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Found 126 results

  1. This peculiar looking tooth is a parasymphyseal benedeni from Antwerp, Belgium. This little tooth is one of my favourite personal finds and is also one of the rarer pieces in my collection.
  2. 9672607F-D10D-4E51-B7D6-A5D9165C8717.jpeg

    From the album Shark teeth and associated fossils from Antwerp, Belgium

    One of the rarer teeth in my personal collection. This is a parasymphyseal Parotodus Benedeni. I knew I struck gold when I pocket this one out of my sifter Found in Antwerp, Belgium

    © Graulus Charlotte

  3. Antwerp sharkteeth

    Here are some others recent finds from the Begian Antwerp area. Since I can’t make a gallery yet I’m going to show of some pictures over here I really love the colours on these...
  4. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    FOSSIL STEM CALAMITES SITE LOCATION: Westphalian deposits in the area around Mons in Belgium TIME PERIOD: Carboniferous (311-315 Million Years Ago) Data: Calamites is a genus of extinct arborescent (tree-like) horsetails to which the modern horsetails (genus Equisetum) are closely related. Unlike their herbaceous modern cousins, these plants were medium-sized trees, growing to heights of more than 30 meters (100 feet). They were components of the understories of coal swamps of the Carboniferous Period (around 360 to 300 million years ago). A number of organ taxa have been identified as part of a united organism, which has inherited the name Calamites in popular culture. Calamites correctly refers only to casts of the stem of Carboniferous/Permian sphenophytes, and as such is a form genus of little taxonomic value. There are two forms of casts, which can give mistaken impressions of the organisms. The most common is an internal cast of the hollow (or pith-filled) void in the centre of the trunk. This can cause some confusion: firstly, it must be remembered that a fossil was probably surrounded with 4-5 times its width in (unpreserved) vascular tissue, so the organisms were much wider than the internal casts preserved. Further, the fossil gets narrower as it attaches to a rhizoid, a place where one would expect there to be the highest concentration of vascular tissue (as this is where the peak transport occurs). However, because the fossil is a cast, the narrowing in fact represents a constriction of the cavity, into which vascular tubes encroach as they widen. The trunks of Calamites had a distinctive segmented, bamboo-like appearance and vertical ribbing. The branches, leaves and cones were all borne in whorls. The leaves were needle-shaped, with up to 25 per whorl. Their trunks produced secondary xylem, meaning they were made of wood. The vascular cambium of Calamites was unifacial, producing secondary xylem towards the stem center, but not secondary phloem. The stems of modern horsetails are typically hollow or contain numerous elongated air-filled sacs. Calamites was similar in that its trunk and stems were hollow, like wooden tubes. When these trunks buckled and broke, they could fill with sediment. This is the reason pith casts of the inside of Calamites stems are so common as fossils. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophyta Class: Equisetopsida Order: Equisetales Family: †Calamitaceae Genus: †Calamites
  5. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    FOSSIL STEM CALAMITES SITE LOCATION: Westphalian deposits in the area around Mons in Belgium TIME PERIOD: Carboniferous (311-315 Million Years Ago) Data: Calamites is a genus of extinct arborescent (tree-like) horsetails to which the modern horsetails (genus Equisetum) are closely related. Unlike their herbaceous modern cousins, these plants were medium-sized trees, growing to heights of more than 30 meters (100 feet). They were components of the understories of coal swamps of the Carboniferous Period (around 360 to 300 million years ago). A number of organ taxa have been identified as part of a united organism, which has inherited the name Calamites in popular culture. Calamites correctly refers only to casts of the stem of Carboniferous/Permian sphenophytes, and as such is a form genus of little taxonomic value. There are two forms of casts, which can give mistaken impressions of the organisms. The most common is an internal cast of the hollow (or pith-filled) void in the centre of the trunk. This can cause some confusion: firstly, it must be remembered that a fossil was probably surrounded with 4-5 times its width in (unpreserved) vascular tissue, so the organisms were much wider than the internal casts preserved. Further, the fossil gets narrower as it attaches to a rhizoid, a place where one would expect there to be the highest concentration of vascular tissue (as this is where the peak transport occurs). However, because the fossil is a cast, the narrowing in fact represents a constriction of the cavity, into which vascular tubes encroach as they widen. The trunks of Calamites had a distinctive segmented, bamboo-like appearance and vertical ribbing. The branches, leaves and cones were all borne in whorls. The leaves were needle-shaped, with up to 25 per whorl. Their trunks produced secondary xylem, meaning they were made of wood. The vascular cambium of Calamites was unifacial, producing secondary xylem towards the stem center, but not secondary phloem. The stems of modern horsetails are typically hollow or contain numerous elongated air-filled sacs. Calamites was similar in that its trunk and stems were hollow, like wooden tubes. When these trunks buckled and broke, they could fill with sediment. This is the reason pith casts of the inside of Calamites stems are so common as fossils. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophyta Class: Equisetopsida Order: Equisetales Family: †Calamitaceae Genus: †Calamites
  6. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    FOSSIL STEM CALAMITES SITE LOCATION: Westphalian deposits in the area around Mons in Belgium TIME PERIOD: Carboniferous (311-315 Million Years Ago) Data: Calamites is a genus of extinct arborescent (tree-like) horsetails to which the modern horsetails (genus Equisetum) are closely related. Unlike their herbaceous modern cousins, these plants were medium-sized trees, growing to heights of more than 30 meters (100 feet). They were components of the understories of coal swamps of the Carboniferous Period (around 360 to 300 million years ago). A number of organ taxa have been identified as part of a united organism, which has inherited the name Calamites in popular culture. Calamites correctly refers only to casts of the stem of Carboniferous/Permian sphenophytes, and as such is a form genus of little taxonomic value. There are two forms of casts, which can give mistaken impressions of the organisms. The most common is an internal cast of the hollow (or pith-filled) void in the centre of the trunk. This can cause some confusion: firstly, it must be remembered that a fossil was probably surrounded with 4-5 times its width in (unpreserved) vascular tissue, so the organisms were much wider than the internal casts preserved. Further, the fossil gets narrower as it attaches to a rhizoid, a place where one would expect there to be the highest concentration of vascular tissue (as this is where the peak transport occurs). However, because the fossil is a cast, the narrowing in fact represents a constriction of the cavity, into which vascular tubes encroach as they widen. The trunks of Calamites had a distinctive segmented, bamboo-like appearance and vertical ribbing. The branches, leaves and cones were all borne in whorls. The leaves were needle-shaped, with up to 25 per whorl. Their trunks produced secondary xylem, meaning they were made of wood. The vascular cambium of Calamites was unifacial, producing secondary xylem towards the stem center, but not secondary phloem. The stems of modern horsetails are typically hollow or contain numerous elongated air-filled sacs. Calamites was similar in that its trunk and stems were hollow, like wooden tubes. When these trunks buckled and broke, they could fill with sediment. This is the reason pith casts of the inside of Calamites stems are so common as fossils. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophyta Class: Equisetopsida Order: Equisetales Family: †Calamitaceae Genus: †Calamites
  7. Rare find, Antwerp, Belgium

    Went out to hunt for sharkteeth today but due to the poor weather and trafic I lost a lot of time, so hardly any finds... Since I’m new to the forum I think however it would be nice to post a recent find. This is a piece of jawebone from a delphinodon dividum... it might be the only piece like this ever to be found in Antwerp. So pretty rare Kind regards Charlotte
  8. Hunting Antwerp, Belgium

    Hello everyone, Here are some recent finds from Antwerp, Belgium. Going back tomorrow so wish me luck
  9. Gray shark tooth

    A tiny tooth of an Abdounia minutissima. Bought from an old collection. The site at which it was collected, the Egem quarry, is now unfortunately closed. (Thanks to @darktheumbreon for finding the family!)
  10. A bunch of different Glycymeris

    Hi all, So, here are a bunch of fossil bittersweet clams (Glycymeris) from different locations. So far they are all labeled as "Glycymeris" (which I'm pretty sure is correct). But I would really like to put a species name on each of them. Therefore I am reaching out to you all, because hopefully you will be able to help me sort this out! 1) Glycymeris from Westerschelde, Netherlands; from the late Pliocene (2.5 million years old). I'm thinking G. radiolyrata, but I'm not sure... 2) Glycymeris from Westerschelde, Netherlands; from the late Pliocene (2.5 million years old). G. obovata maybe? Or G. variabilis???
  11. Hi all, I have been having trouble finding a good guide to use in order to ID fossil seashells (mainly gastropods and bivalves) of the Neogene-Quaternary of Western Europe (mainly Belgium/Netherlands). So, I'm turning to you guys: does anyone of you have a nice up-to-date website/online paper that I could use in order to help me ID all of my different seashells? Preferable with clear photos/drawings of the different species. Thanks in advance! Max
  12. Weathered crystallised goniatites

    I promised some regular posts from my collection in the weeks to come, so for this week I got two particular goniatites I like to share. Both specimens are weathered, but reveal some beautiful crystalisation of the chambers. Especialy the large one where they even form small calcite geodes. 1st specimen: Manticoceras sp. Frasnian Chimay area ( Belgium ) 2nd specimen: Sphaeromanticoceras sp. Frasnian Chimay area ( Belgium )
  13. Lucky split

    Most of the times when you find a promising specimen there is always that challenge of getting it unscathed out of the matrix. And often resulting in a lot of cursing and a damaged specimen. But sometimes, on very .. very … rare occasions you do get that lucky split. Found this Manticoceras ( goniatite ) last summer. One good hit with the chisel and pop. Only minimal prepwork left. This one is by far one of my best specimens and made it to my new avatar Manticoceras sp. Frasnian ( Devonian ) Chimay area ( Belgium ) https://photos.app.goo.gl/5rcHesN212VPDnzq2 Greetings, Manticocerasman
  14. A little spot of heaven

    Hi all, This Saturday was a long awaited day. It was meant to already happen 3 weekends earlier, but due to many different annoying factors (bad weather, last-minute activities, etc) we only got to do it later... Luckily this gave me some more time to finish buidling my homemade sifter: When a good day finally opened up for the hunt, we got all the equipment ready and packed the car. We then set off to our 1 1/2 hour road trip from The Hague till our final destination: a pit in the region of Antwerp, Belgium (*). We stopped after an hour of car ride in the village of Stabroek, in the north of Flanders. We went to this cute little restaurant called "Taverne de Neus" (translation: "Tavern the Nose", curious name). There we ate the real Belgian meal: garnalenkroket (search it up) with fries (this is, contrary to popular belief, a Belgian invention, and NOT French!). After having a full belly for the fossil hunting, we went back on the road and arrived at our final destination. We parked our car, and just as we arrived, a young man (who works at the Natuurhistorisch Museum Rotterdam) and his mother were leaving the area. They told us that up in the pit there was a lovely couple searching there, and that they would be able to give us many tips for on our first hunt here. So we went there, and met them. Very generous, they told us exactly how to find what, and thanks to them we quickly found fossils on our own too! Shortly after a very nice French-speaking family, with two kids of about 6 and 8, arrived at the location too. It was only their second time here, and they too were happy to receive some advice from the more experienced couple. We had some great fossil-related talks all together, and I think we all learnt a lot from one another. Now back to the actual hunt: in the sand, it was easy to find many nice fossil seashells and some whale bone pieces, and with a bit of luck some small broken shark teeth. But the "real stuff" was found by sifting the thick dark-grey sand underneath the grass. We had to first dig a hole in the grass, until we encountered a harder and "crunchier" layer of sand. We had to take some of this, put it in the sifter and then shake. And Tadaa! Beautiful shark teeth! The thing was, our sifter was a hand-sifter. Therefore it takes up a lot more energy to sift, and it is done less efficiently. The couple that were there had a much more useful system: a sifter with a foot. It had a long foot underneath, stuck in the ground, which made shaking a lot easier, as the weight of the sifter didn't have to be carried. Also, as they could therefore afford a heavier sifter, they put two screens on each other. The first one only for bigger fossils, the second one to also keep the smaller ones. This made their job a lot easier. My sifter still worked just fine, and for a first one I think it's pretty decent! The couple, which were also very generous, were kind enough to give us some nice shark teeth too, in order to slightly broaden our haul. Here is the total haul: guess I can't complain for a first time!!! On the far right, whale bone pieces. The three small black things under them are bivalve and gastropod steinkerns. Beneath those (middle-right) you have two concretions with scallops. Then all along the left side you have fossil seashells. Species include: Glycymeris, Laevastarte, Astarte, Natica, Cardites, Cyclocardia, Turitella, Nassarius, etc. Those shells are likely from the Pliocene. And finally, the things that might have caught your eye the most: shark teeth! Species include: Carcharodon, Carcharhinus, Isurus, Carcharoides, Notorhynchus, etc. Those shark teeth are usually from the Miocene-Pliocene, but some are from the Eocene. Here are the teeth that I got from the couple (so not personal finds; still very happy to have them!): And here what are, in my opinion, the best personal finds: Necklace shell (Natica sp. ?)
  15. Belgian shark tooth

    Hi all, Here a shark tooth from Balegem, Belgium. From the Lede Sand formation. From the Lutetian stage of the Eocene (45 mya). I'm thinking Lamna nasus, but I'm not sure... Anyone know the species? Thanks in advance, Max
  16. Shark/fish tooth ID

    Hi all, Found this little tooth hiding in between my pycndont fish teeth from Balegem. I quickly realized that this wasn't in the right place, and it reminded me of something else. So, is it maybe a very worn Nebrius thielensi? Or is it something else? It's from Balegem, Belgium (closed location). From the Lede Sand Formation. From the Lutetian stage of the Eocene (45 mya). Thanks in advance! Max
  17. Last year Kevin H. gave me some information about a good location for fossils near Barvaux (Thanks @Kevin H. ) Its a construction site where you can find many devonian fossils. The most common fossils are brachiopods but you can also find corals and gastropods ! Too bad that it seems that they not work there anymore ... despite of that you can still find many brachiopods. Firstly some pictures of the site: And there they are ! Its a pity that they are often damaged ! I spent there about 3 hours and found more than 300 brachiopods ! I think more or less all are Cyrtospirifer verneuili ... And here are the biggest ones: The biggest one is about 8 cm long and very massive. Its difficult to find such big ones in a good condition ! This one is a very nice one becuase of the good preservation. Its about 4.5 cm long. Some more brachiopods from other angles: + These three brachiopods look a bit different ... can somebody determine them? I found also some brachiopods where you can see the spiral shaped lophophores ("skeleton") of them... I can post brachiopods the whole day But I also found some corals
  18. What is this?

    Last week i enjoyed my holiday in Belgium in the Ardennes. Too bad that the weather was sometimes not that good but all in all it was a nice and successful holiday. I spent one complete day in an old quarry near Resteigne, where you can find many different fossils. The layers belong to the Eifelium, Middle Devon. For example I found brachiopods, corals and some trilobite parts. I will post them in a few days. But I also found an interesting item which I cant identify ! Its about 2 cm long and in my eyes it looks strange Maybe a kind of crinoid?? Any help is welcome ! Thanks !
  19. Tiger shark (?) from Balegem

    Hi all, Is this a tiger shark? If so, from what species? For now I'm thinking Galeocerdo latidens, but I'm not sure... It's from Balegem, Belgium (--> Lutetian, Eocene; 45 mya). Thanks in advance, Max
  20. Mako (?) from Balegem

    Hi all, Is this a mako? In my opinion it looks a little bit like Isurus oxirhynchus, but I'm not sure. I know that it's quite worn, but still IDable. It comes from Balegem, Belgium (--> Lutetian, Eocene; 45 mya). Thanks for the help, Max Closeups side 1:
  21. Sharktooth from Balegem

    Hi all, Here another sharktooth, from Balegem, Belgium. From the Lutetian stage of the early Eocene (approx 45 mya). What's the species? Have a nice weekend, Max Closeups side 1:
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