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Found 391 results

  1. Hi all, This limb bone was found along the River Crouch in Essex, UK. Pleistocene and Eocene deposits in the area. Any ideas where it could have come from? Thanks. Jay
  2. Mammal tooth from Essex UK

    Hello, This tooth was found along Mayland Creek in Essex, UK. Generally Eocene (London Clay) and some relatively modern Pliocene/Pliestocene deposits in the area. Is it likely to be a fossil, and what animal could it be from? Thanks in advance. Jay
  3. Teeth and mandibles-Bos or Bison?

    Found a tooth walking along the gravel/sandbars of a creek in central Iowa (Des Moines lobe) and came across the tooth on the right. I was surprised to find both these jaws about 1,000 ft apart and a mile downstream. I assumed they were the source, but looks like the loose tooth may be an upper (it's larger) and both these jaws seem to be full. The teeth don't seem to match up symmetrically either, making me think it might be different individuals. Modern and ancient bison remains are pretty commonly found here (the former being extirpated ~100 years ago), but I figure cows are just common enough to confound things. They seem to have the stylids I read about, but I can't tell if they are strong/prominent enough to be Bison. Any help would be appreciated!
  4. Unknown mammal vertebra

    This was a creek find in Central Illinois. We don't know how old or really anything about it. Bison remains turn up somewhat frequently but it looks like maybe horse? probably modern? I apologize for the difficult to read scale. It is a six inch scale, that's all I have at work unfortunately. Thank you for any help.
  5. I collected this piece washed up onto my beach where I have previously found anything from Miocene fossil shark teeth, acheulean period stone tools to Pleistocene horse teeth. It has an interesting symmetrical shape and reminds me of a wolf's face. Not that easy to photograph. Photos below are of all 'sides'. Any help with ID would be fantastic. Thanking you in advance.
  6. Dinosaur or Mammal bone ID help

    I found this on the bank of the Red Deer River in Alberta Canada. I have no idea what it's from. I have never found a fossilized bone before. Does anyone have any ideas? Not sure if it could be from a Dinosaur or a mammal like a young mammoth or something. I would love to get some ideas on this one. I am willing to answer any questions or take new photos if needed.
  7. Found near Hogtown Creek in Gainesville
  8. I was going to post this in the fossil of the month for July, until I looked at the date it was collected...mid-June. My, how time flies. Last Spring I found a nice Eocene mammal tooth site west of home. In a few hours I collected a few teeth and made a note to return soon. I did so in June and spent another few hours there (as well as exploring other nearby sites). I collected about 20 complete isolated mammal teeth and two jaws. Here is the better of the two. I am pretty tickled with not only this specimen, but this site as well. It will be a lot of fun to keep going back to. That is my fingerprint for scale. The front of the jaw is facing left; the missing jaw joint is on the right. Notice that the first tooth on the left (third premolar) is taller than the others, and that the third molar (right-most tooth) is quite long. As far as I know, these make it a primate. Not a monkey, mind you, but something along the lines of more primitive primates, such as tarsiers. (Then again, the current classification of these things is quite complicated and it may not be a primate at all). There was quite a collection of these things and similar beasts here during the Eocene, mostly quite small and only known from teeth and jaws. so in FOTM format: Date of Discovery... 15 June 2019 Scientific and/or Common Name... Primate Geologic Age or Geologic Formation... Wind River Fm., early Eocene State, Province, or Region Found... Wyoming Photos of Find (Please limit to 4 clear, cropped, and well-lit images.) see below. (If prepped, before and after photos are required, please.)
  9. Bone ID

    his was found in a creek in the twin city area in Minnesota. Looks old to me but maybe just discolored from being in the water? Thanks in advance T
  10. Mammal teeth GMR

    Hi all! I'm hoping for some insight. I found two mammal teeth at GMR today and I am not 100% sure what they are. I was thinking peccary or deer. Assistance is appreciated.
  11. Mystery Skull

    I bought this skull at a bones and brews event. I was told it was a 35 million year old camel skull. However, i noticed thats probably not true. Do any of you guys know what this is?
  12. Hi guys! I haven't been on TFF for AGES but am getting back in the groove. My question for y'all today is regarding these fossils. They are Pleistocene cave bear fossils from Romania. I bought these as juvenile intervertebral disks. Is that what these are? They are much lighter and led dense than verts. I'm curious.
  13. https://uk.reuters.com/article/uk-science-mammal/gulp-jurassic-mammal-was-the-first-one-able-to-eat-politely-idUKKCN1UD2MS https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/article/microdocodon-gracilis/ https://phys.org/news/2019-07-jurassic-fossil-early-mammals-swallow.html
  14. Mammal tooth id

    Hi guys, I found this mammal tooth a while ago at the Zandmotor near Den Haag in the Netherlands. You can find there fossils from the Quaternary period. The tooth is about 2 cm long and the crown is quite damaged. Looks a bit like a very small woolly rhino tooth but I am really not sure. Can anybody help me? Maybe @Harry Pristis or @LordTrilobite ? Here is the tooth:
  15. White River fm. Mammal Teeth

    Hey everyone, I found these teeth in the White River fm of eastern Wyoming last summer and wanted to see what people on the forum thought they were. 1st is what I believe to be an oreodont tooth (possibly Merycoidodon). It's .8 cm wide and 1.5 cm from root to crown. 2nd I believe may be a Poebrotherium tooth but I'm unsure. It's about .5 cm wide and .9 cm long. 3rd may be from a Leptomeryx but I'm not sure. It's about .4 cm wide and .9 cm long.
  16. Toe bone ID

    This little bone is a little bit worn but I think there’s enough of the shape here to get an ID. It looks a lot like the proximal phalanx from Equus. It measures 1 5/8 inches long x 3/4 inch wide. Could it be the proximal phalanx from a three toed horse?
  17. Anyone know what this it?

    Does anyone know what this is? It doesn’t look like a fossil and it looks like some sort of horn/antler section of a mammal. It’s about 7cm long. Thanks in advance.
  18. I watched a show on PBS last night, "When Whales Walked: Journeys in Deep Time." I just happened to notice it on the guide about 45 minutes before it was on. It is actually about more than the evolution of whales, the group having four-footed Early Eocene ancestors. There is a long segment roughly twenty minutes long each on crocodilians, birds, whales, and elephants. I thought it was a good show overall with interviews of researchers I know from their technical articles ( Hans-Dieter Sues, Philip Gingerich, Emmanel Gheerbrant, Christian de Muizon). However, each segment was also a little light on content for the topic and one was especially unclear. The one on birds made it appear that Deinonychus was an ancestor of later birds. They should have showed a chart showing when it lived in the Cretaceous with Archaeopteryx and the Liaoning birds millions of years before. There was a quick view of a family tree that seemed to illustrate that but it went by in a second or two. The segment on whales showed a lot of footage of modern whales and some great background on the "first whale," Pakicetus, but it didn't show any of the whales described in the past twenty years. It just mentioned that there had been recent discoveries. I thought there should have been at least a quick look at Ambulocetus and a few of the increasingly more marine-adapted forms that lived before Basilosaurus. They pretty much jumped from Pakicetus to Basilosaurus to the divergence of toothed and baleen whales. I think they could have spent the two hours just on the whales just as the title of the show led me to believe. I liked the segment on elephants because just as I was expecting the show to skip the earliest known members of the group, they go to Morocco and then talk to Emmanuel Gheerbrant who described Phosphatherium, the first probiscidean, which is known from the same early Eocene phosphate layer as a lot of the shark teeth we see at shows are from. Other extinct forms were descussed as well. Here's a link that takes to an online notice and website: https://www.pbs.org/show/when-whales-walked-journeys-deep-time/ Jess
  19. Recently I’ve found some strange fossils from an area in Simi Valley (Southern California). I had thought there were only shells, but turns out there is vertebrate material! Among other fragments, I found a couple big whale vertebrae as well as this piece here that I am unsure about. I’ve seen some mentions of fossils from smaller marine mammals like dolphins and pinnipeds, maybe it’s one of those? Unfortunately there only one end present, so I’m not expecting to get anything too specific. The formation is about 5 million to 11 thousand years more. Hopefully I can get some more interesting things from that spot. Thanks!
  20. Hi all, I thought I would start off with my most recent find and one that has been making me crazy trying to figure out what it is. It is obviously a pelvic area from some mammal. The rear part of it looks like mammoth but I can’t find anything on the web that looks like that front area with the beaklike bone. My first attempt at posting pics on here so hopefully this works. I realize it is upside down but it is too delicate to flip over
  21. Pleistocene mammal bone

    I found this on the Brazos River a while back and I am just now getting to it for an ID. Any help is appreciated. @Harry Pristis @Uncle Siphuncle
  22. Hey everybody, I'm on vacation at the outer banks, North Carolina and I've just found this vertebrae, but im not sure what animal it is from or even if it is fossilized, if anyone could give more insight it would be greatly appreciated, and i could post more pics upon request.
  23. Mammal Tooth?

    I found this on Topsail Island the other day. I know some people have found horse teeth on the beach so curious if this is a broken one. Looks like a molar.
  24. Pleistocene Mammal Tooth Help

    Hello, I need some help identifying this small mammal tooth crown that I found on a beach in Tampa Bay. Thank you!
  25. Sharktooth Hill mammal tooth

    Hello TFF, I found this mammal tooth recently at Sharktooth Hill in Bakersfield, CA. It's about .5" long and looks like a bit of the enamel has broken off. I think it might be a Neotherium mirum tooth but I'm hoping someone more educated can nail it down for me. Thanks for the help!
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