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  1. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Archimedes bryzoan in matrix, crinoid spine on reverse Bangor Limestone Formation, North Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 yrs old) Archimedes is a genus of bryozoans belonging to the family Fenestellidae. The first use of the term "Archimedes" in relation to this genus was in 1838. This genus of bryozoans is named Archimedes because of its corkscrew shape, in analogy to the Archimedes' screw, a type of water pump which inspired modern ship propellers. These forms are pretty common as fossils but they have been e
  2. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Archimedes bryzoan in matrix, crinoid spine on reverse Bangor Limestone Formation, North Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 yrs old) Archimedes is a genus of bryozoans belonging to the family Fenestellidae. The first use of the term "Archimedes" in relation to this genus was in 1838. This genus of bryozoans is named Archimedes because of its corkscrew shape, in analogy to the Archimedes' screw, a type of water pump which inspired modern ship propellers. These forms are pretty common as fossils but they have been e
  3. Dpaul7

    Brachiopod - Schellwienella-sp a.jpg

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Schellwienella sp. Brachiopod Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 yrs old) Strophomenata is an extinct class of brachiopods in the subphylum Rhynchonelliformea. Brachiopods, phylum Brachiopoda, are a group of lophotrochozoan animals that have hard "valves" (shells) on the upper and lower surfaces, unlike the left and right arrangement in bivalve molluscs. Brachiopod valves are hinged at the rear end, while the front can be opened for feeding or closed fo
  4. Dpaul7

    Brachiopod - Schellwienella-sp a.jpg

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Schellwienella sp. Brachiopod Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 yrs old) Strophomenata is an extinct class of brachiopods in the subphylum Rhynchonelliformea. Brachiopods, phylum Brachiopoda, are a group of lophotrochozoan animals that have hard "valves" (shells) on the upper and lower surfaces, unlike the left and right arrangement in bivalve molluscs. Brachiopod valves are hinged at the rear end, while the front can be opened for feeding or closed fo
  5. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Deltodus primus Shark Tooth in matrix Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 yrs old) The Cochliodontiformes are an extinct group of cartilaginous fish, which is mainly known through fossil and tooth plate finds and occurred from the Upper Carboniferous to the Upper Permian. Externally, the fish looked like skinned, flattened transitional forms between primitive sharks and today's sea cats (Chimaeriformes). Upper and lower jaws were each occupied in each ha
  6. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Deltodus primus Shark Tooth in matrix Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 yrs old) The Cochliodontiformes are an extinct group of cartilaginous fish, which is mainly known through fossil and tooth plate finds and occurred from the Upper Carboniferous to the Upper Permian. Externally, the fish looked like skinned, flattened transitional forms between primitive sharks and today's sea cats (Chimaeriformes). Upper and lower jaws were each occupied in each ha
  7. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Graveyard Fossil - Crinoid, Bryzoan, Mollusk Fragments SITE LOCATION: Bangor Formation, Northern Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (325,000,000 years ago) Data: Various types of fossil fragments, crinoid stems, bryzoan sections, a shell fragment or two from mollusks.
  8. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Graveyard Fossil - Crinoid, Bryzoan, Mollusk Fragments SITE LOCATION: Bangor Formation, Northern Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (325,000,000 years ago) Data: Various types of fossil fragments, crinoid stems, bryzoan sections, a shell fragment or two from mollusks.
  9. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Orthonychia Gastropod SITE LOCATION: northern Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 yrs old) Orthonychiidae is an extinct taxonomic family of fossil sea snails, marine, gastropod mollusks in the clade Cyrtoneritimorpha. There is an unusually great degree of variability within the shells of species in the genus Orthonychia, but an analysis of this variability has not been done yet (2008). Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Gastropoda Family: †Orthonychiida
  10. Dpaul7

    Mollusca Shizodus depressus a.jpg

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Shizodus depressus bi-valve SITE LOCATION: Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 yrs old) Trigoniida is order of medium-sized saltwater clams, marine bivalve molluscs. Within the fossil record the occurrence of this order is widespread, ranging from the Devonian Period to Recent. The diagnostic feature for the order is the unique and complex dentition of the shell, (i.e. the interior hinge teeth that articulate the two valves). The dentition is particularly elaborate within the
  11. Dpaul7

    Mollusca Shizodus depressus a.jpg

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Shizodus depressus bi-valve SITE LOCATION: Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 yrs old) Trigoniida is order of medium-sized saltwater clams, marine bivalve molluscs. Within the fossil record the occurrence of this order is widespread, ranging from the Devonian Period to Recent. The diagnostic feature for the order is the unique and complex dentition of the shell, (i.e. the interior hinge teeth that articulate the two valves). The dentition is particularly elaborate within the
  12. Dpaul7

    Eumetria vera brachiopods.jpg

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Eumetria vera Brachiopods SITE LOCATION: Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 yrs old) Athyridida is an order of Paleozoic brachiopods included in the Rhynchonellata, which makes up part of the articulate brachiopods. The Athyridida are the Rostrospracea of R.C Moore, 1952,[3] considered at that time to be a suborder of the Spiriferida. As with the Spiriferida, the Athyridida have outwardly directed spiral brachidia that support the lophophores on either side, but instead have non-plicate shells
  13. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Anthracospirifer increbescens brachiopod in matrix SITE LOCATION: Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 yrs old) Spiriferida is an order of extinct articulate brachiopod fossils which are known for their long hinge-line, which is often the widest part of the shell. In some genera (e.g. Mucrospirifer) it is greatly elongated, giving them a wing-like appearance. They often have a deep fold down the center of the shell. The feature that gives the spiriferids their name ("spiral-bearers") is the inter
  14. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Anthracospirifer increbescens brachiopod in matrix SITE LOCATION: Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 yrs old) Spiriferida is an order of extinct articulate brachiopod fossils which are known for their long hinge-line, which is often the widest part of the shell. In some genera (e.g. Mucrospirifer) it is greatly elongated, giving them a wing-like appearance. They often have a deep fold down the center of the shell. The feature that gives the spiriferids their name ("spiral-bearers") is the inter
  15. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Anthracospirifer increbescens brachiopod SITE LOCATION: Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 yrs old) Spiriferida is an order of extinct articulate brachiopod fossils which are known for their long hinge-line, which is often the widest part of the shell. In some genera (e.g. Mucrospirifer) it is greatly elongated, giving them a wing-like appearance. They often have a deep fold down the center of the shell. The feature that gives the spiriferids their name ("spiral-bearers") is the internal suppor
  16. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Anthracospirifer increbescens brachiopod SITE LOCATION: Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 yrs old) Spiriferida is an order of extinct articulate brachiopod fossils which are known for their long hinge-line, which is often the widest part of the shell. In some genera (e.g. Mucrospirifer) it is greatly elongated, giving them a wing-like appearance. They often have a deep fold down the center of the shell. The feature that gives the spiriferids their name ("spiral-bearers") is the internal suppor
  17. Dpaul7

    Horn Coral Group.jpg

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Horn Coral SITE LOCATION: Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 yrs old) Horn Corals are from the extinct order of corals called Rugosa. Rugose means wrinkled. The outside of these corals have a wrinkled appearance. Horn Coral grows in a long cone shape like a bull’s horn. The fossil is the skeleton of the coral animal or polyp. They built these cone shaped structures from calcium carbonate that came from the ocean water. The animal lived at the top of the cone. As the animal got bigger it added more mat
  18. Dpaul7

    Graveyard fossil side a.jpg

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Graveyard Fossil - with Trilobite Appendage SITE LOCATION: Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 years old) A "Graveyard" style fossil; many animals here. Both sides of the specimen show bryzoan remnants, some crinoid, Mollusk and Bryzoan remnants.
  19. Dpaul7

    Graveyard fossil side a.jpg

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Graveyard Fossil - with Trilobite Appendage SITE LOCATION: Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 years old) A "Graveyard" style fossil; many animals here. Both sides of the specimen show bryzoan remnants, some crinoid, Mollusk and Bryzoan remnants.
  20. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Thin Crinoid Stems showing attachment nodes for cirri SITE LOCATION: Fort Payne Chert Formation, Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period ca 350,000,000 yrs old Data: A crinoid stem. Crinoids are marine animals that make up the class Crinoidea of the echinoderms (phylum Echinodermata). The name comes from the Greek word krinon, "a lily", and eidos, "form". They live in both shallow water and in depths as great as 9,000 meters (30,000 ft). Those crinoids which in their adult form are attached to the sea bottom by a stalk are commonly called sea lilies. The unstalked forms are called f
  21. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Crinoid Stem Showing Interior Structure SITE LOCATION: Fort Payne Chert Formation, Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period ca 350,000,000 yrs old Data: A crinoid stem. Crinoids are marine animals that make up the class Crinoidea of the echinoderms (phylum Echinodermata). The name comes from the Greek word krinon, "a lily", and eidos, "form". They live in both shallow water and in depths as great as 9,000 meters (30,000 ft). Those crinoids which in their adult form are attached to the sea bottom by a stalk are commonly called sea lilies. The unstalked forms are called feather
  22. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Crinoid - Phanocrinus formosus SITE LOCATION: Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 yrs old) Data: Crinoids are marine animals that make up the class Crinoidea of the echinoderms. The name comes from the Greek word krinon, "a lily", and eidos, "form". They live in both shallow water and in depths as great as 9,000 meters. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Echinodermata Class: Cridoidea Order: †Cladida Family: †Synerocrinidae Genus: †Phanocrinus Species: †formosus
  23. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Crinoid - Phanocrinus formosus SITE LOCATION: Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 yrs old) Data: Crinoids are marine animals that make up the class Crinoidea of the echinoderms. The name comes from the Greek word krinon, "a lily", and eidos, "form". They live in both shallow water and in depths as great as 9,000 meters. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Echinodermata Class: Cridoidea Order: †Cladida Family: †Synerocrinidae Genus: †Phanocrinus Species: †formosus
  24. Dpaul7

    Eucalyptocrinities Crinoid Calyx.jpg

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Eupachycrinus Crinoid Calyx Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 years old) Data: Crinoids are marine animals that make up the class Crinoidea of the echinoderms (phylum Echinodermata). The name comes from the Greek word krinon, "a lily", and eidos, "form". They live in both shallow water and in depths as great as 9,000 meters (30,000 ft). Those crinoids which in their adult form are attached to the sea bottom by a stalk are commonly called sea lilies. The unstalked forms are called feather stars or com
  25. Dpaul7

    Thick Crinoid Stem in Matrix.jpg

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Thick Crinoid Stem in Matrix Fort Payne Chert Formation, Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period ca 350,000,000 yrs old Data: A crinoid stem. Crinoids are marine animals that make up the class Crinoidea of the echinoderms (phylum Echinodermata). The name comes from the Greek word krinon, "a lily", and eidos, "form". They live in both shallow water and in depths as great as 9,000 meters (30,000 ft). Those crinoids which in their adult form are attached to the sea bottom by a stalk are commonly called sea lilies. The unstalked forms are called feather stars or comatulids. Crino
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