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Found 882 results

  1. Gift from Morocco!

    Got this from a friend awhile ago and forgot about it !
  2. Thoughts on these trilobites from Morocco found on our favorite auction site. Is there any restoration? Has any part been carved or painted? Any I do is greatly appreciated!
  3. Is this a fake Moroccan crocodile? Sorry for the bad pics it's at a fossil shop I can try and go back and get better once if people think they need ones that are better.
  4. Kem Kem bones

    Hello all, I got these two bones a couple of years ago. The biggest (first) one is 24 cm in lenght, the other one is 13 cm. I think the first one is from a crocodile? They are both repaired but not composited. I want to use them in my essay for school so I would really like to know what they are.
  5. What is this? Croc scute?

    Can anyone identify this for me? I would think it was a crocodile scute, except Ive never seen that shape before.
  6. I recently had the opportunity to obtain three specimens of the famous trilobite Cambropallas at a very low price. I've always wanted one of these; preferably a real one, although the fake/restored ones also interested me, if I could find one for the right price. So this was too good an opportunity to miss. Before I say anything else, I should say that I am a long way from being a trilobite expert. I only have half a dozen cheap examples in my collection, although I am interested in Moroccan fossils in general, and the repair/restoration/forgery that you often find in fossils from this country. I'll look at each of the three specimens in turn. If anybody has anything to add, or anything they wish to correct me upon, then please do! I apologise for any incorrect terminology or flat-out wrong information I may inadvertently give. Specimen A Matrix: 27cm This trilobite was complete and undamaged. At first glance, I thought the whole thing might be a cast, because it had an unreal orange hue. The photo below was taken after I had already rinsed a section near the head under the tap, to test my hypothesis that this was some form of pigment. It was, and it revealed the black surface seen towards the top. I decided to soak the whole block, and gently brush it with a toothbrush to remove all of the pigment, which came off easily. This was the result. Far from being faked, it appears to be approximately 65% original. Clearly, much of the right-hand side and the head shield was lost, presumably in a bad split. The missing pieces are constructed from an unknown substance, perhaps some kind of modelling clay (which is how I will refer to it for the sake of argument) or soft resin. It is soft when wet and can be cut away from the fossil with a sharp knife. I was interested to see that even those parts of the trilobite that are present are still covered in the modelling clay, presumably to smooth them out and improve the overall appearance - even though, in fact, it completely obscures all of the original detail. I don't doubt that virtually all of the left side of the thorax is present beneath the clay. I believe that this part of the trilobite is probably authentic: However, it may not be quite as simple as that, as the next specimen shows.
  7. Here we go, I finally got two nice Sinosauridae indet. teeth (long more or less 8-9 cm). I love the fact that one is pointy and not broken, while the bigger one has the typical ridges along the tooth. What do you think?
  8. Mini Mosasaur collection

    From the album Marine reptiles and mammals

    A little collection of assorted mosasaur fossils from 2 different places that I got when I first started collecting. 2 different types of vertebrae, one is mosasaur, and the other is a questionable claim of mosasaur, a corprolite that was claimed to be that of a mosasaur, a tooth, & 7 rib fragments. 2 ribs have predation marks, as well as the large vertebra. The large vert has a round tooth indent on the very center. The 2nd rib down has tooth scratches along the surfaces, & 3rd rib down has a round tooth indent in the center, which is probably what caused a strip across the middle to break off. There are 2 other tooth marks on that rib as well, forming a diagonal line from above left of the center indent, breaking off a piece along the top, to below right.
  9. Mosasaur premaxillary bones

    From the album Marine reptiles and mammals

    2 unidentified mosasaur species' anterior end of premaxillary bones. One with teeth broken off just beyond the skull, and the other has 2 remaining teeth, with the rest broken off at the level of the skull. the larger fossil was found in the phosphate mines of Khouribga, Morocco. ive since lost the information for the smaller fossil, sadly.
  10. Dinosaur claws from Kem Kem

    Hola amigos, estoy interesado en comprar algunas garras de dinosaurios de Kem kem. Te muestro las garras que me han ofrecido para que me digas a qué especies pertenecen y si las ves muy restauradas. Thank you so much. Translation Hello friends, I'm interested in buying some dinosaur claws from Kem kem. I show you the claws they have offered me to tell me what species they belong to and if you see them very restored. Thank you so much.
  11. This week's red flags This bone is being sold as a neural spine of a reptile or dinosaur. It's actually a pretty complete Chevron and could be dinosaurian. Needs lots of prepping to clean it up. Lots of Dromaeosaur raptor teeth being sold. All are either Abelisaurid indet or juvie Carcharodontosaurid Lots of caudal Vertebrae being sold as Spinosaurus or Carcharodontosaurus, most are Crocodyliforms, unknown or other Dino so post here before you buy Lots of rare phalanx toe bones from Dinosaurs or reptiles being sold this week. Most are Reptlian, Croc or turtle.
  12. Raptor

    From the album Dinosaurs & flying reptiles

    Unidentified raptor fossil, likely clavicle, from kem kem, in Taouz, Morocco middle Cretaceous 100 mya
  13. Cretaceous crocodile; likely Dyrosaurus

    From the album Marine reptiles and mammals

    Unidentified Cretaceous crocodile species, suggested by multiple people, to appear to be a Dyrosaurus, came from the second phosphatic layer of a phosphate mine(what a shocker!)around the suburbs of Khouribga, Morocco. Original teeth, not replacements. Have gone through and cleaned up the base of some of the ones that had some sand around them.
  14. Crocodile jaw

    i don't know much at all about Cretaceous crocodiles other than there were a ton of them. From what I hear, so many it's difficult to ID even if you have a good amount of an animals fossils, unless it's one of the number of very unique looking species that have a clear signiture. Sadly I'm guessing this fits into the former;difficult/near impossible to ID from just this. *Its a Cretaceous species, from the second phosphatic layer of the phosphate mines in the suburb of Khouribga, Morocco.
  15. Chenanisaurus barbaricus was described from the phosphate beds of the Ouled Abdoun basin of Morocco. Specifically the Holotype was found in Sidi Chennane couche ( bed ) III and all the teeth were Premaxillary however a isolated Maxillary tooth was found at Sidi Daoui. Family: Abelisauridae No formal formation designated, ( Late Maastrichtian ca. 112 Ma) Locality: Ouled Abdoun Basin, Couche III at Sidi Chennane Premaxillary Teeth: Tooth 1) CBR: .69, CHR: 2.14 Tooth 2) CBR: .76, CHR: 2.13 Mesial Density : 8.5 per 5 mm at tip and midline Mesial Density : 12 per 5 mm at base Distal Density : 8 per 5 mm at tip and midline Distal Density : 13 per 5 mm at base Denticles are Chisel shaped Carinae on both edges extend to the base Cross-section at base D shaped Longrich, N.R.; Pereda-Suberbiola, X.; Jalil, N.-E.; Khaldoune, F.; Jourani, E. (2017). "An abelisaurid from the latest Cretaceous (late Maastrichtian) of Morocco, North Africa". Cretaceous Research. doi:10.1016/j.cretres.2017.03.021 Lateral Teeth: CBR: ?, CHR: ? Mesial Density : 2 mm at tip and midline Mesial Density : higher at base Distal Density : 2 mm at tip and midline Distal Density : higher at base Denticles are Chisel shaped Carinae on both edges extend to the base Lateral Teeth compressed, blade like Mesial edge is strongly recurved Distal edge is straight Buffetaut, E., Escuillié, F., Pohl, B., 2005, "First theropod dinosaur from the Maastrichtian phosphates of Morocco", Kaupia 14: 3-8 Example of a couple in my collection
  16. I took delivery of this jaw today. I bought it over the weekend, having seen it and been offered a reasonable price on it. The initial pictures I saw were of very poor quality (the one above is mine), and it looked relatively convincing. In further photos, it also looked pretty convincing. The seller, I should point out, was not an expert or commercial seller, he was someone who'd bought it a few years ago and now wanted rid of it. Some of you are probably looking at the photo above and thinking to yourselves 'that's not at all convincing, what were you thinking?', and you'd be right to think that, since all of the teeth are fake (or rather, the roots are fake and the crowns were composited in). I've been collecting these jaws for several years, and I really should have known better. Dodgy photos or not, something doesn't look right about the alignment of the teeth or the shape of the roots. I let my enthusiasm get the better of me, as a result of which I splurged money I could ill-afford on something which is mostly faked. The jaw bone is entirely real, but there's not an awful lot of jaw to speak of. That said, it wasn't very expensive and is, if nothing else, an interesting piece of ethnographic art, and far better than those dismal $25 fakes that you see everywhere. One of the things that helped convince me was the tooth on the far left, which I felt looked quite realistic: The teeth on the right are less so, with roots which bulge in every direction, which appear to end at the point where they touch the matrix, and which in one area appear to be smudged on top of the jaw bone. They aren't the worst fakes I have ever seen, but they aren't great either. Up close they appear to be the usual mix of brown-ish plaster and sand. I post this as a warning, really. If you're ever unsure, post it here before buying, if only for a sanity check. You don't necessarily need to be a newbie to make a newbie error (although it helps if, like me, you're an idiot).
  17. The past few weeks at the Tucson Fossil I ran across a few fake Spinosaur claws but also was surprised how many good ones there were on the market. I also understand the issues with online claws so decided to put this topic out to help collectors gain a better understanding of them since they are very expensive. These are my opinions and welcome others since no one person as all the answers. There is no bullet proof approach you can take to insure you have a claw that is not totally fake or composited. There are some things you need to consider. - First try dealing with what I call preferred Moroccan merchants, those are typically found at big shows and a few have online or FB sites, ones that specialize in Moroccan material are the best. They typically know what to look for and can point out issues with claws. Makes life a bit harder to get one but you want a good claw don't you. This does not take you off the hook its still YOUR responsibility to know what you are buying. - Unless you are an expert never buy one from Auction site. If you see one that interest you see seek assistant from an expert, not a collector friend, or post it here on the forum we have lots of opinions here. - 2D photos are not always the best to see what is going on with a claw, I prefer handling one. Composited claws can be good and photos don't show you all the issues. - Good preservation and quality are key for making life easy in deciding if its a good claw or not. There is where it pays to focus on the better claws. Claws that are deformed, partial, compressed, beat up or have matrix on them are very difficult to insure you have a good one and especially hard for experts to positively say its good. It always best to save and wait to buy a higher end one. - As a general rule try avoid claws that have matrix glued on them or have seams with matrix. The matrix is there for only one reason to hid trouble. Matrix is a red flag, just tread carefully when looking at one of these. Ask yourself why risk it and buy a potentially problem claw, there are plenty out there that are clean. PRICE = Preservation (Quality) + Size - Repairs - Real claws are expensive, simple as that. Nice ones in the 6+ inch range can easily fetch over 1K depending on quality, 7+ inches can go over 10K . So if you see big claws under 1K there must be a reason unless its the deal of a century and they exist. Most of the claws I show are in the 1-2K range for 4-6 inches. Here are a few from the Tucson show to give you an understanding what real ones look like. Focus on shape, the articulation end, blood grooves and preservation. These two are clean no matrix, no compression may have been broken and reattached, reasonable preservation. Nice claws for any collection Higher Grade - Fatter, nice surface finish, good preservation, few if any repairs. Couple of more examples. Honest merchant shows, some repair and resto. Excellent high end claw around 7 inches very very expensive Fake Claws These two were laying in the box and the merchant said he just had them fabricated. They look pretty good to a novice both reasonable size and configuration. Probably copied from a good one. Red Flags : Check out the graining its does not follow the curve of the claw but is straight. Uniform Color and looks too clean. Finish is flat with no hit of sheen seen on bone. Super long ones are the most suspect, here are two in a box. Unusually long and thin, usually the dorsal curvature is not smooth to the tip has kinks, the preservation is odd, hard to see bone, lots of surface repairs. These may be composited, faked or combo? Who knows to risky to find out. Off an auction site - terrible fake easier to spot- 6.9 inch claw One of the hardest items to replicate is the blood groove that is on either side of the claw. The groove is the widest at the articulation end and slowly tapers to a point to form a channel at the tip that extends outward beyond the dorsal surface. Here is an example of a perfectly preserved one. Here is the tip of the claw from above and you can see the blood groove is just a channel in the claw. Another Characteristic on these claws is that when looked at from the top or bottom they are shaped like an isosceles triangle. Much bigger at the articulation end than the tip. Preservation may affect this but most should be tapered. Like most theropods, hand claws vary depending on digit so there will be variations depending on that and the number of different Spinosaurids that exist in Kem Kem. This is a big unknown and we believe these type of claws all belong to the Spinosaurid family. But here are a couple more you can check out the blood grooves, articulation and shape More Examples of Fake Hand Claws: Photo provided by Jim Kirkland Carved, Composited etc Badly carved claw
  18. I recently purchased this Kem Kem bone, described as dinosaur. The price was reasonable, so I took a chance on it. Can anybody more knowledgeable let me know what they think? I've been looking at examples of crocodile and theropod limb bones, and it's left me scratching my head a bit, I'm still none the wiser. It does need some prep, which I would have done before posting it, but it's been basically soaked in glue, so it'll need some careful applications of acetone to enable me to clean it up properly. There are three clearly repaired breaks, one of which - the one on the flatter (left) end - appears not to be original. I don't think those two bits of bone ever went together, or if they did, there was more bone originally between them. The narrowing of the bone seems too sudden to me. Any thoughts appreciated
  19. Hi all. I am currently looking for a genuine Basilosaurus tooth. Problem is, the market is too heavily saturated with other Archaeocetes like Dorudon or Zygorhiza. As far as I understand, if a tooth comes from Western Sahara of Morocco, and is over 10cm in length including root, there's a chance it could be cf. Basilosaurus isis. Here I have several candidates. Tooth A - 6 inches in length Tooth B - 5.5 inches in length Tooth C and D - 6 inches along the curve Is there any way I can positively ID out a Basilosaurus tooth? Do any of these 4 teeth look like one?
  20. A nice article about the history and evolution of the Moroccan trilobite industry. Don't miss the links at the bottom of the column that list Moroccan trilobites by geologic age. https://www.amnh.org/our-research/paleontology/paleontology-faq/trilobite-website/trilobite-localities/a-moroccan-trilobite-sojourn/ (Thanks to @Tidgy's Dad for kindly proofing the article and verifying that, overall, it is a fair representation of Morocco's trilobite industry. )
  21. Otodus obliquus tooth

    Hello everyone again! Here is also Otodus obliquus shark tooth that I have finished two months ago.I hope u will enjoy Darko
  22. Updated 11/7/17 Although a lot of this has already been posted on a number of topics, I thought consolidation it might prove useful with some additional information. If you're planning to purchase theropod teeth from Morocco's Kem Kem Beds or already have some in your collection check this out. Moroccan theropods are poorly understood and not a lot has been published. Very few articulated skeletons have been found and most are partial and without a skull. There is also lots of mis-information, mostly unintentional, from some dealers but especially online auction sites. Unfortunately these are the most misidentified commercially sold dinosaur fossil around. Please post your interest here on the forum before you buy. Background: The Kem Kem Beds also known as the ‘‘Continental Intercalaire’’ or "Continental Red Beds" is composed of three formations: Akrabou, Aoufous and Ifezouane Formation. The latter two are the dinosaur producing sediments with the Ifezouane being the principal one. They are Cenomanian in age. The attached drawing gives a representation how they lay. The distribution of the different groups of fossils in the Ifezouane Formation can been see in the pie chart below. Dinosaurs make up a small percentage of what is collected. So first lets identify what is known to the best of my knowledge. Theropods that have been described across North Africa (focus on large bodied theropods) Theropods that have been described in Kem Kem: (family level) Spinosaurus aegyptiacus * (Spinosaurid) *Some paleontologist believe this species is unique to Egypt and Kem Kem material should be identified as Spinosauid indet. Lots of questions exist over Ibrahim (2014) diagnosis which validated this species. Carcharodontosaurus saharicus (Carcharodontosaurid) Deltadromeus agilis (Neovenatorid) Sigilmassasaurus brevicollis (Spinosaurid) Sauroniops pachytholus (Carcharodontosaurid) Theropods that have not been described from the Kem Kem but isolated teeth exist and have been reflected in scientific papers: Dromaeosaurid sp.? Hendrickx suggested these are actually Noasaurid indet. Abelisaurid indet. Theropod teeth that are sold commercially but no scientific evidence yet to link them to the Kem Kem: Abelisaurus sp. (Not described from North Africa) Rugops sp. (Only described from Niger) Bahariasaurus sp. (Only described from Egypt) Elaphrosaurus sp. (From Jurassic of Tanzania) So what is being sold and what are the issues? Spinosaurid Teeth are well understood by both collector and dealers, see photo. Issues are typically associated with restoration and compositing a larger tooth from multiple teeth. Teeth with matrix attached to them are suspect for restoration so be careful. At least two species of Spinosaurids exits and it's currently impossible to determine if they are Spinosaurus or Sigilmassasaurus or Undescribed taxon. Conflicting taxonomic hypotheses have been proposed. Ibrahim at al (2014) suggest that all specimens found belong to Spinosaurus aegyptiacus. Evers et al (2015) regard Spinosaurus maroccanus and Sigiilmassaurus brevicollis as belonging to the same taxon Sigiilmassaurus brevicollis which is also supported by Hendrickx et al (2016). Ever at al (2015) also described additional specimens from a second unnamed Spinosaurid. Bottom line we do not have enough specimens to eliminate ontogenetic or sexual dimorphism differences and accurately describe Spinosaurids in the Kem Kem. So these teeth are best identified as: Spinosaurid indet. Carcharodontosaurid Teeth, those that are compressed and blade like, first photo. Wrinkles by the distal carina are diagnostic to this species. Mesial teeth are fat, slender and look very different (D shaped) (next three photos). Two species currently are described Carcharodontosaurus saharicus and Sauroniops pachytholus and its impossible to differentiate teeth between these taxons. Similiar to the Spinosaurid debate one exists with these two species and if Sauroniops is valid. Similiar to Spinosaurids the big issue is having enough specimens to make a proper determination in what exists.. For these reasons best identified as : Carcharodontosaurid indet. Theropod indet. There are also intermediate size teeth (1 1/2") that are being sold as Deltadromeus or another theropod. I believe these could be Deltadromeus teeth but until we see scientific evidence this morphology of tooth should be identified as Theropod indet. No skull was found with the holotype or in any other discoveries so we do not know what they look like. Carcharodontosaurid serrations Theropod indet. Dromaeosaurid: Teeth being sold as Dromaeosaurus are most likely misidentified, so here is what to look for. There are a few morphologies floating around but nothing as been formally described. Teeth are typically small around 1/2" (1.2cm) to over 1" (2.5cm) One morphology of these teeth are suggested by Hendrickx to be from a Noasaurid dinosaur. Although you see many sellers using the word Raptor next to what they are offering it's unknown if there is a true raptor in the Kem Kem. Abelisaurids are not raptors This figure identifies a study of isolated teeth by Richter (2015) and identifies two morphologies (A to D) and (E to G) as Dromaeosaurid. Mesial and distal carinae show a distinct density difference in serrations. The tip of the tooth extends past the base. On morph E/F a faint but visible constriction between crown and root is visible. The later form suggested by some paleontologists is most similiar to troodontids. Morph variant 3 that I have in my collection but not seen in any papers Mesial and distal carinae range show a distinct difference. A distinct twist to the mesial carina. Abelisaurid indet. With new discoveries we can put a real species name to these teeth but currently they are indeterminate. These are easily identifiable but can easily be misidentified with certain morphologies of Dromaeosaurid teeth. The teeth are very compressed, the cross-section is oval at the base, the mesial side is strongly curved and the distal side is almost straight to the base of the tooth, see red lines in the photo. Mesial and distal carinae range from only a slight to a distinct difference. The only morphological feature that discriminates a tooth of a dromaeosaurid from that of an abelisaurid is the unique mesial and distal curvature profile of the abelisaurid crown. These teeth could belong to Rugops since it's an Abelisaurid but we have no scientific information to support that claim and should be identified as Abelisaurid indet. Premaxillary Bottom Line: There are NO theropod teeth in the Kem Kem Beds that you can currently definitively assign to a Genus to, no less a Species all should be identified to a family level..
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