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Found 190 results

  1. Hi, Was wondering if this is a caudal vertebra from Megalosaurus? it is from Oxfordshire, England which is consistent with where Megalosaurus remains have been found but i am not sure of what diagnostic features separate Megalosaurus fossils from other dinosaurs and if there are enough diagnostic features on the bone in question. It is 6.7cm in length (2.65 inch). Thanks.
  2. Iguanodon Vertebra?

    Along with the Daspletosaurus and Alberta fossils I have been looking at in trying to get. I’ve have also been looking at some European Dinosaur fossils to get. I have found this and am wondering if it’s a IGUANODON vertebra?, or another animal? It’s from the Isle of Wight, England. Thank you!!
  3. Freebie ID

    I received these 3 items as a freebie together with another purchase I made. Seller does not know what they are And only collection info is Kent, England. He does not know the exact location Largest is 1 cm Any ideas??
  4. Storm Dennis Megs

    Got up nice and early to beat any other fossil enthusiasts who may be heading to the beach. However due to storm Dennis hitting the UK I didn’t need to as it was raining cats and dogs and rather windy! Anyway, got down to the red crag cliffs that have taken a hammering in the strong winds we have been having the past month. Within the first ten minutes found a heart brake half Meg, shame cause it was 94mm long. Found a smaller 59mm well polished Meg about ten yards away and thought I was going to be in for a Meg tooth filled day! However that was not the case, only other decent find was a nice 61mm Otodus. Few more small Isurus teeth and other bits n bobs but nothing amazing. I did spend an hour looking for the other half of the first Meg but to no avail.... (Apologies about the sideways images and any neck injuries that may occur whilst looking at them) Thanks for reading everyone!
  5. I’m sat inside right now waiting for the right time to go down to Charmouth and Lyme after storm Ciara and apparently there’s going to be another storm this week called storm Dennis. Is anyone else waiting for the storms to create some cliff falls and bring down some goodies ? There’s bound to be something in this mass of storms. Also, if you’ve been out straight after Ciara and found some goodies, then i’d love it if you could show us .
  6. A few of my ammonites collected from the Inferior Oolite at both coastal and inland quarry sites in Dorset, UK.
  7. Insect ID request

    Can anyone tell me which insect this is? It's Jurassic, Charmouth, Dorset, England. 1.5"
  8. Another English Meg!

    Good evening everyone! Quickly headed out to the local beach after work before storm Brendan hit, few little teeth before this caught my eye. 81mm and very worn, typical English Meg. Also found what I think is a partial crocodile scute from the London clay beds? If so it’s a first for me! Thanks all!
  9. Dinosaur Bone from the Isle of Wight, UK

    A recent find from the stretch of beach between Chilton Chine and Grange Chine on the Isle of Wight, England. It is from the Wessex Formation, about 130 million years old (Early Cretaceous). The bone is quite rolled by the sea but there are still some features remaining and so i was hoping it could still be identified, at least perhaps the type of bone that it is (either the end of some kind of long bone or a metapodial. Length= 4.4 cm; width= 3.8 cm; height= 1.9 cm). I was leaning towards a proximal radius or metatarsal but i would like a second opinion. The shape of the shaft cross section, in the fifth photo, is roughly triangular (where the bone would continue). The most common dinosaurs from this deposit are ornithopods such as Iguanodon and Hypsilophodon, so these would provide the best comparison. Thanks all!
  10. I've spent a fair amount of time now combing the beaches around Lyme Regis and Charmouth in Dorset, England, and thought i would put together a topic that presents all of my marine reptile bone finds (so far) in one place. The fossils here are Early Jurassic in age, approx. 195-190 million years old and come predominantly from the Blue Lias and Charmouth Mudstone formations. I first visited this area in 2013 with the simple goal of finding at least one ichthyosaur vertebra, and now after three subsequent trips in 2014, 2017 and 2019, i've put together a far better assortment of finds than i could have possibly hoped for! I think i have been quite lucky along this coastline, although it has taken many hours to amass this collection. Across all four of my England trips i have spent a total of 18 days looking for bones in the Lyme Regis area, most often on the stretch of beach between Lyme Regis and Charmouth but sometimes at Monmouth Beach as well. This coastline also produces a large quantity and diversity of ammonites, belemnites, crinoids, bivalves, brachiopods, gastropods, and even rare insects. However i've always been most interested in fossil vertebrates, and so the ichthyosaurs and plesiosaurs that are found here have been my primary target for collecting. There are also some impressive articulated fish to be found, but as yet i have had no luck in finding any! Ichthyosaur bones are the most common type of vertebrate fossil in the area, particularly their bi-concave vertebrae. Less commonly you can also find pieces of the jaw, sometimes with teeth. If you are extra lucky though you may also find plesiosaur bones, which for whatever reason are much rarer than those of ichthyosaurs. The best way to find any type of marine reptile bone around Lyme Regis is to closely examine the shingle on the beach, and i've spent seemingly countless hours bent over and slowly walking along the shore looking for them. If you have a bad back it's even more difficult! I've learnt that bones can be found pretty much anywhere on the beach: in the slumping clays, at the top of the beach in the 'high and dry' shingle, along the middle of the beach, at the low tide line, and also underwater amongst the rocky pools and ledges. And just when i start to think that the beach has already been heavily searched and there isn't much left to find, there always seems to be another bone that turns up, often lying in plain sight. The truth is that most people who visit here to collect are not experts and will probably walk past a lot of these bones, as the texture is the most important thing that gives them away and learning to recognise it takes a bit of time. For the sorts of articulated skeletons that sometimes make news headlines and are beautifully intact, searching the shingle is not the way to go, but for a short term visitor like me i think it is the best way of maximising the chances of finding any sort of reptile bone in the shortest amount of time (and something i can take back with me on the plane too!). Without further ado, here are the pics (spread across multiple posts due to file size limits). I've also included as-found pictures for some of these finds to provide a sense of what they look like and how they are found when they are on the beach. The collection so far. Starting first with my favourite Lyme Regis fossil, this is a very nice plesiosaur vertebra that is in great condition! A very rare find! I have been very fortunate to find two plesiosaur vertebrae at Lyme Regis so far, although this one is smaller and more beach-worn than the previous example. Continued below.
  11. England Vert ID’s

    Listed as stegosaur From Weymouth, England and would like to know if ID is correct. These are the only pictures provided.
  12. Hey all! I was visiting the Jurassic Coast in Devon yesterday and found these 3 fossils (I think) under the rocky cliffs on Lulworth Cove in Devon, England. ..does anyone know what they might be please? I have labelled each one 1, 2 and 3 and number 3 has 3 pictures attached; 3a,3b,3c. Unfortunately this is larger and a more difficult shape of rock to photograph. any help or advice on the ID of any of these would be great. PS. I am an amateur and have no idea if they even are fossils, but it would be exciting if they were. Thanks again for any help!
  13. An interesting web page on fake trilobites. Fake Trilobites, American Museum of Natural History https://www.amnh.org/research/paleontology/collections/fossil-invertebrate-collection/trilobite-website/the-trilobite-files/fake-trilobites Yours, Paul H.
  14. Altispinax paper

    Does anyone have a copy of the following paper to send me: Michael W. Maisch (2016) The nomenclatural status of the carnivorous dinosaur genus Altispinax v. Huene, 1923 (Saurischia, Theropoda) from the Lower Cretaceous of England. Neues Jahrbuch für Geologie und Paläontologie - Abhandlungen 280(2): 215-219 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1127/njgpa/2016/0576 http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/schweiz/njbgeol/2016/00000280/00000002/art00008
  15. Will be making another trip to London at the end of the month and wanted to know if anyone has recommendations for dinosaur related museums, things to see, etc. Fossil hunting may be out of the question due to the cold weather, unless there is a convenient option outside of the city nearby, or train ride away then I’m all ears (can be any material). May have to wait for a warmer holiday to go out for dinosaur hunting, Isle of Wight, etc., which I believe is 2-3 hours from London if I’m not mistaken. Anyhow any bit of advice would help. I have been to the Natural History Museum in London, but will be stopping by there again because of how much I enjoyed it the first time. One new stop will the be the museum in Oxford to see the beautiful Megalosaurus bucklandii, so definitely looking forward to that.
  16. Will be making another trip to London at the end of the month and wanted to know if anyone has recommendations for dinosaur related museums, things to see, etc. Fossil hunting may be out of the question due to the cold weather, unless there is a convenient option outside of the city nearby, or train ride away then I’m all ears (can be any material). May have to wait for a warmer holiday to go out for dinosaur hunting, Isle of Wight, etc., which I believe is 2-3 hours from London if I’m not mistaken. Anyhow any bit of advice would help. I have been to the Natural History Museum in London, but will be stopping by there again because of how much I enjoyed it the first time. One new stop will the be the museum in Oxford to see the beautiful Megalosaurus bucklandii, so definitely looking forward to that.
  17. Ornithischian Vertebra

    Hey everyone, recently came across this partial vertebra from the Kimmeridge Clay online, apparently collected south of Oxford. It measures 9.5cm x 8.5cm. The seller tentatively identified it as a Stegosaurid based on the internal pattern visible on the polished side, and subsequently assigned it to Dacentrurus, since it's the only Stegosaurid fitting the time and location. I tried to find more information on these supposed patterns indicative of Stegosaurs without much success, so I'd like to ask: › Is the vertebra actually identifiable on a family level? › If so, what are the defining characteristics and where could I read up about them? Thanks for your help!
  18. Fossil or not please

    Hi, i am very new to the hobby and just wondered if this is a fossil vertebrae of sorts or not. Its about 8cm long and 4cm width. Thanks for any help. The area is known for Plesiosaur and Ichthyosaur fossils but it doesn't look right from images I've seen. more pics available but i need to make files smaller.
  19. "I've Got the Snitch" Fossil hunter finds 185-million-year-old ‘golden snitch’ with ancient sea creature inside Charlotte Edwards, Digital Technology and Science Reporter, Nov. 18, 2019, https://www.thesun.co.uk/tech/10369483/golden-snitch-fossil-yorkshire/ Yours, Paul H.
  20. Meyeria Lobster Prepped

    Hi, Attached are photos of a small 5.5cm lobster I finished prepping. The original semi-prepped lump I purchased was identified as Shrimp or Crayfish, Cretaceous Period, from England. My research identifies it as a Meyeria Lobster from the "lobster beds" of the Greensand Formation, Fissicostatus Zone, Atherfield on the Isle of Wight, England. Does anyone have additional or corrected information?
  21. English Megalodon!

    Had a quick trip down to my local beach after work. We have had massive storms along with large spring tides so the red crag cliffs have taken a battering. Dodging heavy rain, thunder and lightning. Found nothing of major significance for an hour and was getting soaked through so decided to head back to the car with my tail between my legs. Walking along and this was just lying on the shingle! 95mm long just sitting there!!! My first complete Meg. Needless to say I was rather happy! Thanks for reading!
  22. My last fossil hunt in England

    Things have been really hectic over the last month in preparation (and actual event) of our international move. We left England on 27 September and stayed in Denver, CO for a week. We are now in Cheyenne, WY for the next 4 years. Before we left England I wanted to go on one last fossil hunt, and it was one of the best trips ever! On 23 Sept I set out for the beach at Bawdsey. It’s a mostly flint pebble beach with exposures of London Clay. It’s supposed to be good for shark teeth and it did not disappoint! Previously, I’ve only found up to 2 shark teeth at any location and that was on a miracle day. This day I found 10 and a quarter (that still counts, right?)! I found a few flint belemnites, or so they would appear. A lot of fossilized bone (the first I’ve ever found!). And some really pretty and sparkly chunks of pyrite. There is also a ton of pyritized wood, and some of the best preserved I’ve seen but I didn’t take any. Every time I found a shark tooth I would squeal with excitement. I’m glad I had the beach to myself for the 3 hours because I sounded like a kid finding hidden Easter eggs. Needless to say it was an amazing fossil day. I already miss England so much and wish I were back.
  23. This icthyosaur was found in 1850 and reburried by the family. They would periodically uncover then rebury the fossil. Now it is restored and hanging on a wall. https://allthatsinteresting.com/ichthyosaurus-fossil
  24. English Meg number 2!?!?

    Well following on from my post yesterday, I headed down to the same beach after work again. This time with no lightning or heavy rain to worry about. Started scanning the shingle picking up a few smaller teeth, the plan was to head up the cliffs maybe 500 yards and check at the base of them as this is where the better teeth are normally located. However, upon getting there, the cliffs were clearly not safe with many parts having overhanging material! My concerns were soon confirmed when a huge section came down a bit further down the beach. No tooth is worth getting buried for, so I soon changed to looking about halfway down the beach in the red crag material where you get rarer teeth some with really nice patterns. 5 minutes later I found this, a gorgeous 70mm Meg tip! This one was a lot less worn than the usual ones but unfortunately not complete! None the less I was still very happy! No further teeth and with darkness closing in I left happy again! Thanks for reading everyone!!! (Dear moderators, is there anyway you can rotate the photos? I am unable to! Thanks!!)
  25. Just got back from a trip to England - still fighting the jet lag a bit! 7 hours time difference makes for interesting sleep patterns! Thought y'all might want to see what I all I found in Great Britain! Of course, we started in London, doing all the London things, including the Natural History Museum! Got to see Mary Annings plesioarus and mosasaurs. And the archeoptyrix! And the dino room!! And much much much more.....whew. Left London to visit friends in Bury St. Edmund, near Cambridge. We went to see the Sutton Hoo burial near Ramsholt in Suffolk which I had heard of a fossil hunting spot there- didn't really get to look much because there was a boat burning at the docks.....so fire trucks and smoke and commotion. I found out later that the main hunting area was a 45 minute hike from the waterfront, so I kind of missed out. Wasn't really prepared to hike that far, with friends who aren't really into fossil hunting, so I contented myself with poking along the water front and found a couple of little things.... (not the shell, I found that embedded in the dirt at Framlingham Castle, not sure if it is a fossil or just a shell). I'm not really sure what any of them are, the bullet shape I was assuming was a cephalopod, but it might be a phragmocone and I really don't know what the little round one is, perhaps a vertebra? I didn't have a coin for scale, but the little round is 3/4 inch. Next on the fossil tour was Yaxley Hampton Vale lake near Petersborough. I had heard it was a good spot, if somewhat picked over, but I found it to be quite good! I didn't find any ammonites (which I was hoping for) or crinoids (although my friend who was driving found a HUGE crinoid stem - beginners luck, the rat). But found a nice sized belemnite, plus these those neat little white spicule things. I saw them ID'd somewhere a while back (sponges, I think) , but now I can't seem to find what they are called, so if you know, please let me know! A Swan at Yaxley: But the highlight of the trip was a guided tour around Weymouth, with the interesting and outspoken Adrian Davies! He picked us up and toured us all around Portland Island and Weymouth with info on the history of the town plus stops for fossil hunting! First stop was to a cobble beach with "roach stones"...what we in Texas call Rattlesnake Rock. My husband found a dolphin spine washed up (I really wanted to take some of the vertebra, but decided they might not let me back in the US)! You can see all the cobbles around the dolphin. My "roachstones" The view from Portland looking back toward Weymouth: And the best for last - my finds of ammonites (16 of which are pyrite!) , crinoids, belemnites, a phragmocone, a sponge and a bit of bone plus some other stuff: A few more pics of my finds: Me with my nose to the ground- it was a bit chilly and windy...and then I came home to the Texas heat.. And then a day later, I went to the Quarry at Midlothian on a 100 degree day. But that's another story.....
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