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  1. @pachy-pleuro-whatnot-odon and I wrote a paper on Mosasaurus hoffmannii fossils from the Moroccan Phosphates. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/357836567_Occurrence_of_Mosasaurus_hoffmannii_Mantell_1829_Squamata_Mosasauridae_in_the_Maastrichtian_Phosphates_of_Morocco https://www.aaps-journal.org/pdf/JPS.C.22.0001.pdf Abstract: Marginal tooth crowns from the hypercarnivorous marine reptile Mosasaurus hoffmannii Mantell, 1829 are reported for the first time from the Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) phosphates of Morocco. Fossilized remains of this speci
  2. Jonathan Raymond

    My crocodilian tooth collection

    Here is my crocodilian tooth collection picture 1 Species: Alligator mississipiensis Age: 11 700 years- 2,58 million years ( Pleistocen ) Size: 3,96 centimeters Localisation: South Florida picture 2 Species: Thecachampsa americana Age: 2,6- 5,3 million years ( Pliocene ) Size: 2,69 centimeters Localisation: Polk County, Florida picture 3 and 4 Species : Maroccosuchus zennaroi Age : 48- 54 million years ( Early Eocene ) Size: 5,4 centimeters Localisation: Khourigba , Morocco Formation: Ouled Ab
  3. Jared C

    Beginner's luck

    Recently I took two friends out to go fossil hunting for the first time. It was a fun trip with cool finds, and one of those finds is a little bizarre. It's a late cretaceous bone (Ozan formation) from central texas, covered in pyrite. It almost reminds me of a broken scapula. Any thoughts? Sorry for the lack of measurements, I only have field photos.
  4. JoetheJerseyGuy

    Big Brook : Root, Rock or Mosasaur?

    Big Brook - New Jersey: Marlboro. Is this a root, rock or mosasaur? Edges where you would expect it. Forgive the dirty nails came from the brook.
  5. val horn

    late cretaceous unknown bone

    My first thought was that this was another piece of turtle which is common in the area, but when I looked at it again it is seems to be curved in to many ways. The "coral" growing on one edge is also unusual for the area-- i dont know what that reflects either. I will much appreciate help in understanding what I am looking at.
  6. Praefectus

    REMPC M0005

    From the album: Prae's Mosasaurs

    Carinodens belgicus. The corn-kernel toothed mosasaur.
  7. It's from Kansas and is Late Cretaceous age.
  8. Updated 1/17/20 I've taken a pretty firm position on the validity of Nanotyrannus ever since I spent some time looking at the Dueling Dinosaurs shortly after they were discovered. Subsequent to that, new information that I've become aware of just cemented my position. I'm interested in understanding the "truth" and have no problem looking at all available specimens that are in private hands or museums. The optics are very clear to me and I have difficulty understanding the debate. Collectors need to form their own opinion on this but I would like to share with you why I beli
  9. Soto-Acuña, Sergio; Vargas, Alexander O.; Kaluza, Jonatan; Leppe, Marcelo A.; Botelho, Joao F.; Palma-Liberona, José; Simon-Gutstein, Carolina; Fernández, Roy A.; Ortiz, Héctor; Milla, Verónica; Aravena, Bárbara, 2021. Bizarre tail weaponry in a transitional ankylosaur from subantarctic Chile. Nature: 1–5. doi:10.1038/s41586-021-04147-1. ISSN 1476-4687. Links: This bizarre armored dinosaur had a uniquely bladed tail weapon (nationalgeographic.com) This Dinosaur Found in Chile Had a Battle Ax for a Tail - The New York Times (nytimes.com) Stegouros is quite unus
  10. There are two Tyrannosaurs described in the Hell Creek & Lance Formations, Tyrannosaurus rex and Nanotyrannus lancensis. Teeth from these animals are the number one sought after and coveted item by collectors. I don't understand all the hoopla and prices they command since my friends who I collect with know that I'm not a tooth person and prefer bones and claws. However I've been fortunate to find and acquire a few teeth and will post a several of my nicer ones. My two most favorite T-rex teeth are my biggest and smallest: The Baby (one of the rarest teeth around) is 1 1/8" and w
  11. Hi, I'm looking for a nice example of a Spinosaurus tooth for a gift to a Spinosaurus lover. I'm not quite sure the best place to look, but I did find this one coming up in an auction. I wondered if anyone would be willing to offer an opinion on this one? Thank you!
  12. 2 weeks ago, I surface hunted fossils at my favorite spot in Kumamoto Prefecture, Japan. It was a very hot day of November and as I was alone and had plenty of time, I have been able to return to several spots (same formation though) I do not often go to. As usual, as the places I went are part of a national park, you are not allowed to take fossils directly from the formation however you can still take back rocks that felt from the cliff or which lies on the beach. I first stopped at Kojima's camp site. Kojima is a very small island (the name Kojima means small is
  13. You're not going to believe your eyes, but a new jaw-dropping paper is available online: de Souza GA, Soares MB, Weinschütz LC, Wilner E, Lopes RT, de Araújo OM, Kellner AW (2021). The first edentulous ceratosaur from South America. Scientific Reports 11 (1): Article number 22281. doi:10.1038/s41598-021-01312-4. The discovery of Berthasaura reveals that not all ceratosaurs from the Late Cretaceous had teeth, because the jaws of Berthasaura lacked teeth. The Asian elaphrosaurine Limusaurus is also toothless, but the Late Cretaceous age of Berthasaura shows that some toot
  14. Troodon

    Best Dinosaur Books

    My advice to any collector who is interested in dinosaurs is to become as much an expert as possible and do not rely solely on others for identification. One way to do so is to start a library of good reference books and pdf papers. This topic will focus on BOOKS There are a few must have books, if you're interested in TEETH and in my opinion this is the bible for North American ones. Dinosaur Systematics Approaches and Perspectives by Carpenter & Currie Addresses : 1)Chapter with detailed illustrations and ID guide of the teeth of Alberta's theropod's that are basical
  15. Hi TFF friends, it's been a while. I hope you're all fine. This week, I explored my favorite place in Kumamoto prefecture (trip report coming these week-end) and found the following fossil. First time I saw such fossil from this location. I have browsed the literature related to this location but I unfortunately didn't find any clues about what this fossil could be. I suspect this could be some kind of fish tooth. In the all the papers I read about this location, I found some mentions of fish material found there but no description or further information.
  16. This heteromorphic species is characterized by an open plain spiral shape with slightly rursiradiate ribs and 3 sets of tubercles; 2 sets of ventrolateral tubercles, and 1 set of ventral tubercles. The whorl section is compressed and does not have constrictions in United States specimens but does have constrictions in many European specimens. The distance between ribs is roughly the same as the width of a rib. As far as I know, there are only two species reported for this genus, with the other being Phlycticrioceras rude from the late Santonian of France (Kennedy 1995). P. trinodosum is the on
  17. sharkysaurus

    What is this trace fossil?

    Hi everyone! I recently found a trace fossil near my house. I live in Southeast Colorado Springs and there's a lot of marine fossils near where I live. I found what I believe is an ammonite trace fossil. I'm having some trouble identifying it though. I'm not exactly sure what ammonite it's from as well as what formation it's from and what type of stone it's in. I brought it in to the museum I volunteer at and it was determined by the curator that it is not sandstone and it's most likely from the Late Cretaceous. I think it might be from a Hoploscaphites cheyennensis in silt-stone from maybe th
  18. The Judith River Formation is a late Cretaceous geological formation that was primarily deposited in North Central Montana 80 to 75 million years ago about the same time as the Two Medicine Formation, See Map - Large meandering rivers flowing into the Intercontinental Cretaceous Seaway deposited the Formation. Much of the area was very flat, with swamps and bogs, much like today's southern Louisiana. Dinosaurs included Tyrannosaurs, the duck-bills hadrosaur Brachylophosaurus was the most common found, Ceratopsian included Avaceratops and smaller theropods like Tr
  19. A new paper is out online, if anyone is interested: Evans DC, Brown CM, You H, Campione NE (2021). Description and revised diagnosis of Asia's first recorded pachycephalosaurid, Sinocephale bexelli gen. nov., from the Upper Cretaceous of Inner Mongolia, China. Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences. in press. doi:10.1139/cjes-2020-0190. The renaming of "Troodon" bexelli as Sinocephale is the latest instance of an old dinosaur taxon being turned into new, because despite being minimal, the holotype parietal still houses useful anatomical data to distinguish it from other pac
  20. I purchased these as Ingenia yanshini which I think became Ajancingenia, which then became and is currently Heyuannia. The formation provided is the Djadochta Formation, but that doesn't seem right since Ingenia/Heyuannia is not found there as far as I've checked. Unfortunately, there isn't provenance other than Mongolia attached to them to say whether they come from the Barun Goyot Formation where Heyuannia yanshini is found. While I'm not necessarily doubting the original ID, I just don't really know. I'm not expecting a positive or diagnostic ID to the genus level, but I wanted
  21. JoetheJerseyGuy

    Big Brook - Fossil Id

    Big Brook, no cutting edge, worn. Different then rocks or concretions in the area.
  22. I found this piece of late Cretaceous petrified wood in the Dawson formation of Colorado. Most of the piece however is this grey ash colored rock and I was just wondering, 1. What type of rock is it? I’m willing to do tests such as scratch and hardness if it will help. 2. How was it formed? 3. When was it formed? Did it form during fossilization or much more recently? Thanks for any and all help.
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