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Showing most informative content since 09/12/2018 in all areas

  1. 14 likes
    I didnt know where to post this? Its not prepped. It was just found, but sadly, not by me. I just wanted to show this to folks. Too cool not too. If its in the wrong place, please move it. Thanks. My best buddy goes to England every year to metal detect. He met my other buddy, Al Lang, whilst on one of those trips and they became freinds. I was just sent these photos this morning. Really really cool. I only wish that I could prep something like this. Supposed to be 19 Eurypterids on it. Just Wow!!! RB
  2. 13 likes
    More pics of my rex tooth
  3. 11 likes
    About a month ago I went to Penn with two fossil buddies and they both found prone greenops. Sadly I did not find one. However both of these greenops were split between the positive and negative and probably were missing some skin as the material was quite flaky. For one of my friends this was his first ever find of a prone greenops. Prone greenops that are nicely laid out are a very rare find in the Windom shale. Most of the ones I have found from there or others that I have prepped for people are fully, partially enrolled or distorted. So to my fossil buddy this was a bit of a special find. We wrapped up the two pieces in tin foil in the field and I agreed to take it with me and prep it for him. Well zoom ahead a month in time and I am going out with him last week to collect and he asks how is his greenops coming, whereby I realize that I have not only not started it ,but in my senility had forgotten I had it and had no clue where it was. Well when I got home it turns out that I had never unpacked the bucket of fossils from that trip and low and behold his fossil was packed just as we had left it. A careful look at both parts under the scope confirmed my opinion that the bug was in pretty rough shape , but a prone greenops, not to mention perhaps his first ever prone warranted we attempt to bring it back to life. Unfortunately I did not take any pics until a ways into the prep but here is what I did to start. 1. Washed the mud off both plates scrubbing with a tooth brush 2. Squared up what would become the fossil plate with the diamond gas saw 3. Cut out as small as possible a square from the top piece of the matrix that contained the top part of the greenops using my 7 inch tile saw with diamond blade 4. On a belt sander using aluminum oxide 120 grit thinned the top piece as much as safely possible to help minimize my prep time later. 5. Using super thin cyanoacrylate glue reattached the top portion to the main slab clamping tightly with a c-clamp. Asusual all prep was done under a zoom scope at 10x to 20x magnification using a Comco abrasion unit and in this case a German Pferd MST 31 scribe exclusively.. Not a lot of scribing was done other than to outline the bug as the skin was not in great shape. Abrasion was pretty much done with a .18 and .10 nozzle using 40 micron previously used dolomite at 30 PSI. Here is the bug after about an our of prepping . I have outlined in red where you can still see the outline of the section that was glued down. A lot of people do not realize that many of the fantastic trilobites you see on the market have actually been glued back together because the splits are often through the bug. I once did a Moroccan trilobite that was in 7 pieces when I received it Here is the bug after another 40 minutes Took some pictures of the prep but frankly they ended up too blurry to use so here is the prep after abrasion is complete and after I have repaired a lot of the parts that broke of in the split. I tend to use a white repair material and always take a picture to let the owner know what has been repaired Here is the bug after coloration applied . The repairs were allowed to cure overnight before coloration and a bit of extra carving to clean up spots.Just waiting for me to do a final cleanup tomorrow after everything has cured a bit more. A long way from being the worlds most pristine or perfect bug but I am relatively pleased that we were able to breath some new life into an ailing bug. Totally prep time about 3 1/2 hours over 4 days. I suspect the owner will be pleased with the result. I have seen people toss bugs in the field that were in this type of shape. For those of you who just need to know the bug is 27mm x 18 mm A slightly different view
  4. 10 likes
    Hi guys, last week I was on holiday in Austria and had the chance to hunt at the area of Adnet. There you can find fossils in the red "Adneter Schichten" which are lower jurassic deposits. I was there twice for about 4 hours at all and I found some cool stuff! At my first visit I found plenty of ammonites, one nautilus and some bivalves. It was a very rainy day. Here is a picture of the site: And this is the only ammonite I could prepped until now: Its a 5 cm long Phylloceras. A kinda common species there. The prep work is really difficult, because there is no really separation layer between stone and fossil. I didnt prepped the nautilus until now so I can you show a picture of the unprepped example: On my second visit the weather was very good (maybe even too hot ). Because of that and because of the enormous luck I had I found some shark teeth I didnt really expect to find one although I had already saw some teeth from there on the internet. But I didnt found one I found many Here are the 4 nicest ones until now: The first one is very fragile and 1 cm long: The second shark tooth is about 2 cm long and I like the combination with a crinoid stem: Then this one is about 1.2 cm long and seems to be only a fragment. But I still like it And last but not least the find of the day: A 2.6 cm long shark tooth!! I will try to take better pictures of last and biggest shark tooth after cutting the stone a bit smaller. At the moment the tooth is on a huge stone! The prep work on the shark teeth was also very hard because the teeth are very fragile and the stone is very hard. I prepped it with different needles and with my air scribe I am very pleased with those finds I assume that all shark teeth are Sphenodus shark teeth. Thanks for watching! Hope you enjoyed
  5. 8 likes
    While visiting family in Georgia, I decided to take my older brother on a Cambrian Bug Hunt. There is no better place to go than a little exposure in Murray County, Georgia that lies under a bridge and next to the beautiful Conasauga River. The Upper Cambrian (Aphelaspis Zone) trilobites found here include Aphelaspis brachyphasis, and Agnostoids, among others. This is a relatively small exposure and depending on the height of the river, it can make the exposure that much smaller or not accessible at all. I was down her in May on my way back from Sanibel Island and I was not able to collect due to river conditions. The other thing that is small with this site is parking, if cars are parked correctly, you can fit 2, but no more that that. I also collect early and leave as much room as possible for any other collectors. Here are a couple pictures of the collecting area and the steep and often slippery descent. We were were only able to stay for two hours due to the fact that my brother got injured, but I will touch on that at the end. Here are some of my finds, I also collected matrix to work on later. Aphlelaspis brachyphasis Aphelaspis brachyphasis and a Agnostoid portion. Besides the mudstone, trilobites are also found in a harder grey shale. Here is a very large portion I found on the ground ( 35 pounds) and I will work on this piece at home. As you can see, there are trilobites found in it and many times they have excellent preservation. One handy tool to have there is this folding hacksaw, it allows me to trim pieces in the field for easier storage. As I stated above, my brother had an accident, really a slip and fall. Besides watching how you go up and down to your car, you have to watch the loose matrix. He went to adjust how he was sitting and the loose matrix caused him to slip. It appears he broke or dislocated his left pinky finger and we left so he could go to Urgent Care. Be careful collecting anywhere.
  6. 8 likes
    Hello TFF members, I got out for a very, very hot fossil hunting trip the other day and a managed to find a few small megalodon shark teeth, snaggletooth teeth, a three-toed horse tooth and bone and a bunch of other cool stuff. The only way I could bare the heat was to dip my shirt into the water and put it against my back in between every single screen. And if you don't want to watch the vid and/or can't see the thumbnail, here's a closeup of some of the highlights from the hunt: -Cris
  7. 8 likes
    I just got back from a week-long trip that included a stop to dig Green River fish at the American Fossil Quarry outside of Kemmerer, Wyoming. That was a successful venture and I will post a separate entry showing some of my finds once I get them unpacked. While I was there, I stopped in at the nearby Fossil Butte National Monument. In the visitor center, one of the rangers was doing a demo of prepping a Green River fish (a Diplomystus from the 18" layer they got from one of the commercial quarries). I didn't take any photos but I did ask a lot of questions. Before I share his answers, you might want to take a look at this video from the Fossil Butte National Monument website. It shows how they prep the fish using an air scribe and air abrasive. But be warned that what I learned isn't exactly the same as what is shown in the video here: https://www.nps.gov/media/video/view.htm?id=9BD712EE-1DD8-B71B-0B88EC525E86D328 The setup I saw was the same as in the video. It looked like a home-made blast cabinet with a sheet of acrylic plastic on top, held on by blue painters tape. It was connected to a good dust collector. The microscope, as in the video, looked like a Leica-Wild M8 stereomicroscope with a video camera on top and an offset binocular viewing head. This is a top-of-the-line unit that probably cost somewhere between $7,000 to $10,000 (sadly, this model microscope is no longer manufactured, but you can pick them up on the used market if you have enough money). The microscope seemed to be fixed in the center of the blast cabinet, you move the specimen around under it. I didn't learn the make of the air scribe tool he was using, he said it was a specially modified one with a large rubber sheath that reduced the vibration transmitted to his hands. For the air abrasive, they had two Crystal Mark Swam Blasters model EV-2. One of them, set off to the side and not being used, was labeled "Dolomite." I asked him what abrasive he was using and he said iron powder. I was surprised because I thought that would be much too hard on these fossils, but as I watched on the screen it did a great job of removing the matrix without damaging the fossil. I probed some more and he said that while the machine could be set to go up to 80 psi, he had it set to 13.3 psi. There is also a setting for powder flow that can be set between 1 and 10. He had it set to 6, and when he is doing delicate work on the fins, turns it down to 2 or 3. He also said the nozzle was specially modified to be smaller in diameter. I was pretty impressed with the quality of his work and am inspired to make my own blast cabinet similar to theirs (but without the high-priced microscope). I thought everyone might like to know what works for this facility even though it's different from what is usually recommended here on this forum.
  8. 7 likes
    Today I spent a few hours collecting at the Lawrenceburg, Indiana Road Cut. Here are a couple of finds- cephalopods, gastropods, brachiopods and trilo-bits.
  9. 7 likes
    I believe the large one is a Knightia alta, given the size of it's belly. Small one could be Knightia eocaena: This one is for @GeschWhat These are just a sampling of what we collected. Plenty of prep work left to do, which will keep me busy for awhile.
  10. 7 likes
    Mummified ice age wolf pup and caribou found in northern Canada The rare remains of an ice-age wolf pup and a caribou will offer insights about life in Canada's far north more than 50,000 years ago, scientists say. https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-45527525
  11. 7 likes
    Atlasaurus imelakei skeleton scanned and printed from the original . scale 1/10 at the panafrican congress of archeological association 2018 in rabat morocco.
  12. 7 likes
    Yes, there is! Here is the all-time classic lexicon: Brown, R.W. 1956 Composition of Scientific Words. Smithsonian Institution Press, 882 pp. LINK It is an indispensable go-to reference book on my library shelf. Roland Brown was also a brilliant paleobotanist and geologist.
  13. 6 likes
    Those are Vitis (grape) seeds. Neat find!
  14. 6 likes
    As the missus is at work, I couldn't secure a ride to kickboxing training, and I don't have any assignments to grade (yet), why waste a perfectly lovely morning? So out I hiked to the area just beyond my backyard to poke around in the spoil hills. As I've pretty much picked the place clean, my expectations were low enough that I didn't think I'd come away with anything - which was fine as I would be surrounded by the sights, sounds, and smells of nature. The spoils were laid down over a dozen years ago, and nothing all that new gets exposed over time; rather, sand and sticky mud that bakes hard covers more rock, or weeds and saplings extend their territory. I didn't come away with anything spectacular. Apart from a fragment of a very rare trilobite in these parts, this year has been a bit of a bust at this site. Mixed with construction debris are plenty of lower and middle Devonian limestones and sandstones, many of those that have no reliable bedding planes, or are just filled with tiny brachiopods, some bryozoa, bivalves, etc. There are virtually no trilobites left, apart from tiny fragments here and there. But I did find some ok stuff to take back with me. First up would be these relatively large brachs. I don't usually encounter big brachs in Devonian rocks:
  15. 6 likes
    Thanks but a long way from being an eggspert. Sorry for such a delay, life has been busy lately. I am very certain these are fakes, however, as pointed out fakes such as these can incredibly difficult to distinguish from real eggs. The reasons Seguidora listed do act as a solid test but must be used in combination with additional details which these lack. The particular two being listed I have seen other fakes of which are identical, and there are numerous copies circulating around. If listed as a cast or copy then perhaps it could be considered but just be aware, that is all you are getting. As I think was hinted at before, these have a history and were based off a real pair however that pair will not be ever sold.
  16. 6 likes
    Next piece of advice. Keep a pair of end nippers handy when hunting thinly laminated shales and limestones. You’ll have a much higher salvage rate with field trimming for the plane ride whether you are hunting Florissant, Kemmerer, U-Dig, Holzmaden or Solnhofen. Nipping results in much more controllable reduction than impact.
  17. 6 likes
    Do you guys want pictures of them in the cases, or close ups of the better ones?
  18. 6 likes
    Goodness Bobby, I had no idea you have been ill! I am so very sorry to hear of it. I work in the medical profession so I know how serious things can get very quickly. I am a praying woman. I will add you to my prayers. Best wishes for your rapid and complete recovery. Thank you Mrs. Rico for stepping in and giving us an update. Kim
  19. 6 likes
    Today was a Pleurodictyum coral day The largest specimen is 116mm x 96mm, the biggest I have ever found!! Finding one of these extra large Pleurodictyums in a day makes the trip. The pictures of the large Pleurodictyum with the smaller size Pleurodictyum displays the huge size difference between a normal sized Pleurodictyum (35mm x 21mm) and my GIANT. Thanks
  20. 6 likes
    It looks like a worn through shark grinding tooth, something like Psammodus. Here's one with a 2cm long break showing a similar texture.
  21. 6 likes
    It looks like a piece of a rudist.
  22. 5 likes
  23. 5 likes
    Next, a few Ectillaenus giganteus, pretty common in one of the site, more elusive in the other. Specimen shown here are pretty good for us. First of all, a nice rolled up one. to be continued...
  24. 5 likes
    A new echinoid for my collection, possibly Holectypus hondoensis, found on a random split. 1/2” either way and I would have missed it. Smaller than a dime. Only prep so far was a wet tooth brush.
  25. 5 likes
    OK now I’ll “leave” you with this.
  26. 5 likes
  27. 5 likes
    Thank all for the kind words they really makes me feel better . @Tidgy's Dad @Monica @ynot @KimTexan @Nimravis @Pagurus @Innocentx @JohnJ And @snolly50 liked the music very nice. speak to you all soon Bobby
  28. 5 likes
    My absolute best wishes for a salutary outcome. It will be a delight to welcome you back to this venue. In the meantime here is a tune to lift your spirit. It is not strictly jazz, but falls within the "Soul" genre. The original by Jr. Walker was a substantial hit and the tune became a staple among bands plying the "Beach Music" circuit of the Southeastern US. Jazzwise the original and this rendition showcase some wonderful "dirty" saxophone. As a special treat for me, the bearded sax player squeezing the alto and alto/tenor simultaneously is John Alexander. Years ago, I had the great pleasure of playing tenor in the band fronted by Alexander. I hope you will enjoy the tune and we will see you here very soon.
  29. 5 likes
    Someone posted this on a Texas group I am in. I thought it was cute. It fits well into the topic. I think you’d like it Bobby. Hope it makes you smile. Laughter is good medicine. Kim
  30. 5 likes
    Come back strong, Bobby. @Bobby Rico
  31. 5 likes
    We'll keep the lights on for you, Bobby. Rest up, get your strength back, and whenever you're ready we'll be here.
  32. 5 likes
    I am SOOOOOOOOOOOO excited! I just received my prize for best caption. I received these lovely original linocut prints from the Fabulous @Bobby Rico and his Mrs. I love them all, but must admit the coelacanth is my favorite. I can't wait to get them framed. Thank you so much Bobby!
  33. 5 likes
    I am tenativly planning on doing a display of fossils for our local rockhounding club come April and asked one of our budding forum artists ( Darko Milojkovic) to do a couple of renditions for me to display in the case along with their coinciding fossils. Darko was kind enough to do a trade of his artwork for some fossils. Unfortunately, the postal department somewhere between Serbia and California crumpled the envelope. These will go into pressed frames so hopefully shouldn't be too noticeable. We have a Mammoth, Wooly Rhinoceros, Ursus sp., Canis sp., Rhino, and a Ground Sloth.
  34. 5 likes
    The first specimen is a sea cucumber The second may be Hystriciola but it would be impossible to know for sure unless the jaws are well preserved. The third is an Essexella jellyfish Unfortunately, the idntification of the majority of Mazon animals that are posted on auction sites are incorrect. Hope that helps
  35. 5 likes
    Few more pics of the monster.
  36. 5 likes
    Try breaking up the names into their parts then search for the part. You know what dont is now look up hybo. For example; look up pluero then ceri. The dae ending means that it belongs to a family. You may have to read the original paper where the fossil was described to get the meaning or translation. Here is a good book by Williams: https://books.google.com/books?id=uiyTnq-tF0AC&pg=PA98&lpg=PA98&dq=hybo+humped&source=bl&ots=sVt3R0vwuU&sig=5iqCy7YtfyZMvcoppzs-xeebXgI&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjPst7Hu7TdAhWJ458KHZlmDCMQ6AEwCnoECAUQAQ#v=onepage&q=hybo humped&f=false
  37. 4 likes
    Much has been already said about Florissant, so I’ll be concise with my words. 34 MYA, lake environment, ash fall, pay dig. Controlled hunt: they dig and dump piles, you select chunks and split them at picnic tables. Not the death defying adventure I crave, but fun to do once, fill a Riker with common finds, and say I’ve been there. You can buy the same rock and have it shipped to you, but since we were in the area, I prefer the on-site experience and selecting my own rock from the piles. Hint: Skip the blocky and/or grainy stuff and target the thinly laminated, shaly stuff that is beginning to split on its own. If you see black organic matter, even better. Exploit those planes. A montage of pics follows.
  38. 4 likes
    In SC, we like our plastic crawfish with a little size to them.
  39. 4 likes
    Note! They are cutting their hours way back due to the end of the season. My wife and I drove almost 2 hours each way last week to go there only to find the gate locked and no one there. I advise getting the phone number off the website and calling before you go. Save yourself some gas and disappointment. We've been there before and found lots of great leaves and insects. Highly recommended.
  40. 4 likes
    This is a clearer picture of a couple Rhabdoderma scales.
  41. 4 likes
    Yesterday when i was walking back from an unsuccessful collecting tip i spotted this beauty laying half buried on a beach near Whitby! Before this point i'd only found one icthyosaur vert, and it was very worn, and half broken. So i'm extremely happy with the preservation on this one!
  42. 4 likes
    Just arrived. An Ectillaenus giganteus from the Valongo Fm. Almost exactly 7 cm, and purchased very cheaply for a fairly well preserved specimen. These are relatively common, but certainly fills a species hole in my trilobite collection.
  43. 4 likes
    Razanandrongobe sakalavae Ambondromamy Found in the Isalo III B Rock unit, Mahajanga Basin, North West Madagascar Middle Jurassic (Bathonian) I have had this tooth for a while now but I have been on vacation so I haven't had the time to post pictures of it. Restored tip but a really nice thick rare croc tooth. You can also make out the large serrations. Incredible tooth. Below is a picture of the croc tooth sitting next to other large teeth in my collection.
  44. 4 likes
  45. 4 likes
    And I would also like to show you some big eggs from Ganzhou for comparison. These are genuine eggs just dug up from the digging site. The size is about the same as the Henan ones but the shell and its ornamentation are totally different.
  46. 4 likes
    Been a few years but I am still about. Ask people who collect The Barton formation what they wish to find and the answers is usually Hippochrenes amplus (Solander in Brander, 1766) the Stromboidea Family of Gastrodods. http://www.stromboidea.de/?n=Species.HippochrenesAmplus http://eol.org/pages/4873104/details Over the years I've been looking to that perfect example. it's a large target and very fragile. The first example found was a memorable experience many people on the beach looking but I was lucky to observe a small part which was exposed. for many years this was my best example another Back in 2012 I noticed some potential in the was rewarded in December with what I had been seeking for a good few years. Estatic was an understatement. This shows you why it's so difficult to find a good example.
  47. 4 likes
    Careful when you make assumptions without knowing a whole lot about Latin and Latinized Greek. Many of the base words change drastically when merged together into the final form. While "ceras" may mean wax in Latin, "keras" is Ancient Greek for "horn/projection" which can be Latinized as "ceras" (lest we forget everybody's favorite Triceratops "three-horned-face"). I'm curious as to why you are interested into the etymology Pleuroceridae as a google search seems to be a family of freshwater snails based on the genus Pleurocera. I would presume you are more interested in the fossil ammonite genus Pleuroceras which seems to be in the family Amaltheidae (more than I knew personally without researching on the internet). This genus was named by Hyatt back in 1868 which makes research into the underlying naming rather difficult as it is usually near impossible to dig up the original description online. Back in the day they often had rather skimpy (by today's standards) descriptions of species and often did not include the reasoning behind coining a new genus name. Either it was just "understood" at a time when the other learned readers of the day also were well versed in Latin and Greek or they were lazy and just didn't think the reader needed to know the etymology. These days most scientific papers introducing new species tend to have an "Etymology" section where the reasoning behind the new name is expressly stated so there is no confusion later. In addition to "pleuro" having the definition "side/lateral" it is also used for the meaning "rib". Looking at this genus of ammonites it appears that one of the distinctive features are the strong ribs in the shell along the sides. It is entirely possible that "Pleuroceras" refers to those ribs projecting out. The original description by Hyatt back in 1868 seems to have been printed in Harvard's Bulletin of the Museum of Comparative Zoology. If you had the desire and means to pursue this you could either look for this original publication (online or in person in a large research library). Other options would be to hope for publications like this one which likely includes the original description of this genus (Yorkshire Type Ammonites): https://books.google.com/books?id=5Pk1rgEACAAJ&dq=Yorkshire+Type+Ammonites&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwibjMz-2bXdAhUStlkKHYbfDxIQ6AEIJzAA The point of all this is to say that while books on Latin and Greek terms used in scientific names are very useful to gain a better understanding on these sometimes impenetrable words, they need to be used with care and caution. Creating a label for your Pleuroceras ammonite with the common name translation "waxy sided ammonite" may cause some embarrassment if one day you are visited by someone with greater knowledge who wonders about the meaning of the label when genus may possibly translate to something totally different like "ammonite with projecting ribs". I've been an editor for marine life field guide books that friends of mine publish. Often we'd picture a species that had no common name in current use and we'd have to coin a common name for the creature (an obscure fish or marine invertebrate). I'd look into the translation of the species name to see if there was any help in identifying the distinctive feature that the scientist used in giving it it's official name. It was sometimes possible that a species named "rubropunctata" might very well be a fine "Red Spotted" something or another. Other times the specific name referred to such a subtle characteristic that it was useless as a foundation for an acceptable common name for a field guide. Caution is always advised when digging into the reasoning behind why someone chose to construct a particular Latinized scientific name. Cheers. -Ken
  48. 4 likes
    I've cropped and brightened the pictures:
  49. 4 likes
    This happened in the 1940s, actually, but wasn't heavily enforced until the 90s, and wasn't enforced via interpol until the last few years. However, the vast majority of Brazilian fossil material found outside of Brazil was exported illegally.
  50. 4 likes
    Hi Pirahna, I agree. Mesosaurus specimens were a common sight at mineral and fossil shows back in the 80's and into the 90's. They were all from the Early Permian of Brazil (though specimens are known from other parts of South America and South Africa - a fact used as evidence of continental drift during the early 20th century). Several years ago, Brazil outlawed the export of fossils so all you see now are specimens from old collections. This specimen is typical of what we used to see - most of a skeleton but often missing the skull other than an imprint of it. Some of the skull might have been there (lost during collection and initial preparation) but it looks more like it could have been eroded away before it was found. There were some great specimens that still had the skull and just about all the bones. Sometimes, nearly all the bones were there but the final burial of the animal left one of the limbs folded underneath the body - tough to prep out cleanly so that part of the skeleton was left as-is. Jess
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