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Found 977 results

  1. Orthocera group.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Orthocera Specimens 11" x 18" Morocco Data: Orthoceras ("straight horn") is a genus of extinct nautiloid cephalopod endemic to Middle Ordovician-aged marine limestones of the Baltic States and Sweden. This genus is sometimes called Orthoceratites. Note it is sometimes misspelled as Orthocera, Orthocerus or Orthoceros (Sweet 1964:K222). Orthoceras was formerly thought to have had a worldwide distribution due to the genus' use as a wastebasket taxon for numerous species of conical-shelled nautiloids throughout the Paleozoic and Triassic. Now, Orthoceras sensu stricto refers to O. regulare, of Ordovician-aged Baltic Sea limestones of Sweden and neighboring areas. These are slender, elongate shells with the middle of the body chamber transversely constricted, and a subcentral orthochoanitic siphuncle. The surface is ornamented by a network of fine lirae (Sweet 1964:K224). Many other very similar species are included under the genus Michelinoceras. Orthoceras and related orthoconic nautiloid cephalopods are often confused with the superficially similar Baculites and related Cretaceous orthoconic ammonoids. Both are long and tubular in form, and both are common items for sale in rock shops (often under each other's names). Both lineages evidently evolved the tubular form independently of one another, and at different times in earth history. Orthoceras lived much earlier (Middle Ordovician) than Baculites (Late Cretaceous). The two types of fossils can be distinguished by many features, most obvious among which is the suture line: simple in Orthoceras, intricately foliated in Baculites and related forms. TIME PERIOD: Middle Ordovician (458-470 Million Years Ago) Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Cephalopoda Order: †Orthocerida Family: †Orthoceratidae Genus: †Orthoceras
  2. Kem Kem Vertebrae ID Thread

    So, lets figure out vertebrae from the Kem Kem beds. As many of you know the Kem Kem beds has a pretty enigmatic palaeo fauna. There is some literature about it, but not a whole lot. Some of it is behind a paywall and much information is pretty scattered. So I got this idea that maybe we could combine our knowledge and information to collectively get a better picture of which bone belongs to which animal, in this case, vertebrae. I know some of you have some fantastic specimens in your collections, if we combine these in this thread we might be able to see some patterns. We probably won't be able to put a genus or species name on each type, but perhaps assigning certain vertebrae to a morphotype might be possible. With that I encourage everyone that has any vertebrae from the Kem Kem beds to share photos of their specimens and post them here so we can use this thread as a sort of library as well as an ID thread that everyone can use to better ID their Kem Kem vertebrae. So please, share your photos! And it might help to number your specimens for easier reference. I will be updating this first post as new information arises with examples to make ID easier. Theropods Spinosaurus aegyptiacus Spinosaurus is known for it's tall neural spines, which are pretty characteristic. Unlike Sigilmassasaurus, Spinosaurus does not have the ventral triangular rough plateau on the centra Spinosaurus cervical vertebrae Spinosaurus dorsal, sacral and caudal vertebrae Sigilmassasaurus brevicollis Sigilmassasaurus is a Spinosaurid that might be closely related to Baryonyx and Suchomimus. It differs from Spinosaurus in that it has a ventral keel on many vertebrae and a triangular rough plateau on the bottom back end. A is Sigilmassasaurus, B is Baryonyx Sigilmassasaurus cervical vertebrae Sigilmassasaurus dorsal vertebrae Indeterminate Spinosaurid vertebrae Not a whole lot has been published yet, so some bones can probably not be ID'd on genus level. Spinosaurid caudal vertebrae From Paleoworld-101's collection Charcharodontosaurids Due to an old paper Sigilmassasaurus vertebrae are sometimes misidentified as Carcharodontosaurid. These vertebrae should be identified on the basis of the original description by Stromer. Carcharodontosaurid cervical vertebrae Deltadromeus agilis better examples needed Abelisauroids Indeterminate Abelisauroid distal caudal From LordTrilobite's collection Abelisaurid dorsal vertebrae From Troodon's collection Sauropods Rebbachisaurus garasbae Not a whole lot is known about this titanosaur, as only a few bones have been found. Notice that the vertebrae are very extensively pneumaticised. Rebbachisaurus dorsal vertebrae Unnamed Titanosaurian mid caudal vertebra Crocodiles more examples needed Kemkemia This crocodile is only known by a single terminal caudal vertebra. Kemkemia caudal vertebra Turtles examples needed Pterosaurs Azhdarchids Azhdarchid (probably Alanqa) posterior fragment cervical vertebra Azhdarchid Mid cervical vertebra Sources Spinosaurids https://peerj.com/articles/1323/?utm_source=TrendMD&utm_campaign=PeerJ_TrendMD_1&utm_medium=TrendMD http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0144695 Sauropods Jeffrey A. Wilson & Ronan Allain (2015) Osteology of Rebbachisaurus garasbae Lavocat, 1954, a diplodocoid (Dinosauria, Sauropoda) from the early Late Cretaceous–aged Kem Kem beds of southeastern Morocco, Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 35:4, e1000701, DOI: 10.1080/02724634.2014.1000701 https://www.researchgate.net/publication/304214496_Evidence_of_a_derived_titanosaurian_Dinosauria_Sauropoda_in_the_Kem_Kem_beds_of_Morocco_with_comments_on_sauropod_paleoecology_in_the_Cretaceous_of_Africa Kemkemia sisn.pagepress.org/index.php/nhs/article/viewFile/nhs.2012.119/32 Pterosaurs https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.thefossilforum.com%2Fapplications%2Fcore%2Finterface%2Ffile%2Fattachment.php%3Fid%3D432009&fname=journal.pone.0010875.PDF&pdf=true https://riviste.unimi.it/index.php/RIPS/article/view/5967
  3. Looking for information on my abelisaur tooth.

    So I bought one of those small abelisaur teeth that came from kem kem that everyone keeps falsely calling raptor teeth. Does anyone know any more information on it? Abelisaurs have small teeth compared to their heads so the creature probably wasn't too tiny. It's about 1.5 - 2cm with even serrations. As i understand it not much is known of this animal but anything you guys know would be appreciated! -Tom
  4. Hi guys, I've seen another 3 spinosaurus teeth form the same seller. What do you think about them? A) 120 [mm] weight: 88 [g] price: 232.93 [$] B ) 102 [mm] weight: 41 [g] price: 134 [$] C ) 143 [mm] price: 394 [$]
  5. Need ID on kemkem teeth

    Hello i have seen these teeth from kem kem in a fossil show and i was not able to know if it is pliosaur, pterosaur, fish ... ? Their size is from 2 to 4 CM. Thanks for your help
  6. Cetacean tooth?

    Hi folks Any idea on this tooth? Loos cetacean to me but wasn't aware cetaceans were found in Kem Kem.
  7. Echinodermata from Morocco ID help

    Hello guys, can someone help determining the genus and species of this Protasteridae from Kaid Rami, please? 4,2 cm maximum diameter, part and counterpart. Thanks in advance, Miguel
  8. Doubts in Moroccan Odontopleurida

    Good morning guys, Any thoughts about this Leonaspis' species, taking into account the newly described species? What's the most updated info about this genus in Moroccan lands, please? 2,0 cm Thanks in advance to all, Miguel
  9. Palaeocarcharodon orientalis (Sinzow 1899)

    From the album Pisces

    4cm. From the phosphate plateau in Khouribga, Morocco. Palaeocene.
  10. Kem Kem bone ID

    I know I should recognise this bone. I'm sure I've seen one just like it before, perhaps on this very forum, but an image search drew a blank. It's very distinctive. It has a completely flat, lobe shaped surface that it stands up on perfectly. 4.5cm long. Any pointers would be appreciated. Standing upon the flat surface: Flat surface sloping on the left:
  11. Adam's Cambrian

    A rangeomorph holdfast trace fossil from the Ediacara formation, Rawnsley quartzite of the Flinders Range, South Australia. This specimen is Medusina mawsoni, so called because it was until recently thought to be a jellyfish, but is now believed to be the attachment point of a fractal rangeomorph as Charniodiscus is the point of anchorage for Charnia sp. This one may have been the holdfast point for some species of Rangea. The diameter of the outer circle is 1.5 cm and the fossil is estimated to be 555 million years old.
  12. Hello. Just another mosasaur jaw thread! This one puzzles me a little. Obviously it has the replaced teeth, as usual. But it doesn't look right to me. For starters, all of those straight edges. It looks an awful lot like a composite. Almost like three or four chunks of jaw cobbled together with some random skull bones. Am I being paranoid, could these be natural breaks? My experience tells me that jaws don't break along these straight lines, but I thought I'd throw it out there to see what people think. Thanks for your help.
  13. Croc tooth (?) ID

    Hi guys going through my deep box of Kem Kem bits is this. I guess it’s croc, maybe Elosuchus? @Jesuslover340 @LordTrilobite @Troodon
  14. Moroccan Mosasaur teeth

    Recently collected a few mosasaur teeth near Bakrit Morocco late Cretaceous
  15. 4 Moroccan teeth

    Hi all, At the local market yesterday I bought these 4 teeth (in total for a very low price). All 4 are said to come from Morocco, but the seller didn't say the exact location. But I suppose that they are either from Kem Kem or Khouribga. Anyways I would just like your opinion on them (what species, 100% original or slightly reconstructed, anything I could do to "improve" them, etc). Thanks in advance! Best regards, Max Tooth #1: sold as a spinosaur tooth (so I suppose it's from Kem Kem).
  16. Good morning to everyone at TFF! In my box with Kem Kem fossils, I'm posting here 3 more mysterious fossils. Any help is welcome! My thanks to all who can help me! ============================================ ============================================ Bone Nº 01 Size: 26 mm ============================================ ============================================ Bone Nº 02 Size: 17 mm ============================================ ============================================ Bone Nº 03 Size: 23 mm @Troodon @LordTrilobite
  17. I picked this up for a few quid in a Spanish market from a Moroccan dealer, who usually sells good stuff, but I'm fairly certain it's a fake, it was too cheap, the colour's not quite right and i would say some of it has been carved and painted. It has a couple of bits of real Cambrian trilobite on the back and seems to have a bit of a Flexicalymene or the like glued on top to provide authenticity. What do you guys think?
  18. Kem Kem Bone

    Found this interesting little bone in among some scrap Kem Kem bones. At first the shape struck me as suggesting a digit of some sort, just wondered whether any further ID might be possible? (Or maybe its not a digit at all?)
  19. Good afternoon to all! Is this Trilobite Crotalocephalus Gibbus really real? From which part of Morocco is it discovered? What would be the Period, Era, and Millions of years?
  20. Trilobite and Crinoid Purchase

    Hello Fossil Forum! First time post but been a reader for a while now. I just got back from my honeymoon in Morocco and of course along the way stopped in Erfoud to look at fossils. We went specifically to Macro Fossiles Kasbah where they had a huge selection of fossils and fossils-turned-into-home-goods (sinks, table-tops, etc.). There were huge sheets of fossils, a cutting and polishing area, etc. It seemed legit and I was walking around with the owner for an hour, Raffa, whose dad had owned the place since the 70s. He was very enthusiastic when I showed interest and had a (very rough compared to this forum) knowledge of what we were looking at. At any rate, I picked up two pieces that I would love your opinions on. Both from a specific-identification perspective and a quality / validity perspective. Obviously we have one trilobite and one crinoid. From my eyes I can tell the Crinoid is a composite of what seems to be a few pieces with a bit of filler in there. Not ideal but I love that it's one animal in focus for a smaller piece like this. The stone you see is 14" tall. The spiny trilobite he kept in his office and only showed me after a longer conversation. I believe it to be real and a fairly good example considering its age. The stone you see is 10" tall. Would love opinions on specific species and thoughts on the prep quality. Plan on mounting these vertically in custom frames for a larger specimen wall and hope I made a couple wise purchases! Thanks in advance for your thoughts.
  21. Otodus obliquus

  22. This specimen caught my eye and I was wondering if the two trilobite were put together artificially? My second question is about the black color on these trilobites. I am not sure if they have shoe polish coating over them or the black color occurred naturally? I am still waiting for the seller to send me better close up pictures on the eye of Paralejurus, although it has nothing to do with the topic I will update the pictures when I get them. Of course any additional assessments on the fossil are greatly appreciated.
  23. Weird Kem Kem Vertebra

    I bought this vertebra a while back from our favourite auction site. Initially I bought it just because it looked like a nice vertebra, and I didn't think much of it. But when I had the real fossil in my hands I noticed that it's quite bizarre. I've never seen anything like it. So far everyone I've asked was stumped as well (though some suggested it might be croc). So I was wondering if someone here maybe had an idea. @Troodon maybe? It's a fairly nice centrum of a caudal vertebra, as the bottom does show some worn articulation surfaces for a chevron. And even though the neural arch is mostly missing, there doesn't seem to be an attachment for a lateral process. So I'm guessing it's pretty far down the tail of the animal. Though not as far down the tail since there is a chevron attachment. Now, there are mainly two weird aspects this vertebra has. For a caudal vertebra, the neural canal is really wide. The neural canal is also excavated a little into the centrum so that both the front and back of the centrum that gives it sort of "ears" on the top of the articulation surface. Then there is a kind of pinched area on the sides of the centrum. Looking at the sides of the centrum, the bottom middle is a lot wider than in the area dead centre. Here there the centrum is laterally pinched, making this area as thin as the neural canal is wide. So the centrum is maybe a centimeter thick in this area. Then immediately above it where a subtle shadow can be seen just below where the neural arch starts there is a wide horizontal bulge, making it the widest part of the vertebra right above the thinnest part. Any ideas?
  24. I got this jaw in the post today. It's 26 inches long, and seems to be the upper left jaw of a large-ish mosasaur, perhaps Prognathodon? The teeth don't provide much of a clue, since the crowns are, sorry to say, all added in afterwards. I knew this when I bought it, and I paid what I consider to be a fair price for a jaw of this size with botched-up teeth. My aim is ultimately to extract it, and mount it. At that point, I can sort the teeth out to a better standard, and replace the worst examples. I'm interested in any thoughts about the jaw in general - whether you see any obvious signs of tampering or anything unusual. I really wish people wouldn't interfere with these fossils to begin with! Thanks.
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