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Found 300 results

  1. Hi, I've just got back from a collecting trip up to Hamstead Ledge this afternoon and came across a fairly rare find that I was hoping someone may be able to help with. It's the distal tarsometatarsus of bird found ex-situ on the foreshore. Bird material from the Bouldnor Fm. tends to be quite rare and this is the first piece I've actually ever come across so was really excited to find it! I was wondering if there were any diagnostic features on the specimen that would be able to take the ID further than "Aves indet.". If anyone has any knowledge of bird material then I'd really appreciate their help (what I have noticed is the trochlea are fairly evenly spaced but didn't know if that indicated anything). Thank you, Theo The specimen measures 1.9cm in length and 1.5cm across at it's widest point.
  2. Snakewood

    Hi all, here is a piece of snakewood (Menningoxylon) I found in a river, from the Whitsett Formation-Oligocene exposed, aprox. 34-35 million years old. It is completely opalized. Order: Caryophyllales Genus: Mennegoxylon (unranked): Angiosperms Kingdom: Plantae For your viewing pleasure.
  3. Hi, It's been a while since I've put anything up on here so it figured it would a good time to share some of my finds from this spring so far. With such a productive winter the start of this spring on the Bouldnor Fm. coast was a bit slow with several trips in which little was found (odd for what is usually a heavily productive site) but as March and April came round the finds started coming in faster and better. Access at Bouldnor is now very dangerous and pretty much impassable due to thick and deep silt and mud which has covered part of the beach (which I found out the hard way trying to get through), along with two recent cliff falls which have brought several oak trees down onto the beach. Hamstead and Cranmore are as good as ever with a lot of the winter's mudflows now eroding away and making the foreshore a lot easier. (Hamstead Ledge on a spring low tide) Mammal finds have been pretty nice so far this spring, as usual all Bothriodon, and alongside them I've also made some nice alligator and turtle finds including two partial Emys in-situ in the Upper Hamstead Mbr. Here are some of the highlights: 1. More pieces of the large Bothriodon mandible I first found in January have turned up scattered over the same area. I now have part of the hinge, two sections with P2 - M3 and a part of the underside of the mandible from further forward. I regularly check the site on my collecting trips so hopefully yet more of the jaw will turn up. (The positions of the fragments may be slightly off in the image below but it gives a general idea) 2. Bothriodon caudal vertebra. This is one of my favourite finds from this spring. I was originally excavating a small micro-vertebrate site when I felt the tool make contact with a large bone, I dug a bit deeper into the clay and found this vertebra with the processes fragmented around it. Luckily with a bit of super glue the processes were easily reunited with the vertebral body, after 33 million years apart. Unfortunately I couldn't locate the other transverse process or neural spine in the matrix nearby so I think they may have been broken off on the Oligocene coastal plain. 3. Bothriodon upper molar in a fragment of maxilla 4. Section of Bothriodon mandible with a nice mental foramen. Unfortunately no in-situ teeth with this one. 5. Section of mammalian limb bone with evidence of rodent gnawing. This was an in-situ find eroding out of the Upper Hamstead Mbr. on the foreshore. Gnaw marks like these are really common on in-situ material especially on limb bones. I don't think the rodents were scavenging the flesh off the bones, more likely they were extracting calcium and phosphate or were simply using it to grind down their continually growing incisors. Either way it shows that for at least a period a lot of these bones were exposed to the elements and accessible to the variety of rodents present on the coastal plain. 6. Nice quality Bothriodon intermedial phalange 7. Large Diplocynodon alligator frontal bone Thanks for reading, and I hope you enjoyed the finds! Theo
  4. Hi! I’m a newbie in every sense of the word. Zero background with fossils but interest in rocks. Two days ago, while hiking Heil Ranch in Boulder, a turqouise blue glimmer caught my eye so I picked it up. When I got home I took these photos. It looks like a small egg shaped rock with a little lizard shape in it. There is even a little ridge that looks like a spine. My son says it’s just a rock, and I’m sure he’s correct, but thought I’d get confirmation from the experts. Thanks in advance for your time, and for humouring me with my silly request.
  5. Desmostylian Size

    Hello together. I just started to take a look at Desmostylia, as they still miss in my marine tetrapod collection (of more or less selfmade models) I read in several derivative descriptions that the biggest species (without a name being mentioned) where similar in size to stellers seacow, i.e. 7-9 meters. I believe that goes back to an article by Nicholas D. Pyenson and Geerat J. Vermeij where marine top feeders are compared by skull size. As Stellers seacow has an exceptionally small head for its size I wonder if that comparison makes sense? I´d appreciate any information on bigger desmostylians and up to date reconstructions of their posture and locomotion. Thanks in advance Jan
  6. My 18 year old son and I went on our 1st ever fossil hunt and were very succesful, at least we think so. We didn't find anything in the locations that were mentioned as being fossil rich but after looking around outcroppings and riverbeds for hours with nothing to our name, we decided to go for a walk before heading back to Washington, while hoping it might still produce something. By now we had become 'seasoned' in finding outcroppings that might contain fossils of course. We are fast learners. ;-) And yes, not too far into our walk we came across something that looked like an outcropping. Sure enough.. we found many 'blocks' as seen on the pictures. These blocks were all over the place at the bottom of the outcropping. We only spend a little time there because it was late in the day and took about 5 with us but there were many more. I am sure it must be spot that not many people know of unlike all the other sites that had nothing. We will head back when weather is sunnier. I was surprised to see that there are many pieces of shells on some of these. My understanding is that these fossils belong to the Oligocene age but in all honesty I am not sure. I am a novice for sure but plan to learn and hope to find out. I am considering if I should break some blocks open to see if I can find more fossils inside but I will 1st do some research and decide based upon that.
  7. Fossilized Tusk or Dugong Bone?

    It has been forever since I have posted on here, but I need help Identifying an unknown fossil. This fossil was found around Charleston, South Carolina along with many Angustidens and other shark teeth. This fossil appears to be approximately 4.5 inches from tip to base. I believe this fossil comes from the Oligocene epoch. Please check out the very center and the growth rings. Thank you very much for the help! I am identifying this fossil for a friend and the fossil is currently located in Charleston, SC, so I am not able to take more pictures of it.
  8. Eumys (Myomorpha, Oligocene)

    Looking for second opinions, confirmation, or correction on this jaw from the White River Group, Oligocene, Nebraska. These last few posts represent my first "go around" with rodent teeth. I have this one as Myomorpha cf. Eumys elegans. Of the teeth listed in "The Mammalian Fauna of the White River Oligocene: Part II. Rodentia" by Scott et al. 1937, this seemed like the best match. An old publication, but I see that this taxon is still valid. I'm sure new species have been discovered. Here is the jaw. Scale in mm. Close up of occlusal surface not to scale.
  9. Palaeolagus? (Oligocene: Lagomorpha)

    Looking for confirmation or correction on this jaw fragment from the White River Group (Oligocene) of Nebraska. I have it as a Lagomorph cf. Palaeolagus. Scale is in mm. (Occlusal view on lower right is enlarged and not to scale).
  10. Ischyromys? (rodentia)

    I am looking for confirmation of the identity of this rodent jaw from the White River Group of NW Nebraska. I am thinking Ischyromys. Thoughts? Scale is mm. Occlusal view enlarged and not to scale. @jpc, @Fruitbat, @Nimravis
  11. Leptomeryx (Oligocene Mammalia)

    I'm looking for confirmation on this. I think it is Leptomeryx. The two occlusal views are the same but with different lighting. The other photos are labial and lingual views of the jaw. White River Group. Oligocene. Nebraska. Scale in cm/mm. Occlusal view not to scale. @Harry Pristis, @jpc, @Nimravis
  12. Turtle Caudal Vertebrae?

    Dear TFF members, I am seeking confirmation of the class and order of vertebrate to which these vertebrae belong. This is a ventral view. I am thinking turtle caudal vertebrae. White River Group. Nebraska. Oligocene. Scale in cm/mm
  13. Carcharocles angustidens 15

    From the album Sharks and their prey ....

    Carcharocles angustidens South Carolina Chandler Bridge fm.

    © Matthew Brett Rutland

  14. Hi, Bit of a geological question here, I recently took this photo of some of the Upper Hamstead Member strata exposed on a headland at Bouldnor Cliff whilst out collecting. I really like this spot as the colour variation in the beds is really interesting. I've heard that the colour mottling in mudstones such as these can be indicative of the paleo-environmental conditions they were deposited in. Generally speaking these muds were deposited in ponds, lakes, and sluggish waterways on a low lying coastal plain. However, would it be correct to presume the redder areas indicate more arid conditions i.e. a period when the Hampshire Basin coastal plain was very dry and the other green and grey beds periods in which the environment on the plain was wetter? Thank you, Theo
  15. Last Friday I went with a group of people to a local North Carolina Oligocene Quarry. This quarry contains exposures of the late Oligocene Belgrade Formation; Pollocksville and Haywood Creek members along with the early Oligocene river Bend Formation. These are all in situ pictures. The drive in .... These piles are mostly Pollocksville member, but there is some Haywood Creek member of the Belgrade mixed in. There is also a pebble lag that has Pleistocene and Pliocene fossils. First find of the day was this nice little croc tooth, Thecachampsa sp. A little later I found this nice cowshark tooth, Notorhynchus cf. primigenius and this nice little croc vert .....
  16. A new mysticete-related paper is available online: Hernández Cisneros, Atzcalli Ehécatl. 2018. A new group of late Oligocene mysticetes from México. Palaeontologia Electronica 21.1.7A 1-30. https://doi.org/10.26879/746 palaeo-electronica.org/content/2018/2147-oligocene-mysticetes-from-mexico The discovery of Tlaxcallicetus represents the second named species of Oligocene chaeomysticete from the eastern Pacific and only the third named species of Paleogene mysticete from that region, the other being the late Eocene Mystacodon from Peru. Thanks to the discovery of Sitsqwayk from Washington State, Tlaxcallicetus shows how much more is to be learned about early chaeomysticete diversity in the Pacific because the vast majority of Pacific chaeomysticetes from the Oligocene have been found in New Zealand (it's possible that there may be an undescribed Oligocene mysticete fossil in museum collections in California, or mysticetes preferred pelagic habitats in California in contrast to the Pyramid Hill odontocetes).
  17. Big Miocene/Oligocene Mammal Jaw????

    I bought this jaw at a fossil show and the only info that came with it was "Badlands USA". The matrix looks Miocene Arikaree to me and not Oligocene but I'm not sure of course. Any information from a mammal/tooth collector will be appreciated. I have an idea of what it might be but I don't want to say anything until I hear from you all. Thanks, Mikey
  18. Mole Tooth Fragment

    Fragment of M3 from a talpid (cf. Myxomygale sp.) collected through screen washing of matrix from the White Band.
  19. Hi, I recently finished processing 4kg of matrix from a horizon in the Upper Hamstead Mbr. of the Bouldnor Fm. from Bouldnor Cliff and thought I'd share the results! The White Band is definitely the most diverse vertebrate fauna I've collected so far in my short time screen washing, with at least 2/3 genera of fish, 2 genera of reptiles, and 2 genera of mammals, it also has some interesting taphonomy. The White Band refers to a thick Polymesoda shell bed in the Upper Hamstead Mbr. and dates to approximately 33 million years bp during the Rupelian. The Upper Hamstead Member is the youngest strata in the entire paleogene sequence of the Hampshire Basin (Late Palaeocene to Early Oligocene). The horizon was deposited in a shallow freshwater lacustrine environment on the low-lying Solent Group coastal plain of the southern Hampshire Basin. By the time the White Band was deposited average annual temperatures in the region were beginning to warm up again after the sudden and rapid cooling that marked the Eocene-Oligocene transition. Global sea levels were also beginning to rise. The Grande Coupure, the large scale turnover of European mammalian faunas had been and gone, and the endemic Eocene groups such as Palaeotheres, Omomyid primates, and anoplotheres had long vanished. The lake/pond system that deposited the White Band was home to aquatic plants such as Stratiotes and was fringed by patches of open woodlands of Sequoia, Pine, and broadleaf. With the post-grande coupure fauna now established the landscape was home to anthracotheres, hornless rhinos, hyaenodonts, bear-dogs, entelodonts, primitive ruminants, choeropotamids, and a myriad of smaller mammals including bats, adapid primates, rodents, insectivores, marsupials, and the otter-like pantolestids. Not to mention the alligators, birds, and freshwater turtles. 1. Worn fragment of Emys carapace 2. Possible fragment of crocodilian osteoderm? 3. Fragment of Bowfin skull bone 4. Isoptychus sp. cheek tooth. Theridomyid rodents like Isoptychus are the most commonly found micro-mammal throughout the entire Solent Group. This molar has been heavily worn which may suggest an older individual. Theridomyids were bipedal and foraged along the ground and in low trees. They also seem to have fed on the seeds of marginal aquatic plants such as Stratiotes, which may be the reason this individual was in the vicinity of the pond/lake. The Theridomyids were one of only a few Eocene mammal groups to survive the Grande Coupure and seemed to have survived fairly unscathed in terms of diversity etc. showing what hardy and adaptable rodents they probably were. 5. Fragment of M3 from a talpid, most likely Myxomygale sp. (just 1.5mm long!). Talpids (or as we call them today, Moles) were newcomers to Europe with the Grande-Coupure, arriving from Asia. Belonging to the tribe Urotrichini (Shrew-Moles) which are only found in North America and Asia today, Myxomygale may have spent most of the day underground in burrows before emerging at night to feed on invertebrates. Modern Shrew-Moles prefer moist habitats such as swampy areas, a habitat which was abundant on the low-lying coastal plain of the Oligocene Isle Of Wight. The taphonomy of the White Band is also interesting. Some specimens i.e. the Emys fragment and osteoderm are highly 'polished' and worn, suggesting transport prior to deposition. Whereas others such as the mammals and most fish material I've recovered are unworn and 'fresh' looking. I'm not sure what conditions could have caused this, and if anyone has any suggestions I'd be really interested. My take is that the mammals and fish were likely living in the immediate area, in and around the lake/pond, whereas the polished material is from animals living some distance away brought to the pond/lake by floods or streams etc. although I'm no trained geologist or palaeontologist. Thanks for reading, Theo
  20. Anthracothere Mandible

    Partial crushed left mandible from the anthracothere Bothriodon collected from the Bouldnor Formation in two pieces. The first collected ex-situ on the 29/01/18, and the second on 13/02/18. P2 to M3 in-situ. P1 and M2 missing.
  21. From the album Vertebrates

    Aeoliscus longispinus (Rozhdestvensky, 1949) Oligocene Menilite shale Carpathians Jamna Dolna Poland
  22. Hi, I thought I'd share some of my best finds from what has been a brilliant start to collecting in 2018! The Isle Of Wight has been hit by heavy storms, with torrential rain and gale force winds, numerous times over the last month or so. This has caused some serious erosion and slipping to the soft clay cliffs and foreshore of the Bouldnor Fm. and the coast has been highly productive. I've made some of the best finds of my fossil hunting "career" (if that's the right term for it), including some very nice large mammal finds that I have dreamed of coming across for a while now. 1. The partial cranium of a mammal. This is without a doubt one of my best finds. I collected it ex-situ from the foreshore and at first thought I was looking at a large piece of fossil wood, which are common in some of the fluvial and freshwater horizons of the Lower Hamstead Member. Luckily I spotted the cancellous bone texture, and quickly realised it was a large piece of mammal skull. The cranium is essentially the left portion of the brain case with the parietal bone, part of the frontal bone, jaw articulation surfaces and saggital crest with scars from the temporalis muscle. The brain case is filled with sediment and Viviparus gastropods, which may be the culprits for the extensive mollusc bore marks on the parietal bone. There is also a Stratiotes seed in one of the gastropod shells indicating the skull was deposited in a shallow (less than 6.5m deep) freshwater pool, probably already broken. Skulls like this are incredibly rare, and I've heard that it looks like it was probably out on the shore for just a couple of hours! As usual with my big or unusual finds I took it straight in to Dinosaur Isle Museum where it's currently on loan for preparation and identification in case it's an important find. I believe it may be something like an Anoplotherium although I'm not sure. 2. Partial Bothriodon mandible. This is a really cool find that I've always wanted to come across! Bothriodon is an abundant part of the Post-Grande Coupure mammal fauna, arriving in Europe and Britain around 33.6 million years ago from Asia. This was facilitated by the Oi-1 glaciation event in Antartica lowering global sea levels and opening up several migration routes from Asia into Europe for a myriad of immigrant taxa. The habitat of the early Oligocene Hampshire Basin was ideal for the proposed lifestyles of anthracotheres (low lying coastal plain with wetlands, lakes, and open woodland), which along with a preservation bias, makes Bothriodon the most common large mammal encountered. I found this jaw in two pieces, 14 days apart and 5m from each other in a mudflat at low tide. The bone is heavily crushed and has P2 - M3 in-situ, although P1 is missing (possibly pre-fossilisation) and I still haven't found the other jaw section with the M2 (fingers crossed it'll turn up one of these days!). I think the jaw washed out of the Upper Hamstead Member during this winter's storms and smashed into several pieces which were subsequently scattered over the immediate area. (P1 to M1 section found 14 days after the M3)
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