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Found 974 results

  1. Just wanted to share one of my favorite Moroccan trilobite plates. There are two trilobites on this plate and it came with both the positive and negative halfs. These are Cambropallas telesto from the Cambrian age. The actual trilobites measure 3.9 and 3.6 inches. They were found at Toughach, Alnif, Morocco. The plates were cracked but there is no restoration. Hope you enjoy.
  2. Rare Saw Shark From Morocco

    Hi everyone, I was hoping to gain more info about this saw shark on matrix from morocco. It is from a very reliable moroccan exporter who picked it up from quarry workers himself. 100% natural. I had never even heard of the existence of fossils of these before this. I'd love to hear about the rarity of specimens like this and if people are aware of value of these a PM would be much appreciated. Thanks for looking. Not really sure what sub forum to put this into. The white long bone is the bill of the shark with 1000s of teeth around it.
  3. WARNING! Fossil Exports from Morocco

    Well, i did hear a while ago that Morocco were thinking of becoming more serious on their 'cultural heritage' laws. I hope this is just an isolated case from the Spanish side and not the beginning of a trend. https://www.moroccoworldnews.com/2020/01/291089/spanish-airport-moroccan-fossils/
  4. 3 new fossils

    Hi I just got these today and would like to show them. If you need more photos just ask. Thank you and enjoy!! Hadrosaur. indet carpel Horseshoe canyon formation, Drumheller valley, Alberta, Canada.
  5. Hey guys These are my first founding in a phosphate mine near to where i live in morocco. this is my first post and am new to the Jurassic world.
  6. Goulmima teeth identification?

    Hi, i asked previously about a couple of Pliosaur teeth which i now have, but there are these two other teeth from the Goulmima site in Morocco that look quite different and i was wondering if they could be Polycotylid teeth or from some other marine reptile. The first tooth is 6.2cm (2.44 inch) and the other tooth is 4.1cm (1.6 inch). Is it possible to narrow these teeth down when the enamel looks worn?. Thanks.
  7. Hi all, i want to buy that Cambropallas Telesto. It seems a good specimen, i can see rock cracks passing thru the trilo so is a good sign. But i'm not sure about the entire specimen, in particular in the black areas in the back. Seems that the "shell" have been eroded. What do you think? Thank you
  8. My Oddball Kem Kem Theropod Teeth

    I know specimens from the Kem Kem are some of the most common things found on the market, but with so much undescribed material, it's a favourite location of mine for finding those fossils that are just a bit odd and often overlooked. So here are some of my theropod teeth from the locality to date, that don't quite fit the usual Spinosaurid & Carcharodontosaurid profiles: To start with, a theropod indet. tooth with a very unusual profile, and unique (for the locality) mesial carina that ends naturally above the midline.
  9. Updated 1/3/20 Although a lot of this has already been posted on a number of topics, I thought consolidation it might prove useful with some additional information. If you're planning to purchase theropod teeth from Morocco's Kem Kem Beds or already have some in your collection check this out. Moroccan theropods are poorly understood and not a lot has been published. Very few articulated skeletons have been found and most are partial and without a skull. There is also lots of mis-information, mostly unintentional, from some dealers but especially with online auction sites. Unfortunately these are the most misidentified commercially sold dinosaur fossil around. Please post your interest here on the forum before you buy. Background: The Kem Kem Beds also known as the ‘‘Continental Intercalaire’’ or "Continental Red Beds" are composed of three formations: Akrabou, Aoufous and Ifezouane Formation. The latter two are the dinosaur producing sediments with the Ifezouane being the principal one. They are Cenomanian in age. The attached drawing gives a representation how they lay. The distribution of the different groups of fossils in the Ifezouane Formation can been see in the pie chart below. Dinosaurs make up a small percentage of what is collected. So first lets identify what is known to the best of my knowledge. Theropods that have been described across North Africa (focus on large bodied theropods) Theropods that have been described in Kem Kem: (family level) Spinosaurus aegyptiacus * (Spinosauridae) *Some paleontologist believe this species is unique to Egypt and Kem Kem material should be identified as Spinosauid indet. Lots of questions exist over Ibrahim (2014) diagnosis which validated this species. >Carcharodontosaurus saharicus (Carcharodontosauridae) >Deltadromeus agilis (Neovenatoridae) >Sigilmassasaurus brevicollis (Spinosauridae) >Sauroniops pachytholus (Carcharodontosauridae) Theropods that have not been described from the Kem Kem but isolated teeth exist and have been reflected in scientific papers: >Dromaeosaurid sp.? Hendrickx suggested these are actually Noasaurid indet. >Abelisaurid indet. Theropod teeth that are sold commercially but no scientific evidence yet to link them to the Kem Kem: >Abelisaurus sp. (Not described from North Africa) >Rugops sp. (Only described from Niger) >Bahariasaurus sp. (Only described from Egypt) >Elaphrosaurus sp. (From Jurassic of Tanzania) So what is being sold and what are the issues? Spinosauridae Teeth are well understood by both collector and dealers, see photo. Issues are typically associated with restoration and compositing a larger tooth from multiple teeth. Teeth with matrix attached to them are suspect for restoration so be careful. At least two species of Spinosaurids exits and it's currently impossible to determine if they are Spinosaurus or Sigilmassasaurus or Undescribed taxon. Conflicting taxonomic hypotheses have been proposed. Ibrahim at al (2014) suggest that all specimens found belong to Spinosaurus aegyptiacus. Evers et al (2015) regard Spinosaurus maroccanus and Sigiilmassaurus brevicollis as belonging to the same taxon Sigiilmassaurus brevicollis which is also supported by Hendrickx et al (2016). Ever at al (2015) also described additional specimens from a second unnamed Spinosaurid. Bottom line we do not have enough specimens to eliminate ontogenetic or sexual dimorphism differences and accurately describe Spinosaurids in the Kem Kem. So these teeth are best identified as: Spinosaurid indet. Serrated : Spinosaurid teeth with a "beaded" carina. few examples of finely beaded teeth are popping up. Not sure we can currently say much about them if they are an evolutionary carryover on some teeth, an abberation in some jaws or a Baryonychinae type species. Carcharodontosauridae Teeth, those that are compressed and blade like, first photo. Wrinkles by the distal carina are diagnostic to this species. Mesial teeth are fat, slender and look very different (D shaped) (next three photos). Two species currently are described Carcharodontosaurus saharicus and Sauroniops pachytholus and its impossible to differentiate teeth between these taxons. Similiar to the Spinosaurid debate one exists with these two species and if Sauroniops is valid. Similiar to Spinosaurids the big issue is having enough specimens to make a proper determination in what exists.. For these reasons best identified as : Carcharodontosaurid indet. Lateral tooth Anterior Tooth Carcharodontosaurid indet Pre-Maxillary Tooth From the collection of @Omnomosaurus and identified by Christophe Hendrickx Serration Count: • Mesial: 12/5mm 8/5mm (closer to apex) • Distal: 9/5mm (just above midline) 7/5mm (closer to apex) CH: 34mm approx. CBL: 15mm CBW: 9.5mm CBR: .63 Key Features: Mesial carina ends mid-crown and is centrally placed. No marginal undulations present No transverse undulations present No longitudinal ridges present Weak short interdental sulci on one side of distal dentles at mid-crow Strongly displaced distal carina Braided enamel texture Photos by Omnomosaurus Theropod indet. There are also intermediate size teeth (1 1/2") that are being sold as Deltadromeus or another theropod. I believe these could be Deltadromeus teeth but until we see scientific evidence this morphology of tooth should be identified as Theropod indet. No skull was found with the holotype or in any other discoveries so we do not know what they look like. Carcharodontosaurid serrations Theropod indet. Dromaeosauridae: Teeth being sold as Dromaeosaurus are most likely misidentified, so here is what to look for. There are a few morphologies floating around but nothing as been formally described. Teeth are typically small around 1/2" (1.2cm) to over 1" (2.5cm) One morphology of these teeth are suggested by Hendrickx to be from a Noasaurid dinosaur. Although you see many sellers using the word Raptor next to what they are offering it's unknown if there is a true raptor in the Kem Kem. Abelisaurids are not raptors This figure identifies a study of isolated teeth by Richter (2015) and identifies two morphologies (A to D) and (E to G) as Dromaeosaurid. Mesial and distal carinae show a distinct density difference in serrations. The tip of the tooth extends past the base. On morph E/F a faint but visible constriction between crown and root is visible. The later form suggested by some paleontologists is most similiar to troodontids. Morph variant 3 that I have in my collection but not seen in any papers Mesial and distal carinae range show a distinct difference. A distinct twist to the mesial carina. Abelisaurid indet. With new discoveries we can put a real species name to these teeth but currently they are indeterminate. These are easily identifiable but can easily be misidentified with certain morphologies of Dromaeosaurid teeth. The teeth are very compressed, the cross-section is oval at the base, the mesial side is strongly curved and the distal side is almost straight to the base of the tooth, see red lines in the photo. These teeth could be similar to Rugops since it's an Abelisaurid but we have no scientific information to suggest that they are and should be identified as Abelisaurid indet. Premaxillary Bottom Line: There are NO theropod teeth in the Kem Kem Beds that you can currently definitively assign to a Genus, no less a Species, all should be identified to a family level..
  10. Moroccan echinoids

    I have these as Goniopygus menardi. These are from Morrocco. No stratigraphic info or specific location. Does that look correct? Scale in mm. I have these as Asterocidaris spines. Also from Morocco. Thanks for any help.
  11. I decided last week to keep an eye out for any of those elusive dromaeosaurid-like teeth from the Kem Kem....I think I got super lucky and found one within days!! The morphology doesn't match up with anything I'm familiar with from Morocco, so I'm thinking it fits quite nicely with the general appearance of a dromaeosaur tooth. Apologies for the quality of the photos. I've taken a lot of snaps, but just can't get any super clear shots. The tooth is 13.5mm in height. Tall and strongly laterally compressed, with a definite recurve. Please be my guest at trying to count the denticles; I've squinted and gone cross-eyed trying, but by my best count it's... Mesial midline: 8/9 per mm Distal midline: 5 per mm The mesial carina terminates approx. half way down the anterior edge, and has a very slight twist. You can see where the carina ends in the next photo, as the surface transitions to an almost flat, smooth triangular shape down to the base of the crown (shape reminds me of a tyrannosaurid split carina). Mesial: Distal: Cross-section is "figure-of-8" shaped: "Pinch" at base (present on both labial & lingual faces): Sorry again for the sharpness of the photos. My camera is a potato when it gets to macro photos.
  12. Anomalocaris Morocco ?

    Can it be a part of an anomalocaris? Ordovician, Fezouata Formation. Morocco Fossil Length 17 cm (7 inches)
  13. An interesting web page on fake trilobites. Fake Trilobites, American Museum of Natural History https://www.amnh.org/research/paleontology/collections/fossil-invertebrate-collection/trilobite-website/the-trilobite-files/fake-trilobites Yours, Paul H.
  14. Trilobite ID help

    Hello all, I bought this trilobite for my uncle for Christmas. It didn't come with any identification information, but I assume it is from Morocco. I was wondering if anyone could help me determine its name and age. Thanks for any help.
  15. Greetings, I recently bought a fossil vertebra from a moroccan seller who claimed it was a Plesiosaurus vertebra, and through I did not believe him I made a deal with him and I got the fossil for a cheap price. My guess it that it belongs to an Otodus chark or an Enchodus fish, is a quite big vertebrae anyway... What do you think? Thank you very much in advance.
  16. Serrated Spinosaurid Tooth - Kem Kem

    I've spoken to Troodon a little elsewhere on the forum regarding this serrated Spino tooth; my main question is regarding the root - can anyone verify whether the root looks to originally be from this tooth? It's obviously been reattached, but sand has been used to fill a gap between the crown & root, which makes me wonder a little. For anyone wanting wider details around this little oddball: • Length approx 48mm long (including the root) • Very slightly recurved • Mesial carina naturally terminates at the midline • Denticles appear to be 2/mm on both carinae • Veiny enamel texture • Extremely minor fluting on one side The Interesting Features: Mesial Margin: Distal Margin: Enamel Texture: Apologies for the godawful photos. (I definitely need to get a better microscope for this stuff!)
  17. Moroccan Mosasaurs

    hy mosasaurs lovers i looked around on differents americans fossils web sites , and i found ,is nowhere a description or list about different species of mosasaurs from morocco . so I'll try humbly to fix it . feel free to correct me if you see something wrong. the moroccan phosphate history began in 1921 , Moroccan phosphate mines operate three layers of phosphates ,. level 1 : ypresian phosphate bed level 2 : thanetian phosphate bed level 3 ; maestrichian phosphate bed level 4 ; maestrichian grey phosphate only at sidi-chenan quarry most of the material on a market belong to oued zem and sidi -daoui zone , even you will finding them under khouribga denomination, nothing come from khouribga... of courses , mosasaurs belong to the level 3.and 4 different species are studied by scientists of the French Museum of Natural History in Paris . today the last record of different mosasaurs species is at list 18 and probably 20. (personal opinion ) listed like below : †Halisaurus. arambourgi .(Bardet, Pereda Suberbiola, Iarochène, Bouya & Amaghzaz, 2005) †Halisaurus.sp not described yet †Halisaurus walkeri .(Lingham-Solier, 1998) ( i used this name temporarily, until one studie about this mosasaur show-up ) †Prognathodon sp Dollo, 1889 †Prognathodon anceps ex leiodon anceps slender form massive form perhaps sexual dimorphism ( personal opinion ) †Prognathodon solvayi Dollo, 1889 †prognathodon hudae kaddumi 2009 †Prognathodon. currii (Christiansen & Bonde, 2002) †Eremiasaurus heterodontus , gen. et sp. nov sp ( AR. H. LeBlanc, M. W. Caldwell, and N. Bardet. 2012) †“Mosasaurus" baugei Arambourg 1954 ( Mosasaurus beaugei Arambourg, 1952 (Squamata, Mosasauridae) from the Late Cretaceous phosphates of Morocco Nathalie Bardet , Xabier Pereda Suberbiola , Mohamed Iarochene , Fatima Bouyahyaoui , Baadi Bouya , Mbarek Amaghzaz . 2004 ) †Mosasaurus hoffmanni Mantell, 1829 †Tylosaurus Marsh, 1872 slender form long premaxillary like tylosaurus proriger massive form short premaxillary like hainosaurus personal constatation †Platecarpus ptychodon Arambourg 1954 †Globidens. phosphaticus (Bardet, Pereda Suberbiola, Iarochène, Amalik & Bouya, 2005) †carinodens belgicus ( N. Bardet, X. Pereda Suberbiola, M. Iarochène, M. Amalik, and B. Bouya. 2005) †carinodens minalmamar. (A.S. Schulp, N. Bardet& B. Bouya. 2009) †harranasaurus khuludae. (kaddumi.2009) †Globidens simplex(LeBlanc, Aaron. (2019)
  18. Carcharodontosaurid foot claw?

    Hi, I saw this large 8.9cm (3.5 inch) Kem Kem claw for sale. It is labelled as a Carcharodontosaurus (or Carcharodontosaurid) foot claw. I wanted to ask if the identification looks likely - i don't believe it is Spinosaurid and not sure of other large theropods the claw could be from. I should also ask if it looks genuine - the seller states that there are a few breaks but no restoration done on it. Thank you.
  19. Kem Kem bones thread

    Hello everybody, this is all my new bones from morocco, i need many precision on it, if you could. I know they are few publication of Kem Kem but you coule maybe help me. Firstly, i have those two vert, i don’t have idea for the identification. The smallest is clearly a reconstruction, perhaps with a piece of rib.
  20. @hxmendoza is one of the foremost dinosaur claw experts I know. I spoke to him several days ago about the "typical" dinosaur claw we see from Kem Kem. He pointed out something interesting. Let me know your thoughts!
  21. I present this here large asaphus trilobite, besides being repaired how much if composited/fake is this trilobite?
  22. Fossil Bone?

    Hi All, I'm wondering if you could help me identify this item? I think it's a fossil bone, but I just don't know. I found it lying on the surface where I was camped for the night by the Kem Kem beds. The reason we were camped was to visit the Spinosaurus dig site that was featured in the National Geographic Documentary, Bigger than T. Rex. I can provide the long and lat, for the exact location. The surface it was on was rock strewn, so it was a chance find amidst many rocks. About 8-10 metres from a dry stream edge, not an obvious exposure or deposit from running water. The item had no part of it buried. A link to the full resolution version of images is here, I'll leave the link active for 6 months. https://1drv.ms/u/s!AutS1HGsNzVXi-8IRNetXsI3rwZA4Q?e=C3cqMg My feeling is that if it is a bone, that it may be spinal, with the hole through it as a major conduit for a nerve, or possibly a blood vessel. But really I have no idea, and that's why I'm posting to gain your expertise! Many thanks for your time. Phil
  23. Trilobite ID

    Hey everyone, I just received this fossil from a friend and was wondering if anybody could help me properly ID it. Thanks!
  24. Kem Kem Leptostyrax macrorhiza

    From the album Cretaceous Shark Teeth

    Very rare Leptostyrax from the Kem Kem beds of Morocco. Lower Upper-Cenomanian in age.
  25. Hematite Ammonites from Morocco

    The label supplied with these says they are from the Cretaceous, from the Atlas Mountains in Morocco. They appear to be preserved with Hematite. The squares are 0.5"x0.5" (roughly 1.3cm²). If more pics are needed for an Id I'll get them for you.
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