to preparation and what if any repairs were needed. So the question is would I have paid that amount to have a bug prepped that would not be museum quality pristine when it was completed. For me the answer is likely not because I have quite a few pristine ceraurus already and although this one looked to be large and highly inflated it probably would not end up with a place in my display cabinet. So for me the answer was not that hard to come to. Equally for the owner of this bug it was an easy decision as it was in their opinion likely the best specimen if not the only specimen they were likely ever to find themselves as this one had taken countless years of collecting to find. Here is the bug about an hour into prepping. Very little scribe work was done as there was very little bulk matrix. All prep work is done under an Olympus zoom scope at 10 to 20x magnification. The initial air abrasion was done on a Comco MB1000 at 50 to 60 PSI using 40 micron dolomite with a .025 nozzle. An interesting and unexpected surprise was to find the hypostome still attached to the bug.. Given this knowledge in advance I would likely have prepped this for myself if it was mine as I do not have a ceraurus with hypostome intact. Now here is the almost completed bug. Final prep was done with a .015 nozzle at 30 PSI with 40 micron dolomite. A few small minor repairs can be seen in white which still need to be colour matched to the fossil . These were not burn throughs from over abrasion but actual defects in the fossil that I felt repairing would enhance the final aesthetics of the specimen. Remember this is going into a collection of an older amateur collecting enthusiast that has not found a lot of trilobites in their life. Note how highly inflated the specimen is By the way that is the pygidial spines from another ceraurus in front of the lip of the big bug. Now I am probably breaking a Peppers secret society rule by disclosing the cost for the prep. There is very little information on the internet regarding actual costs for having a fossil prepared. We seem to be like magicians not wanting to disclose our trade secrets. People are often surprised by how much it actually costs to get a fossil prepped. By the time you take electricity, supplies and wear and tear on the equipment (not to mention the original investment in the equipment) Preparators are lucky to get a minimum wage. My hats off to those who eke out a living this way. So what did it actually cost....... $80 US plus shipping ....... What s the bug worth.... well priceless to the owner. So here's the question.... would you have paid to have this bug prepped knowing what the costs was going to be.. Now gotta get back to matching the colour on those white spots.... Hate doing that worst part of the whole prep
  10. 6 likes
    Pterotheca saffordi description & figures: Wahlman, G.P. 1992 Middle and Upper Ordovician symmetrical univalved mollusks (Monoplacophora and Bellerophontina) of the Cincinnati Arch region. United States Geological Survey Professional Paper, 1066-O:1-213 PDF LINK original description: Hall, J. 1861 Upon some new and other species of fossils, from the rocks of the Hudson-river group of Ohio and the western states; with descriptions. Annual report of the Regents of the University of the State of New York on the State Cabinet of Natural History, 14:89-109
  11. 6 likes
    Wow could be a composite hard to positively say. The dorsal view there is a slight difference in width between front and back half. Could also be that the claw was broken in several areas, see arrows, and in the middle and poorly joined with fill. Then there is the difference in texture. If broken could have been in different in matrix hence preservation differences, doubt it but? Fill area suggesting its reassembled or composited. Is it a theropod claw cannot say for sure. Kem Kem claws are very poorly understood. Its not your typical theropod slam dunk claw morphology. Its length versus narrowness could suggest Crocodyilomorph just dont have answers. I would pass for one with more certainty, why risk it.
  12. 6 likes
    A big rooted Carcharodontosaurus tooth is listed with only glue filled fractures. If you are interested, its the root that adds the big premium to the final price. My concern is with all the fill on the root, outlined in white, and in the end how much of the real root is present.
  13. 6 likes
    A partial Spinosaurus jawbone being offered. In my opinion this is a Crocodile jaw. Height to narrow and tooth sockets too far apart to be Spinosaurid. Labial ridge also to narrow. Same comment for this one
  14. 5 likes
    Admin please move to appropriate topic if needed. :-) Fillmore County, Minnesota, USA - the most fossiliferous county in Minnesota Ordovician Mostly Galena Formation Whispering Winds, Spring Valley, MN I thought I would share some pics of my fossil barn that I have been remodeling on a budget. There are some ideas here that others may be able to make use of. :-) Overview of the outside of the barn. Note the trilobite cutout an pterodactyl toy at the peak. Galena Formation large cephalopod. The hitching rail is nice to use as a comparison to the approximate size this orthocone ceph may have been. The kids love this dinosaur island in the old wooden watering tank. I give fossil tours and host fossil birthday parties. :-) The fossil prep table is open to guests. I have a grinder and brush, a couple of engravers ($7 from Harbor Freight), a dremel tool, and $5 3 magnification visors. Lori turned me onto a mini microscope for less than $5 off Amazon. I also make wire wrapped fossil jewelry here. This wall was created using pallet boards that were stained or washed with paint. Everything is pieced together like a puzzle. I had a couple of gals here wwoofing (wwoofusa.org), trading time for experience and room and board, and they loved doing this creative work. They also put up the reclaimed tin ceiling and I put different reclaimed tin down as wainscote. Note between the 2nd and 3rd window the dried mushrooms being used as shelves and decorations. I'm wanting to add shelves in the windows at the pane lines for more fossil display and greyed wood shelves supported by rusted chain, eventually. I had some 1880s cedar shingles and put them up on two of the walls around some pallet shelving. The pallets are super sturdy shelving for fossils and FREE! Some more pallet shelving and I used some cut off ends for a few papers. I keep my gear in the barn also. Sometimes I use it as a woodworking shop. I like to work in live edge cedar. Kids and adults all enjoy this old aquarium with a black light in the hood as a fluorescent fossil display. I have rock and minerals in it as well. The walk-in door to the hen house is in the fossil barn, I also raise white homing pigeons and ducks. So this pterodactyl is a lead in to the descendants of the dinosaurs. :-) Now to the gardens...
  15. 5 likes
    One thing to note is that these fossils often have a complex taphonomic history. I have Oxytropidoceras specimens from the Killeen area (Walnut Formation) that are somewhat deformed (flattened) internal molds completely lacking shell, with oysters and other epifauna directly attached to the mold. The sequence of taphonomic events must have been: 1. Ammonite is buried and becomes filled with fine calcarious sediment (both living chamber and phragmocone). 2. Shell dissolves leaving the internal mold. The mold is stiff clay, able to hold its shape, but not yet completely lithified (turned to rock). 3. As the mold is buried deeper and deeper in the sediment, pressure causes it to flatten a bit. This is quite evident if you look at the groove formed where earlier whorls fit into later whorls. 4. The overlying sediment is eroded away, leaving the mold exposed on the sea floor. 5. The mold is colonized by oysters and other organisms seeking a firm substrate. 6. The mold and associated epifauna is once again buried and the epifauna becomes fossilized and the mold completely lithified. 7. The fossil is exposed again by erosion, and this time it is collected. Don
  16. 5 likes
    Congrats on all your finds. Rattlesnake is likely one of the few sites in Florida not under 8 feet of water. There are few croc fossil teeth in florida compared to gator. Florida Croc looks like this: Note lots of longitudinal lines. Gator has one Carina on each side , like this. I think that you have gator. Nice find!!!
  17. 5 likes
    Thank you for the confirmation always good to get a professionals opinion on our calls, you never know. Unfortunately sellers always like to associate a type of dinosaur with eggs or eggshells they offer for sale, makes for a more sellable product. Buyers conversely like to see the type of dinosaur they come from and ..oolithus names are foreign to both but the most serious collector. Forums like this help change that thinking.
  18. 5 likes
    An old post I know, but wanted to confirm that you guys are correct. Those eggshell fragments are very likely Megaloolithus and in remarkable shape too. There are many features which distinguish dinosaur eggshell from other types of eggshell, in the field with just a hand lens, we focus on a variety of factors including thickness, density, pore spacing and pore count. Just to repeat what I said elsewhere: Without embryonic remains within an egg it is near impossible to scientifically link an egg or eggshell type to the animal who laid it. Megaloolithus is the egg type often listed as Hypselosaurus eggs, and while that may be accurate, it is not yet supported by any findings. Megaloolithus does likely come from a Sauropod and perhaps even a Titanosaur but without further findings, there is no way to conclusively state anything further.
  19. 5 likes
    I’ve been looking through Miocene matrix from France from two sites lately. I’m posting a few pictures of what I have been finding. Note the gem jars are 1.75 inches in diameter for size reference. Site 1 I have not found many fossils in the matrix from this site. However, I did find lower teeth from two species that I don’t find on the East Coast of the United States where I usually collect. What I found in total: Centrophorus aff. granulosus 3 mm X 3 mm Deania aff. calceus 2 mm X 1.5 mm Site 2 I found many more specimens in the matrix from this site. Cookie Cutter (Isistius) teeth are very common in the matrix although most specimens are missing the roots. Cookie Cutter (Isistius triangulus ) specimens: The rest of what I found: Marco Sr.
  20. 5 likes
    Went digging for a couple days at a microsite up in the Lance Formation of Wyoming. Along with the usual many Triceratops and Edmontosaurus spitter teeth, I found a Nanotyrannus tooth, a perfectly rooted Leptoceratops gracilis tooth, a neat Nodosaur tooth (Denversaurus?), and a nice big Triceratops crown. The find I wanted to share is the Leptoceratops tooth. Before prep and then post prep: Leptoceratops gracilis Tooth Late Cretaceous Lance Formation Niobrara County, WY USA
  21. 5 likes
    Hey that's my tooth! That's a fair question DFB. I have looked at this tooth very closely under magnification and have confidently identified this tooth as being Baryonyx because of the wrinkled enamel and it is only slightly fluted on the crown. Croc teeth are strongly fluted and don't show the same wrinkled surface. I tried to get the wrinkled surface to show more clearly in the pics but because it's a microscopic feature, but it has been a challenge, this is the best I could manage using basic camera equipment. Hope this helps. Cheers.
  22. 5 likes
    looks genuine and not too bad tome. It is common for the root to be brown while the crown is black. Isolated teeth, though, can only be labeled as 'Ceratopsian' since Triceratops and Torosaurus occur in the same beds and their teeth are identical.
  23. 5 likes
    Ha ha you should not see any grain in the roots but more of an enamel surface. They are hard to find since the root area is very fragile why you see lots of repair on them. A complete tooth includes the root why some collectors seek them out. Lots of collectors also just focus on crowns, all good whatever turns you on. Don't hesitate to post any purchase concerns before you buy. Great hobby and you are correct Moroccan teeth are not budget breaker. Example of Carcharodontosaurids with roots to see what they look like
  24. 5 likes
    A near complete, partly enrolled Paladin sp. found a couple of days ago, lying in three pieces in a pile of disintegrating mudstone. Brigantian stage (Mississippian), N.E. England, UK. I spent ages unsuccessfully looking for the missing bit but never mind, it's still the nearest to a whole one I've found for about four years - decent Carboniferous trilobites are generally hard to come by though moulted bits are quite common at the site. This stuff falls apart when wet and another spell of rain would have completely destroyed it. Apart from gluing, no prepping was needed. 1.5cm long
  25. 5 likes
    Hello my friend @PaleoSHAZZ . Welcome to TFF, and receive a warm hug from here of Argentina! I am very sorry as well as the others, I also bear bad news, because I know very well how painful this can be, believe me, I was already deceived by a dishonest seller who sold me a piece of Siderite as if was Coprolite. To be honest, I believe that many people here within the TFF have been deceived at least once in their lives, and we take this as a lesson and learning so that it will not happen again. And there is only one way to do this, that is, to study a lot of what you want to buy. After you have studied and already have some knowledge about it, then yes the purchase is recommended. We can not allow salespeople to be the experts and thus we are forced to believe their words and "certificates," but rather we must study hard and be experts, and unfortunately there is no other way than this. I do not wish to be redundant and act like a parrot, repeating what everyone has already said, but actually your "specimen" containing two supposed starfish, is 100% fake! Once that I am not seeing any morphological and anatomical detail, but rather all I am seeing are likely brush strokes of iron oxide powder, mixed with a little gypsum powder with water to make the the stars, and after dry, grooves in the rock to imitate the contours and nothing more... By way of comparison, I am placing here, a legitimate fossil starfish (Stenaster sp.) that is deposited in my private collection. It is from the Upper Ordovician - Approximately 449 Million years. It was discovered in the Ktaoua Formation, Idem Ouachene, Istlhou, Morocco. And you will notice how rich it is in anatomical and morphological detail as a whole: Note: According to my spy contacts, I am suspicious that our Moroccan friend @Tidgy's Dad also has in his collection a legitimate starfish fossil! And the fossil star of the Sea can be identified in the red arrow, in our image of high spying through satellite!
  26. 4 likes
  27. 4 likes
    Here is a picture of the area from which those two brachiopod-laden rocks came from (I pulled them out from around the tree's roots)... And here is what Viola was doing while I was extracting the rocks... After a couple of hours hunting along the creek, we enjoyed some sandwiches (and more brownies) under the shade of a large tree, after which time we hopped back into my car to drive to our second site: Etobicoke Creek in Mississauga. The fossils here are also from the Georgian Bay Formation (Upper Ordovician). Here's a picture of Viola watching Roger do some exploratory hammering... And here are Viola and Roger posing for a picture - in it, Roger might be holding the rock that he kept from this location - it contained three orthoconic nautiloids... After a couple of hours of hunting at this locale, we were in for a treat as we trekked back to my car: a deer ran out in front of us and posed for a picture!!! Once back at the car, we drove back to my house where we enjoyed a couple of adult beverages and some dinner (which consisted of pasta and still more brownies). Thanks for the wonderful day yesterday, Roger, as well as the stunning gifts!!! Hopefully we can do this again next year when you trek to Canada once again! Monica
  28. 4 likes
    It could be the remnants of an old reef, like these pics of a Cretaceous oyster reef uncovered here in N.C. t, it could be coquina. Like I said it has many different looks.
  29. 4 likes
    It is an "egg"nomoly, a pyrite or marcasite nodule. Where was it found and what formation is it from? Texas? It looks like the pyrite nodules found in the Cretaceous Austin Group rocks in Texas.
  30. 4 likes
  31. 4 likes
    There a few reasons, one, any egg can have remains, unlikely but it is possible, second, the Two Medicine Fm. has a relatively high proportion of eggs containing embryos or recently hatched individuals, for example Troodon and Maiasaura. Third, embryonic remains are vital for an actual animal ID as I talked about with my other post, so any chance of them being present must be investigated. One dig participant did find what they thought was an embryonic bone, however this does not appear to actually be the case. In addition to looking for embryonic material the scan gives us information on the infill, the true shape of the eggs, and reveals anything which could otherwise not be seen within them, sometimes insects can be found near an egg for example. We may try a more powerful X-ray to gain a better view of the inside. A CT was nice and easy since the local clinic was willing to provide us access, it gave us a starting point and a great deal of additional information.
  32. 4 likes
    Trilobase is one of the ones readily available. It apparently doesn't run natively on Macs, but there is something (Bootcamp?) that can run windows programs. Sorry, ... I don't do Apple.
  33. 4 likes
    These bones from the Kem Kem Beds of Morocco are being offered for sale as Spinosaurus Phalanx Toe Bones. They appear to be carpals, hand bones, and most likely from one of the Spinosaurid's in that fauna. Please note that I've yet to find any technical paper that describes any Spinosaurid hand bones The seller indicates only some glued and fill fractures however the excessive matrix on both these carpals might indicate otherwise. The distal end of the carpal on the right appears to have lots of "fill"
  34. 4 likes
    It is a pufferfish mouthplate.
  35. 4 likes
    Hi Jeff, it is a ghost shrimp burrow piece. The "matrix" is actually another burrow channel.
  36. 4 likes
    I'm fairly confident it is a gastropod, along the lines of Pterotheca or maybe Bucanopsis. Don
  37. 4 likes
    If you take Highway 91 south of Idaho Falls about ten minutes, just south of the tiny town of Firth there is Wolverine Road that leaves the highway and goes into the Wolverine Canyon area of the Blackfoot Mountains. All of the limestone cliffs and rubble in this canyon are full of fossil coral from the Mississippian age, roughly 350 million years old. There are also gastropods and brachiopods, though they are harder to find.
  38. 4 likes
  39. 4 likes
    I think that the fossil Forum"s "auctions to benefit the forum" is the best place to get a great deal on purchasing fossils.
  40. 4 likes
    Never feel silly posting its getting it right what counts. Thats a super value for that tooth. Carter County is Hell Creek country.
  41. 4 likes
    I would agree that this may be shark cartilage. Possibly from a xenacanth type shark. very nice!
  42. 4 likes
    Lots of different spino teeth with roots are being offered. Please exercise caution lots of fill and resto with teeth Spinosaurus being offered . Photos show 3 different offerings. Museum quality dorsal vertebra being offered from a Carcharodontosaurus. Looks more like Croc and there appears to be fill around some of the processes. Museum grade Spinosaurus toe with claw being offered. What you have is a Spinosaurid foot claw with a carpal, hand, bone. The back end of the claw looks funny may have some fill, blood groove looks fabricated.
  43. 4 likes
    Wow, I am impressed by the level of expertise. Yes, Carpenter's book is the best resource outside of reading the scientific papers and even then, his book can nicely summarize the important points. For the most part, the consensus is correct if it is an egg or not. The only major point I would like to add is the above picture is not likely Maiasaura, if it is then the shell is highly altered. The surface ornamentation for Maiasaura in simple terms looks similar to river channels and the nodes are not as rounded as those in the picture. Again, it could be Miasaura but given the eggshell does not show any obvious diagenetic overprinting to match what would be necessary alterations, I doubt it is. Here is an example of Maiasura eggshell.
  44. 4 likes
    Hey, Lori! I'll let the others have the last word, so this is me sneaking in first to do the bits I can! 1. Not a clue. I'll go as far as 'orthid'... 2. The complete one is an articulated articulate brachiopod. 'Articulated' versus 'disarticulated' refers to whether the two shells are still together as in life. These clear are. 'Articulate' versus 'inarticulate' refers to the arrangement of muscles and hinge structures, and is a taxonomic term; broadly, articulates have calcite shells, and inarticulates have phosphatic ones. It actually gets a bit complicated (craniids have inarticulate phosphatic shells...), and the terminology is now rather outdated. We mostly now use 'lingulate' for inarticulates, and 'rhynchonelliform' for calcitic, articulate brachiopods like this one. 3. I don't think it was attached in life; the pedicle was soft, and came from a tiny hole in the middle of the umbo (look in the middle of the projecting bit of the pedicle valve in the ventral view). In this case, if the holes in each lined up, then I'm wondering at a boring organism (e.g. a sipunculan) that burrowed its way through the two shells. The crack looks like post-mortem damage to me (crushing of the shell, probably after burial), with some sort of iron minerals growing in the microenvironment. Now, lets see what the brachiopodophiles can add or disagree with..!
  45. 4 likes
    @Nimravis sent me a package that arrived this week. It was a heavy package. As some of you may know I am fond of concretions and nodules. Septarian nodules are my favorite kind of nodule, besides the ones with fossils inside that is. I find septarians uniquely beautiful. I love the crystal. I have found many around North Central Texas. I have found nodules in many places, but have not been anywhere else that I have found septarians. Anyway, to my package. It had 2 items inside. Here they are. Here is the first one. It is a septarian nodule from Utah that has been cut and polished. Ralph said he found this one and the other half at a garage sail many years ago and bought them for one of those unbelievable bargains that you can only find at garage sales and thrift stores. It weighs about 16 pounds. It is a whopper. See the cluster of crystals in the center. There is an open crevasse of crystals to the left of it, but to the bottom right of it, about 4:00 it looks like there is a large open crevasse of crystals, but it is flat, flush with the crystals in the center. I love how it has a 3 dimensional look even though it is smooth and flat. This is the other side of it. This is how septarians often look. They have veins of crystals, usually either yellow and/or brown and occasionally clear to white. Around here the crystals are usually calcite with some aragonite as well. In between the veins of crystal is a fine sedimentary rocks that is much softer than the crystal. The rock will erode away in polygonal shapes. The crystal forms inside of the concretion and grows outward. Eventually the exterior of the nodule will weather away and the veins are revealed like you see below. I have one little piece that I found last year where the sedimentary rock completely eroded away leaving behind only the crystalline structures. One of the crystalline structures looks a bit like flower petals and is sitting atop some kind of sea shell fossil with a bit of nacre showing. Here are some close ups of the crystal features. This area is all flat and smooth. I love how it looks 3D around the edges of the brown. Looks like it may need a bit of a polish to remove some cracks, but it is an awesome piece regardless. I wanted to show this pic because it shows the 3D structure pretty well where it is flat and smooth and there are no crevasses. There is a crevasse on the very top left where it is almost black about 11 o'clock, past where the crystals are a smoky grayish color. There is another one on the top right about 2 o'clock away from the center. Besides those 2 little spots the surface is flat and smooth. This is a close up of the bottom left of the crystal cluster above. The surface is as smooth as glass, but you would swear that there was a change in elevation or a gap or something, but it is all the illusion of the play of light on the crystals. I think it amazing how it does that. I hope I never lose my sense of wonder at such things. It means I will never get board. This isn't the clearest pic, but you can get the general idea. I think it is interesting how the brown outline is interrupted. Not sure what causes that. Most of the areas make a full circuit, but not these two. It looks like they were once joined there on the left. Maybe they arose from shell fragments that were broken. Ralph also sent me this Mazon nodule. He said he would have thrown it away, but knew I like septarian nodules. Throw it away?! It would be a shame. The septarian crystals do not appear to have worked their way to the surface or the surface has not weathered away to reveal them. I don't know if Ralph split it or it split naturally. Here is a view of the inside. They are 2 matching halves. The crystals are white with a few black. I assume they are either aragonite or calcite. Anyone have any thoughts on the crystals. They are extremely fine crystals. So fine it is difficult to capture their shape. One black one looks like a tiny nugget and could be jet, but the others are very small and fine. That is what Ralph sent me. I love both of them. I need to figure out where to put that big one. It is almost as big as some of my ammonites I have in the house. Thank you again Ralph! I love them both!
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    They resemble the oyster genus Pseudoperna. Pseudoperna congesta is common in the Turonian and younger Late Cretaceous formations in the western interior seaway, but I don't know about Texas or about the Albian (the age for Oxytropidoceras). Don
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    Pleurocystites cf. P. squamosus Collected April 2018 Finished preping 6/8/18 Ordovician Galena Formation Prosser Member Minnesota
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    Welcome to the Forum. To me, this looks like an ironstone concretion. Sorry, not a seed. Regards,
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    Spent a few days in Montana at a Channel Deposit. Mostly found Teeth and a Thescelosaurus vertebra You can tell you are in Montana Sites are pretty remote Backhoe helps with overburden removal Black line overburden - 5 to 10 feet. Red lines the Hell Creek Layer 3 feet \\\ Typical Theropod tooth discovery A number of items went to a prep person in SD that I could not manage. Will Post those when I get them back. Edmontosaurs Carpals Crocodile Material Hadrosaur Teeth Theropod Teeth - all need to be prepped and will post at a later date including a couple of small rex teeth not in the photo Did find these to tiny teeth that I was able to clean up. Acheroraptor Richardoestesia sp.
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