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Found 1,119 results

  1. Fish vertebrae ID ?

    Hi guys Is it possible to work out exactly what species of fish this fossil vertebrae is from, or is it too difficult to pinpoint ? Definitely fossilised. Found on the north coast of Norfolk U.K 25mm wide 7.5mm thick Happy Easter Matt
  2. Placoderm Fish with Fin?

    I found this fossil in Devonian rock in Johnson County, Iowa. I think it is a fossil of a placoderm fish, and I think it has a "fin" next to the quarter in the photo. The fin would be coming out of the placoderm plate at a perpendicular angle, which would make sense, but I have never found a fin before. I will attach a close-up photo of the "fin" below. Am I on the right track or is this something else? Thank you! Ben
  3. Hello everyone, half a year ago I bought this Phareodus fossil. I am extremely happy with it and know it’s real, but my question is how much, if any, has been retouched. There is obvious putty in the center of the fish to glue it together. There is a noticeable orange glaze over it which I’m wondering is just to keep it from getting scratched or damage. Thanks
  4. Help request! I am putting together a tool for judging rock age based on very crude, whole-rock, hand-sample observations of fossil faunas/floras -- the types of observations a child or beginner could successfully make. I view this as a complement to the very fine, species-level identifications commonly employed as index fossils for individual stages, biozones, etc. Attached is what I've got so far, but I can clearly use help with corals, mollusks, plants, vertebrates, ichnofossils, and the post-Paleozoic In the attached file, vibrant orange indicates times in earth history to commonly observe the item of interest; paler orange indicates times in earth history to less commonly observe the item of interest. White indicates very little to no practical probability of observing the item of interest. Please keep in mind that the listed indicators are things like “conspicuous horn corals,” purposefully declining to address rare encounters with groups of low preservation potential, low recognizability, etc. Got additions/amendments, especially for the groups mentioned above? Toss them in the comments below! Thank you..... https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1tVm_u6v573V4NACrdebb_1OsBEAz60dS1m4pCTckgyA
  5. Sussex U.K finds.

    Some of my latest finds from the Wealden strata of Sussex (135 MYA approx). Bexhill and Hastings. Hope collecting is going well for everyone. Quite rare and a very nice specimen of a Sauropod pes fossil footcast. 20cm. Nice curved gaff claw toe.Lateral view.
  6. I have been fossil hunting at Tillywhandland quarry near Forfar Scotland over past few months and found quite a few fossils that I thought I would share. The first fossil is an Ishnacanthus gracillis fossil, which I have just finished prepping tonight. It is pretty much complete apart from the very tip of the tail.
  7. Fish vertebrae?

    Here's another I have had since I was a kid, found in the St. Louis Missouri area. Thoughts on type of fish-and age?- seems pretty large. thanks! Stay healthy! Bone PS- the number is part of my "fossil museum" when I was 12 I started a fossil museum and would make tiny cards to explain the fossil, its age, etc. Still have them all and my up-front apologies, as I will be sending photos of most for help with i.d...
  8. Good Fishing

    So far the fishing has been good this year at the North Sulphur River Texas. Here's a few of my cretaceous fish finds from my past three hunts.
  9. fish are freakin hard to prep!

    I am always eager to try new things and develop or expand my skills. I've been putting in a lot of hours doing final prep on Hell Creek bone, and frankly, thats easy compared to these fish! I recently bought some un-prepped green river slabs from Ptychodus04. Since the weather and pandemic have put a halt to most things I began trying my hand at prepping these. Such a difference from working big dino bones! The fish bones are like fossilized hairs and unbelievably fragile. The matrix (on most of these) is extremely soft which makes clearing easy with a scribe, but also easy to blow it out. Using a soda blaster is a little more gentle, but still easy to blow out the fossil as soon as the matrix is gone. The bone details are so fine, I can understand how having a stereo microscope (along with a micro-jack scribe) would make this type of prep a lot easier. I think I did OK on my first fish. I'm scared to try and clear the spine any more because the bones are so thin and fragile. Then the second fish is in a harder matrix (and deep), but from what I've cleared so far, it seems to be a in a lot better condition. I'm afraid I may wear out my scribe exposing it though, LOL.
  10. Weird little fish (?) osteoderm

    Hey guys, Here's a small osteoderm I found recently on the Zandmotor in the Netherlands. I think it's possibly an osteoderm of a sturgeon or some other type of fish, but I'm really unsure. It kinda reminds me of a tiny alligator osteoderm... Anyone have an idea what it could be? It's probably from marine sediments of the Eem Formation, from the Eemian stage of the late Pleistocene (130'000 to 115'000 years old), but could easily be from the last Ice Age (around 40'000 years old), or older than the Eemian (anywhere in the Neogene is feasible actually, the Zandmotor has quite a bit of reworked fossils). Thanks in advance! Max
  11. Tar River NC Find

    Need some help with this one. I think it's fish, but beyond that I'm lost. Found on the banks of the Tar River in Eastern NC -- I believe Pliocene, Yorktown formation (other NC members please correct if wrong). First thought was fish tooth in a fragment of jaw but its all one piece, so not likely. Tooth with a strange piece of attached root, or not tooth at all, but bone?? Scale divisions are 1mm.
  12. Fish Heads in North Georgia?

    Hello all! This is my first post in the forum besides the introduction. I’m open to any and all interpretations on this piece. Did I just find a fish head in my backyard? There are tons of fossils (marine and palm) pouring out of the hills on my property. I’m so close to Chattanooga (10 minutes away), I imagine we would share similar geology but I’m unsure and try not to make assumptions. Yay for the scientific method! Found on the surface at the base of a shallow ravine among lots of fossil palm wood, shale outcroppings, and some volcanic(?) glass. Northern Walker co, Georgia, USA. Pictures are as follows... 1) “Right” side 2) “Left” side 3) “Top” 4) “Bottom” with “mouth” facing left 5) “Back” side with “top” at the top of photo 6) “Underside” with “mouth” at bottom left of photo 7) The location behind my driveway that keeps vomiting out fishy bits and petrified wood!
  13. 'Morning, everyone. I appreciate all the input on my last post, which was an outstanding demonstration of the Venn diagram of photography, limited magnification, and apparently wishful thinking... Less of a mystery here -- I'm trying to ID this little (11mm) fella. I collected him in 2010 at the Mazonia-Braidwood South Unit. The ESCONI guide doesn't seem to have anything similar -- thoughts? Thanks.
  14. Enchodus ferox

    From the album Cenomanian Shark Teeth and other Marine Fauna, Ryazan Oblast, Russia

    Enchodus ferox (Agassiz 1835) tooth. I believe this specimen to be an E. ferox, but I am unsure on my ID.
  15. Cretaceous Fish Vert

  16. North Sulphur River!

    Water was high and cold today but I found some cool stuff at the North Sulphur River Texas. The fossil fish is full of bones, verts and fins. The large worn bone is part of a pleisosaur paddle. The mosasaur vert has nice size and color.
  17. I ventured a bit into older territory and found a bone unfamiliar to me. Hopefully someone recognizes this. This was in a creek with rocks from a shallow marine/near shore environment. Thanks. Eagle Ford or Woodbine Formation North Central TX 90-95 mya
  18. Hello everyone! I purchased this has from an online auction a little while ago. It was advertised as a tooth but appears to me to be a small jaw section. I have looked for similar specimens online and it looks similar to that of a Eutrichiurides (see image 3), but I was hoping others could please confirm. The specimen is 41 mm/4.1 cm long, and 20 mm/2 cm high. The listings did not say where any of their specimens originated.Front Close-up of the tooth second from the rightSimilar specimen for reference, claimed to be Eutrichiurides.
  19. Everything was pretty well picked over in my regular spots so I took a thirteen mile eleven hour hike with a friend at the North Sulphur River Texas. Here's my finds. The mosaaur tooth, fish fin with verts, fish occipital condyle and the big Tylosaur vert made my day. The water moccasins were mating and did not appreciate us walking by. They both took the time to open their mouths and warn us to get away.
  20. East Coast Fossils Prep

    Turtle humerus found in a fallen block. From the Pope's Creek Sands of Virginia.
  21. Cretaceous Fish Fin

  22. Cretaceous Fish Fin

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