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Found 378 results

  1. This interesting specimen of Keichousaurus was just dug up from Xingyi of Guizhou. Look, it got two heads! I think the other head belongs to another Keichousaurus with body still buried in the matrix or it is the left over skull of another individual. What do you think?
  2. A very large Moroccan centrum is being offered for sale. Seller identifies it as a Carcharodontosaurus. In my opinion this looks more like a Sauropod with that very large pleurocoel in the lateral view. Not sure what is going on with that purplish looking material if its been added. Spinosaurus tail, caudal vertebra being offered for sale no mention of any repairs. The centrum does look like its from a Spinosaurid but the processes look composited. You can see the typical Moroccan matrix mix between those processss and centrum. Seller is advertising this as a Carcharodontosaurus toe bone. Identifying isolated toe bones to a species in the Kem Kem is very difficult not much is published that describes them. Its a nice bone buy it as an indeterminate Theropod. Lots of eggs are showing up for sale. Most are fake....this is just a reminder of that, please post interests here before you buy. I still see some dealers offering Rugops teeth for sale from the Kem Kem. Just a reminder that this species is only described from the Echkar Fm of Niger. Most of the teeth offered are Abelisaurid but are indeterminate from the Kem Kem until something is published. For fun saw this 4 figure listing, seller describes it as a petrified baby dinosaur skull with teeth, skin and brain matter coming out of the side of its mouth looks like an alien head to me.
  3. Insect ID

    Hello all I received this insect in a trade with another forum member a couple of months ago. All other insects I could ID, but I can't find this one. It is from the Yixian Fm. of Liaoning, China. This formation is early Cretaceous. I finally got a new camera. The pictures are not perfect but I hope they do the job. Insect is a little over 1 cm. Greetings
  4. Fish from Guizhou

    This fish is 13cm, just dug up from Xingyi of Guizhou, China. Any idea what species is it?
  5. The amazing dragon from China

    https://www.newsweek.com/amazing-dragon-lingwu-new-50-foot-long-dinosaur-species-found-china-1039811
  6. found this on "the auction site"
  7. Reptile fossil from Liaoning

    This is from Liaoning, China. It is small, and looks like a lizard. Any idea what is that?
  8. Guizhou Fish

    This small fish is from Xingyi, Guizhou Province of China. Any idea what species it is? @oilshale
  9. SEGNOSAUR EGG

    Hello, I am hoping someone can help me. I have SEGNOSAUR EGGS. Its 3 eggs together. I was hoping someone could look at them at tell me what you think.
  10. Is this specimen of Hyphalosaurus lingyuanensis genuine? It is from Liaoning, China.
  11. Sus scrofa tooth 1.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Sus scrofa tooth China Pleistocene Period (150,000 - 50,000 years) The wild boar (Sus scrofa), also known as the wild swine, Eurasian wild pig, or simply wild pig, is a suid native to much of Eurasia, North Africa, and the Greater Sunda Islands. Human intervention has spread its distribution further, making the species one of the widest-ranging mammals in the world, as well as the most widely spread suiform. Its wide range, high numbers, and adaptability mean that it is classed as least concern by the IUCN and it has become an invasive species in part of its introduced range. The animal probably originated in Southeast Asia during the Early Pleistocene, and outcompeted other suid species as it spread throughout the Old World. As of 1990, up to 16 subspecies are recognized, which are divided into four regional groupings based on skull height and lacrimal bone length. The species lives in matriarchal societies consisting of interrelated females and their young (both male and female). Fully grown males are usually solitary outside the breeding season. The grey wolf is the wild boar's main predator throughout most of its range except in the Far East and the Lesser Sunda Islands, where it is replaced by the tiger and Komodo dragon, respectively. It has a long history of association with humans, having been the ancestor of most domestic pig breeds and a big-game animal for millennia. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Mammalia Order: Artiodactyla Clade: Artiofabula Suborder: Suina Family: Suidae Subfamily: Suinae Genus: Sus Species: scrofa
  12. Sus scrofa tooth 1.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Sus scrofa tooth China Pleistocene Period (150,000 - 50,000 years) The wild boar (Sus scrofa), also known as the wild swine, Eurasian wild pig, or simply wild pig, is a suid native to much of Eurasia, North Africa, and the Greater Sunda Islands. Human intervention has spread its distribution further, making the species one of the widest-ranging mammals in the world, as well as the most widely spread suiform. Its wide range, high numbers, and adaptability mean that it is classed as least concern by the IUCN and it has become an invasive species in part of its introduced range. The animal probably originated in Southeast Asia during the Early Pleistocene, and outcompeted other suid species as it spread throughout the Old World. As of 1990, up to 16 subspecies are recognized, which are divided into four regional groupings based on skull height and lacrimal bone length. The species lives in matriarchal societies consisting of interrelated females and their young (both male and female). Fully grown males are usually solitary outside the breeding season. The grey wolf is the wild boar's main predator throughout most of its range except in the Far East and the Lesser Sunda Islands, where it is replaced by the tiger and Komodo dragon, respectively. It has a long history of association with humans, having been the ancestor of most domestic pig breeds and a big-game animal for millennia. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Mammalia Order: Artiodactyla Clade: Artiofabula Suborder: Suina Family: Suidae Subfamily: Suinae Genus: Sus Species: scrofa
  13. Sus scrofa tooth 1.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Sus scrofa tooth China Pleistocene Period (150,000 - 50,000 years) The wild boar (Sus scrofa), also known as the wild swine, Eurasian wild pig, or simply wild pig, is a suid native to much of Eurasia, North Africa, and the Greater Sunda Islands. Human intervention has spread its distribution further, making the species one of the widest-ranging mammals in the world, as well as the most widely spread suiform. Its wide range, high numbers, and adaptability mean that it is classed as least concern by the IUCN and it has become an invasive species in part of its introduced range. The animal probably originated in Southeast Asia during the Early Pleistocene, and outcompeted other suid species as it spread throughout the Old World. As of 1990, up to 16 subspecies are recognized, which are divided into four regional groupings based on skull height and lacrimal bone length. The species lives in matriarchal societies consisting of interrelated females and their young (both male and female). Fully grown males are usually solitary outside the breeding season. The grey wolf is the wild boar's main predator throughout most of its range except in the Far East and the Lesser Sunda Islands, where it is replaced by the tiger and Komodo dragon, respectively. It has a long history of association with humans, having been the ancestor of most domestic pig breeds and a big-game animal for millennia. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Mammalia Order: Artiodactyla Clade: Artiofabula Suborder: Suina Family: Suidae Subfamily: Suinae Genus: Sus Species: scrofa
  14. Sus scrofa tooth 1.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Sus scrofa tooth China Pleistocene Period (150,000 - 50,000 years) The wild boar (Sus scrofa), also known as the wild swine, Eurasian wild pig, or simply wild pig, is a suid native to much of Eurasia, North Africa, and the Greater Sunda Islands. Human intervention has spread its distribution further, making the species one of the widest-ranging mammals in the world, as well as the most widely spread suiform. Its wide range, high numbers, and adaptability mean that it is classed as least concern by the IUCN and it has become an invasive species in part of its introduced range. The animal probably originated in Southeast Asia during the Early Pleistocene, and outcompeted other suid species as it spread throughout the Old World. As of 1990, up to 16 subspecies are recognized, which are divided into four regional groupings based on skull height and lacrimal bone length. The species lives in matriarchal societies consisting of interrelated females and their young (both male and female). Fully grown males are usually solitary outside the breeding season. The grey wolf is the wild boar's main predator throughout most of its range except in the Far East and the Lesser Sunda Islands, where it is replaced by the tiger and Komodo dragon, respectively. It has a long history of association with humans, having been the ancestor of most domestic pig breeds and a big-game animal for millennia. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Mammalia Order: Artiodactyla Clade: Artiofabula Suborder: Suina Family: Suidae Subfamily: Suinae Genus: Sus Species: scrofa
  15. During my fossil hunt at the local emporium, I came across this specimen. It was labeled Fossil Pig Tooth, China. What kind of pig do you think? A boar? A pig like today? Any idea on period? Pleistocene? I like teeth - but this is a new one for me!
  16. https://arstechnica.com/science/2018/06/extinct-gibbon-in-ancient-chinese-tomb-hints-at-other-lost-primate-species/ https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-06/aaft-tla062118.php https://mashable.com/2018/06/21/gibbon-tomb-extinction-by-humans/?europe=true#4hWwQ67EMaqU
  17. http://www.techtimes.com/articles/230575/20180619/22-000-year-old-jaw-fossil-reveals-ancient-breed-of-giant-panda.htm
  18. https://gbtimes.com/jurassic-period-snake-necked-turtle-fossil-found-in-sw-china
  19. These Are the Oldest Known Footprints on the Planet By George Dvorsky, Gizmodo, June 7, 2018 https://gizmodo.com/these-are-the-oldest-known-footprints-on-the-planet-1826648702 When did animals leave their first footprint on Earth? Chinese Academy of Sciences, June 6, 2018, Press Release https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-06/caos-wda060518.php The paper is: Zhe Chen, Xiang Chen, Chuanming Zhou, Xunlai Yuan, and Shuhai Xiao, 2018, Late Ediacaran trackways produced by bilaterian animals with paired appendages Science Advances 06 Jun 2018: Vol. 4, no. 6, eaao6691 DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aao6691 http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/4/6/eaao6691 Yours, Paul H.
  20. Large and reasonably old

    VERY HIGHLY ,nay,UNRESERVEDLY recommended,3,2 Mb This is for all those who are interestested (almost said "this is dedicated to all those interested" in the earliest history of (multicellular) animals!!!!!!!!!! in Earths earliest biota... myanknollszieparamNaturellular_eukaryotes_from_the_.pdf Give it a go, because Zhu and Knoll do know their paleobiology. I would NOT be far wrong in saying that now that Martin Brasier is no longer with us, Knoll is one of the biggest names in "early earth/astrobiology".
  21. https://www.haaretz.com/science-and-health/MAGAZINE-tiny-babies-of-prehistoric-giant-shrimp-were-ferocious-killers-too-1.6150981
  22. Are these two specimens of Manchurochelys genuine? They are from Liaoning, China.
  23. In May, I took a trip to China to attend my brother's wedding. Of course, I couldn't miss the world famous Zigong Dinosaur Museum. This museum was built in 1987, and is the first museum based entirely on Asian dinosaurs. Allow me to share my journey with you. Entrance to the museum: Within the grand hall: My mom standing next to the Mamenchisaurus and Datousaurus for scale:
  24. STEGOPDON BONE 0.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Stegodon Bone China Pleistocene age (2,588,000 to 11,700 years ago) Stegodon (meaning "roofed tooth" from the Greek words stegein 'to cover' and odous 'tooth', because of the distinctive ridges on the animal's molars) is a genus of the extinct subfamily Stegodontinae of the order Proboscidea. It was assigned to the family Elephantidae (Abel, 1919), but has also been placed in Stegodontidae (R. L. Carroll, 1988). Stegodonts were present from 11.6 mya to late Pleistocene, with unconfirmed records of regional survival until 4,100 years ago. Fossils are found in Asian and African strata dating from the late Miocene. They lived in large parts of Asia, East and Central Africa during the Pleistocene. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Mammalia Order: Proboscidea Family: †Stegodontidae Genus: †Stegodon
  25. STEGOPDON BONE 0.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Stegodon Bone China Pleistocene age (2,588,000 to 11,700 years ago) Stegodon (meaning "roofed tooth" from the Greek words stegein 'to cover' and odous 'tooth', because of the distinctive ridges on the animal's molars) is a genus of the extinct subfamily Stegodontinae of the order Proboscidea. It was assigned to the family Elephantidae (Abel, 1919), but has also been placed in Stegodontidae (R. L. Carroll, 1988). Stegodonts were present from 11.6 mya to late Pleistocene, with unconfirmed records of regional survival until 4,100 years ago. Fossils are found in Asian and African strata dating from the late Miocene. They lived in large parts of Asia, East and Central Africa during the Pleistocene. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Mammalia Order: Proboscidea Family: †Stegodontidae Genus: †Stegodon
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