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Found 272 results

  1. So today I was excited when this book came in. It is not in print anymore and I was lucky I managed to order this copy. It talks about the gastropods, cephalopods, and vermes of the Georgian Bay formation of Toronto, Ontario. It even has some nice detailed plates of what can be found in the formation. I never even knew vermes (worms?) can be found in the formation.
  2. Hungry Hollow fossils

    Hi everyone! I'm finally starting to go through some of the things that Viola and I found when we visited Hungry Hollow back in April in preparation of doing a trade, and I was looking for some help with identifying the following items: Item #1, front and back: A tabulate coral perhaps? I think I can see corallites in the "back" photo... (or maybe a bryozoan...) Item #2, front and back: Another tabulate coral? (or perhaps another bryozoan...) Item #3, front and back: A bryozoan? This one looks different - it kind of looks like frilly layers... Thanks in advance! I may end up posting more stuff so keep an eye out for more requests for help!!! Monica
  3. Well, since moving to Ottawa, I haven't had the chance to go out fossil hunting. There wasn't a whole lot of info on the web about the geology here. So my wife and I decided to buckle up and find a spot ourselves (without any hammers or chisels). We tend to be very lucky people, but I was surprised by the THOUSANDS of trilobites we came across in a matter of 20 minutes. We were on the shoreline of the Ottawa river, we found a certain type of shale that was just crawling with them. If any lucky soul goes to the spot where we left all the remnants of our hunt, they will sure be having a good day. I'm especially excited that I was able to find trilos. Coming from Kansas, we don't really have them (although I've found a few). I'm excited to traverse the Canadian wilderness collecting fossils and upsetting my wife with all of the rocks I bring home. None of the bugs we found were complete, although we did our darnedest to find some. But here are a few pictures of our trip! (This is an extremely small fraction of what we found) What a beautiful time immersing ourselves inthe beauty of mother earth. Cheers! Dylan http://cubeupload.com/im/p9S7Pq.jpg http://cubeupload.com/im/fK7zCw.jpg http://cubeupload.com/im/FEPxWk.jpg http://cubeupload.com/im/oe0G9h.jpg http://cubeupload.com/im/UkGZgh.jpg http://cubeupload.com/im/XM2CcW.jpg http://cubeupload.com/im/CYZbv7.jpg http://cubeupload.com/im/uCxGoB.jpg http://cubeupload.com/im/hdg0G2.jpg http://cubeupload.com/im/hQhHyo.jpg http://cubeupload.com/im/EbMeHi.jpg http://cubeupload.com/im/HcPfNe.jpg http://cubeupload.com/im/m1mxaX.jpg http://cubeupload.com/im/MvHYCg.jpg http://cubeupload.com/im/ckSAYq.jpg http://cubeupload.com/im/cFeL7a.jpg http://cubeupload.com/im/xGyceQ.jpg http://cubeupload.com/im/9E62H7.jpg
  4. The missus had an errand to run and asked if I'd like to be dropped off at Arkona for a few hours. Of course, I never turn down an opportunity to get out and collect! It started drizzling, and then pouring. I was still adamant on going, and glad I did. Planning around the weather this year in SW Ontario seems an exercise in futility, as it has been a largely wet and unpredictable season as opposed to more even keel prior years. One of the slim advantages of going to Arkona in the rain is that you can actually see things much better when the ground is wet. As I was going in to the south pit, some intrepid fossil collectors were on their way out, soaked to the skin. They had had enough. They probably thought me foolish for thinking of going down there. And it was indeed mucky. At one point, with the accumulated sticky Arkona clay under my boots, I briefly experienced what life would be like four inches taller. The rains varied in intensity, from a mild drizzle to a somewhat frustrating downpour. Undaunted, I was going to make the most of my two precious hours even as I felt a whole lot heavier being soaked through, runnels and rivulets of rain running roughshod over my ragged mien - lol. I was not gunning for my usual fare this day given the short amount of time and the weather conditions, so it was more about casual surface collecting in the south pit. And so poking through the Arkona clay, I figured I'd beef up my goniatite collection. Here is a row of them in ascending order of size. I am actually quite surprised and proud to have found a fairly large one in this formation, as those generally are nested in the matrix of the Widder Fm above:
  5. I feel like I'm behind this but is it true that what was called the Whitby formation in southwestern Ontario is now called the Blue Mountain formation? Does anyone know the real story behind what happened officially?
  6. Hello, New to the forum and collecting fossils in general. Went to my moms house and mentioned that I had been fossil hunting and she says "I have found some fossils before." and she pulls out this giant worm like thing. This was found in Port Hope Ontario possibly up to 25 years ago. I have included both a wet and dry picture. The fossil seems to have a dark red tinge to it. Also the back had a ton of fossils on it I have attached a picture of the back as well. Any help with an identification would be much appreciated. Thanks Folks and happy hunting:)
  7. Brampton, Caledon, Georgetown Fossil Sites

    Hello! I am in Brampton and need some direction on where I can go to do some fun hunting. anything in the Caledon, Georgetown, Brampton areas? or within 45 mins of these areas? not concerned with what type of fossils. just love finding history! thanks so much!!! - also - are there any groups that get together in these areas? trips? clubs ect?
  8. Cephalopods?

    Hey!! Are these cephalopods? More specifically Dawsonoceras? Found in Vaughn Ontario near a stormwater pond - I have a feeling it's from a local quary since this pond is a man made structure. TIA!!
  9. The weekend of June 24th and 25th I participated in an outing with the New York Paleontological Society led by my friend, Ray McKinney to Brechin, Ontario. TFF Member Malcolm led our group into the James Dick quarry where both Bobycaygeon and Verulam Formations are exposed. These are Middle Ordovician from the Trenton Group and contain a wide variety of invertebrate fossil fauna. Also met other TFF members Kevin (Northern Sharks) and Joe (crinus). Most of the quarry is the Bobycaygeon and the very top is the Verulam- only accessible near the entrance, but I got some excellent well preserved matrix plates from there. I spent the second day combing the spoil piles. This first picture is Lake Simco by Beaverton where we stayed. Malcolm in the middle, explaining the quarry geology to NY Paleontological Society members.
  10. Favistella alveolata

    From the album Georgian Bay Formation (Upper Member) Outside of Toronto, Ontario

    Favistella alveolata (Goldfuss, 1826) Found as a loose specimen at an exposure at the Credit River on Streetsville, Mississauga, Ontario. Late Ordovician, Georgian Bay formation. A rugose colonial coral. Coral approximately 10 cm excluding extra matrix.
  11. Homotrypa sp. (streetsvillensis?)

    From the album Georgian Bay Formation (Upper Member) Outside of Toronto, Ontario

    Homotrypa sp. (streetsvillensis?, Dyer, 1925) Georgian Bay formation, late Ordovician. Plate of unidentifiable bryozoa. Found as a loose specimen on an exposure on the Credit River at Streetsville, Mississauga, Ontario. Approximately 12 cm long and 10 cm wide. Comes from the Homotrypa streetsvillensis zone layer of fossiliferous limestone full of bryozoans. The layer is around 18 inches to 2 ft thick, as described by W.S. Dyer in his "Stratigraphy and Paleontology of the Credit River" on pg. 50.
  12. Anyone know what these are from?

    Found at a quarry in Eastern Ontario. We chiseled it from the rock at the quarry. Not sure what it is, we think it looks like teeth but we have no idea what from. Any help would be great
  13. Greenops widderensis

    Acquired from @PaleoPat during a recent trade. This trilobite is originally from Arkona and is uncommon.
  14. Just got back from Brechin and had a lovely time collecting with TFF members Malcomt and Ludwigia. Managed a pretty decent haul for my first time up there, and definitely my thanks to Malcolm who is a real veteran of the place in pointing out where to look and how to work the rock. It was a bit of a drive for us, but it was lovely. We had to leave a bit earlier to beat the traffic. So, pictures equal thousands of words, and all that. A few of our other members will probably have some other stuff to add to this thread. First up are hash plates. I am personally fond of them, and since these are in an Ordovician formation (Verulam) I've never collected before, it is all a great novelty to me. Gastros, brachs, byrozoans, trilo-bits, etc: And, a healthy serving of gastropods. I particularly like the large, high-spired ones (Fusispira sp.?) that weathered right out of the rock for easy surface collecting.
  15. Middle Devonian Bryozoan?

    Beyond being able to pick out a fenestellate bryozoan, my knowledge of bryozoans is quite poor. I was hoping for an ID on this one (bryozoan? sponge?), which is among the most peculiar I've found around these parts (these parts being fill deposited from Bois Blanc / Amherstburg Fms). Those large, circular pores were what persuaded me to take it home. Is it even a bryozoan? It is about an inch (though no saying how large it might have spread).
  16. Stromatoporoid Growth Forms?

    Lately if you have seen some of the topics I've started, these trips revolve around an Ordovician reef I came across by the Credit River in Mississauga, Ontario. One of the few things I discovered while exploring these spots is that there are plenty of Stromatocerium sponges which I red is a stromatoporoid. My question is, can anyone lead me to any papers about the growth forms of Ordovician stromatoporoids? I have found specimens of stromatoporoids and from the way I see it, some of the specimens I found of the same species have different growth forms. Some have those things they call monticules on the surface, and some don't exhibit them at all. Instead these specimens exhibit cracks and splits on the surface of the organism with irregular bumps and overgrowths. I'd like to know what causes this. Some of these sponges, from what I have collected, colonize some pieces of Prismostylus on the top.
  17. Fossil ID: cephalopod?

    Hi Can you confirm that this is a cephalopod? if not what is that? Found on the lake Ontario Canada shore - region Mississauga
  18. When I found this fossil it has some green algal growth on it as I found it on the grass. The algae did not cover the entire fossil but is there some way I can remove the yellow coating of this fossil? I've been scrubbing it with a brush under running water for a while now and some of the dirt does come off.
  19. Yesterday, after countless trips and exploring at the same old spots on the Credit River in Mississauga, Ont., I finally mustered the courage to go and wade on the water to an isolated exposure out the Georgian Bay Formation at Streetsville, Mississauga. I wanted to collect fossils that were not worn out as these were all I was finding in my old spots. I have been setting my eyes on this exposure from the other side of the Credit River for some time now ever since I started collecting along the Streetsville area and it could possibly harbour fresh material. The temperature of the afternoon was around 16-20 degrees Celsius so the water was not chilly as I was expecting it to be. I crossed the water barefoot with the water reaching up my knees at this tributary that separated the exposure from the main path. The Credit has many tributaries flowing and where the these tributaries converged the river, many exposures can be found along these places. After crossing I reached the other side without slipping on the slimy bottom. The exposure had thin footing for exploration but I was able to walk back and forth without slipping onto the water.
  20. Found in northern Ontario Canada in limestone
  21. Toronto Conularia

    conularia 6.4 cm long, matrix of the specimen 14 cm
  22. Lingulichnus

    Lingulichnus verticalis (Hakes, 1976). The elliptical shaped and concave burrows or holes were made by a linguloid brachiopod burrowing in the sediment. I took this plate home as I have never seen so many Lingulichnus burrows on one plate. Rock is limestone and was most likely mud before it lithified. Bibliography: Systematic Ichnology of the Late Ordovician Georgian Bay Formation of Southern Ontario, Eastern Canada, 1998, by D. Christopher A. Stanley and Ron K. Pickerill
  23. Amecystis laevis

    Amecystis laevis (Ulrich and Kirk, 1921). Upper Bobcaygeon Formation, Middle Ordovician. Simcoe County, Ontario, Canada. This specimen is among the ten specimens on a hash plate that was won in a bid and bought over Ebay. The specimen is missing the two tentacles at the top of the head. Length of the specimen was measured by using a measuring tape.
  24. Favistella sp.

    From the album Georgian Bay Formation (Upper Member) Outside of Toronto, Ontario

    Favistella sp. (alveolata or calicina?) coral from the Credit River near Streetsville, Mississauga. Georgian Bay Formation, Streetsville Member, late Ordovician. Found as a loose specimen by the banks of the Credit River. This colonial rugose coral is very abundant along the site with many small loose colonies. Some colonies can be found on a limestone matrix. Please click on image sizes to see details of the corallites.
  25. Side Views of the Prismostylus sp. Specimen

    From the album Georgian Bay Formation (Upper Member) Outside of Toronto, Ontario

    Side view of the Prismostylus sp. specimen. Credit River near the Streetsville area, Mississauga, Ontario. Georgian Bay Formation, Streetsville Member. Late Ordovician.
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