Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Fish'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • retired blog
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Books I have enjoyed
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • Between A Rock And A Hard Place
  • Rudist digging at "Point 25", St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria (Campanian, Gosau-group)
  • Prognathodon saturator 101

Calendars

  • Calendar

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Found 1,119 results

  1. I had a free morning last weekend, so I drove out to Jalama beach. A while ago while searching for good places to fossil hunt near Santa Barbara I saw this post and since then have stopped by twice for a few hours each to crack rocks without any luck. This time I finally found myself a Jalama beach fish. It's not in good enough shape to identify (for me, anyway), but it's nice to finally get something. I had read that the south side of the beach is more fossil rich, so I walked south until I didn't see any people and then started working my way back. The fossil-rich layer is a beige layered rock. This link, referenced in the post that got me interested in Jalama beach, refers to this formation as "the diatom beds of Lompoc." The cleavage is extremely nice and it reminds me of the green river formation fossils you see around (although it seems the fish are usually smaller). Most of the rock in the cliffs is a reddish brown crumbly rock without many fossils, and the first time I came I wasted a bunch of time messing around with that. You definitely have to poke around a bit to find the fossil rich rocks. Anyway, I found the fish almost immediately, and didn't find anything else as I worked my way back for the rest of the morning. I think next time I'll try to go even further south. There are a lot of fragments of algae fossils around and I only picked one up because it looked kind of interesting- I haven't really put any effort into identifying it yet. If anyone else is thinking about going to Jalama beach, I highly recommend bringing along a sharp flat chisel (see picture). I bought rectangular knife stock on Amazon and then sharpened it. It definitely helps in getting the rock to break along a plane instead of shattering, which is usually what happens with a regular geology hammer. Also, if you'd like some company I'd be happy to hunt with someone else, I don't really know anyone else in the area that does this.
  2. Help with ID of fish fossil

    This fossil was given to my 7 year old grandson by a retired friend who said her mother had collected it in New Jersey 50+ years ago. No other information. We’d like to get some basic information about it if possible. Pictures attached. Thank you for your help.
  3. Hi guys I recently bought this as a replica but having seen nothing like it I’ve been wondering about it’s authenticity to me the fish seems like a decent real fossil , however the turtle seems sculpted and the flippers are all off, the rock seems Like real fossiliferous lagersatte rock With fossil remains apparent on the back what do you thinks?
  4. Lebanon fossil fish ID #3

    This is the third one
  5. Lebanon fossil fish ID #6

    Last one, sixth
  6. Hi all In trying to build my collection(and knowledge), I am seeing one site in particular is selling fish fossils that does not really seem to be high quality, but it does look coloured. Especially one insect fossil looks quite badly drawn on. I own a few fossil fish and they all look sort of natural, these ones are particularly dark without a lot of fine detail. Is there a method where the fossil gets coloured in order to bring it out, or should I steer clear? I do prefer to pay more for a higher quality fossil that looks natural. Thanks guys.
  7. Lebanon fossil fish ID #5

    Fifth one
  8. Lebanon fossil fish ID #2

    This is the second one, two pieces which look to be the same type
  9. Lebanon fossil fish ID #4

    Fourth one
  10. Lebanon fossil fish ID #1

    Hello all, i recently purchased a group of Hjoula, Lebanon fish fossils that came unidentified. I tried searching them up but couldn’t match any of them. Any help in ID’ing their genera would be greatly appreciated. I will upload each in its separate thread. Here is the first one Thank you
  11. Below are some more of my macro fossils that I’ve recently put in 16”X12” Riker mount displays. All of the specimens in these displays come from the Miocene of Virginia. The first display with shark/ray specimens, the second display with bony fish specimens, the third display with marine mammal specimens and the last display with reptile specimens. I'm getting some more Riker mount displays Saturday and I'll post some more displays with more of my macro specimens from the Miocene of Virginia. To see a previous post with Riker mount displays with macro specimens from the Paleocene Aquia Formation of Maryland and the Eocene Nanjemoy Formation of Virginia check out the below link: http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/101415-a-few-riker-mounts-with-specimens-from-the-aquia-formation-of-maryland-and-the-nanjemoy-formation-of-virginia/ To see a previous post with Riker mount displays with macro specimens from the Miocene Round Mountain Silt Formation of California, the Eocene/Oligocene Chadron/Brule Formations of Nebraska, and the Miocene of Virginia check out the below link: http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/101441-a-few-more-riker-mount-displays-with-macro-specimens-from-the-round-mountain-silt-formation-of-california-the-chadronbrule-formations-of-nebraska-and-the-miocene-of-virginia/ Display with shark/ray specimens. The top of the display has shark vertebrae. Then there are Otodus megalodon teeth (for size reference the largest megalodon is 4.75” and the smallest is .625”). Then there are some Hemipristis serra shark teeth. The bottom has two eagle ray barbs and pieces of eagle ray dental plates. Display with bony fish specimens. The top of the display has bony fish vertebrae with a Wahoo jaw (6.5” long for size reference), a hypural fan, several bill fish bills and two small fish jaws. Then the middle has lots of fish jaws with some black drum jaws on the far left and most of the other jaws to the right being red drum. The bottom has ocean going sun fish bones including three jaws and there are some more bony fish vertebrae on the far right. Displays with marine mammal specimens. The top and middle of the display has Cetacean bulla and periotic ear bones (for size reference the largest is 3“). The bottom left has Cetacean vertebrae, flipper bones and two small jaw fragments. The right contains Cetacean teeth. Display with reptile specimens. The very top has two coprolites most likely crocodile. Then some crocodile jaw pieces with a number of crocodile teeth and a crocodile scute (for size reference 4.5” by 3.25”) on the far right. The bottom has turtle caprice/plastron pieces and a good number of leatherback turtle carapace bones. Marco Sr.
  12. Florida Fish Fossils

    Here are some of the fish fossils I have found, the first picture are some bones that I was hesitant to call fossils at first because they where scattered on top of a pile, but after find several other clay pockets ful of these I feel pretty good about them being gar fossils. Can anyone confirm, the internet is not being super helpful on this one? The next two are encased in a calcite geode i picked up while picking through the overburden, I didn't even see the imprints until i had washed it at home. Any ideas of what they are? From what i can barely tell, there are more in the geode, just not in convenient positions, and i don't want to break it to find them, a bird in the hand kinda deal.
  13. Fish / Reptile Tooth?

    Age: Eocene Aprox. 40 million years ago. Location: Western Washington Puget Sound area. First two photos have bad lighting but are just to show size. Second photos have higher quality. I believe this is a tooth. This trip I pulled out a shark tooth as well today (last photo) however this is more round than the usual shark tooth. I suspect fish or reptile but wanted further confirmation. If anyone has any ideas, they are welcome to comment
  14. Here are some fish vertebrae from the Isle of Sheppey, UK, which I would like to trade. They are from the London clay (Eocene aged). I have collected on the Isle of Sheppey a few times and have never found any fish fossils anywhere near as good as this. I am interested in anything from the upper Carboniferous of the UK or the USA, or Dinosaur teeth from any location. Thanks, Daniel
  15. Tooth or claw kem kem

    Hello together, there is a type of fossil from kem kem I have seen several times now under different descriptions in the net: It is either called a pterosaur wing claw, or an undescribed pharyngeal fish tooth. At least to my eye they look like the same structure. The number of specimens lets me think its rather fish than pterosaur, but I´d like to hear your opinions please. Here is an example: Thanks, J
  16. Spineless fossil fish

    Hi there, Could you please help me identify this fossil fish? It’s from the Vallecillo formation in northeast Mexico. Late Cretaceous. The fish is approximately 93 cms long and the head is 32 cms long which I found as a strange proportion. It lacks of vertebrae. I’m clueless with this one.
  17. Big head fish

    Anyone knows the name and age of this fossil? Overall size about 22X16 cmX5 Recently purchased in Taiwan
  18. Fish jaw?

    This fossil is present on a block containing what seem to be Elonichthys scales. I found it in the coal measures of Fife (Scotland). Am I correct to think this is a fish jaw? Thanks, Daniel
  19. Hi there! Now that Christmas and New Year's are done, I'm trying to continue organizing and labeling my fossils before I head back to work on Monday. I'm hoping I can get some help from you regarding the identities of 2 specimens: Specimen #1: a brachiopod from the Miocene (Burdigalian) of Sesimbra, Portugal: Specimen #2: two fish from the Eocene Green River Formation of Kemmerer, Wyoming: (fish on the left:) (fish on the right:) Thanks in advance for your help! Monica
  20. Help request! I am putting together a tool for judging rock age based on very crude, whole-rock, hand-sample observations of fossil faunas/floras -- the types of observations a child or beginner could successfully make. I view this as a complement to the very fine, species-level identifications commonly employed as index fossils for individual stages, biozones, etc. In this initial framework, vibrant orange indicates times in earth history to commonly observe the item of interest; paler orange indicates times in earth history to less commonly observe the item of interest. White indicates very little to no practical probability of observing the item of interest. Please keep in mind that the listed indicators are things like "conspicuous horn corals," purposefully declining to address rare encounters with groups of low preservation potential etc. Got additions/amendments? Toss them in the comments below! Thank you for your insight and assistance.....
  21. I bought a new old cabinet last winter and spent several months filling it with newly labeled specimens, most of them now stored in jewelry boxes. I took photos of it to show Tim, Fossildude19 and he suggested I post them in the Members Collections section. I followed his suggestion. The collection started in 2011 with a few fossil purchases off a well known public auction site. By the early spring of 2012 I was collecting in the field and the vast majority of my collection was self collected in that manner from sites, primarily in the Northeast and Ohio Valley as well as ones collected on trips to Texas, Germany and out west. There are also some gift specimens that I own thanks to the generosity of a number of friends, most of whom are on the Forum. The top of the cabinet is occupied by miscellaneous specimens, some that wouldn't fit in the drawers, some slated to be in a glass display case I hope to eventually get, and my collection of fossils found in New Jersey just above the Iridium Layer.
  22. a freind went for a fossil hunting in China's Beipiao, a well know lagerstatte of jehol biota ( early cretacous/late jurasic) . By chance he used a home UV light to check his pieces, just to find that one of them become fluorescent and revealing much more details. this should be a tyipcal Lycoptera davidi or sinensis
  23. Fish ID

    I was thinking this is a Knightia but now I’m not so sure. The body shape seems wrong and it does not appear to be compressed. @Fossildude19 @RJB
  24. Greetings, I recently bought a fossil vertebra from a moroccan seller who claimed it was a Plesiosaurus vertebra, and through I did not believe him I made a deal with him and I got the fossil for a cheap price. My guess it that it belongs to an Otodus chark or an Enchodus fish, is a quite big vertebrae anyway... What do you think? Thank you very much in advance.
  25. From the album fish

    Parasemionotus labordei Priem, 1924 Lower Triassic Dienerian Ambilobe Madagascar
×