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  1. FF7_Yuffie

    Nanotyraannus, Rex or Raptor?

    Hi, Any thoughts on this? It is from Garfield, County, Montana. 1.8 cm so it's quite small. The serrations are a bit battered and have matrix stuck on them, but are present. Any thoughts would be appreciated. The white marks, am I right that this is from plant roots wrapped around the tooth? Thanks
  2. Hi TFF, I am a Dromaeosauridae enthusiast and have been collecting online for a little while now. I want to thank the members here for getting me educated on so many aspects of fossil teeth identification. I want to share my small collection in the hopes this is helpful for some of you in the future. Your critical input is highly appreciated, as always! #1 First up, one of my treasures, a robust Deinonychus antirrhopus tooth from the Cloverly Fm. A big thanks to @StevenJD for letting go of this one – much appreciated! Note the asymmetry in the placement of the carinae
  3. I see a vertical pupil raptor eye and embryo in the egg shaped, smooth rock. I was looking for geodes, I found this tiny geode, broke it open at home, and the other half broke into pieces - 3 or 4 crumbly. I did this 17 years ago. Now, I have joined a lapidary group, ALMS Alabama, and been to a meeting, and I have had this on my shelf for 17 years. I was thinking it is an ugly geode nodule? But then, yesterday I thought, it looks like an egg, it's insides are multicolored like a fossilized egg? I then go my magnifying glass and I can see an eye, and 3 part skull with divisions line
  4. Sergiorex

    Identification nano, trex or raptor

    This was found in Powder River county, Montana. and I was wondering what species it is, they think it’s nano but I’m leaning towards trex as it’s more robust and has a circular bottom
  5. Zapsalis

    Possible Dromaeosaurid Tooth?

    Hello, So I came across this seller offering a “Dromaeosaurus tooth”, and I was wondering if it was properly ID’d. The serrations are pretty worn up front, so I’m unsure. The only locality that I can get is Judith River Formation, Montana. (IIRC, Dromaeosaurus isn’t found in the Judith River Formation.) The dimensions of the tooth are 1.3 inches long, 0.2 inches wide, and 0.1 inches thick. It’s been a little while since I’ve last posted here, because I was busy with life and university. Hopefully I did things correctly.
  6. Redbearded812

    Micro Raptor

    I have some weak terrible pics of it, but I think this is a micro Raptor from the Triassic period, size of a cat, first time a bird evolved to dinosaur. I think it's curled up in a ball and died sunk to the bottom of the what use to b ocean for millions of years and was embedded in sand and limestone combined with the water replacing the nutrients of the fossil made it well preserved, similar to the way most matrix would house dino fossilis, except this isn't digging it out of a rock quarry somewhere, this was just a Rock at the bottom of the bottoms in a creek.
  7. Purchase this raptor egg from a gem and mineral show. Was wondering if anybody can identify the species. and if it’s authentic
  8. Nanotyrannus35

    Hell Creek Dromaeosaur Tooth?

    I'd recently received this tooth and was wondering if it would be able to be identified. The serrations are worn off, it's about .2 inches and the only providence that I have is Hell Creek. Thanks for any help. One side The other side And one of the carina
  9. Are there any raptors in the Kem Kem formation? I've seen that I think just about all of the teeth listed as raptor are actually abelisaur. On Wikipedia, it said that Deltadromeus isn't a raptor. I'm confused because I had thought that it was.
  10. Hello! I am student of the biological sciences with an intended minor in geology. I have been collecting fossils for a long time, and am excited to join the forum! I just purchased my first "dinosaur" specimen from an annual fossil show. My collection and interest has always been in Paleozoic invertebrates, so my dinosaur knowledge is extremely limited. The seller said the species was of the Dromaeosaurus genus and the origin was from the well known Hell Creek formation, however I took everything he said with a grain of salt. After reading some previous posts on the forum i've seen that i
  11. Fast. Intelligent. Deadly. The "Raptor" is perhaps one of the most famous dinosaur today thanks to Jurassic Park. To many people's surprise however, raptors are heavily feathered and nimbler than movies would have you believe. The Jurassic Park Velociraptor was merely the size of coyote in real life! In fact, their proper family name is 'Dromaeosaurid'. The largest species was Utahraptor, and it grew to the size of a grizzly bear! Dromaeosaurid fossils have been found all over the world. They first appeared during the Cretaceous, though isolated teeth have been found in the mid-Jurassic. Allow
  12. I'd found this small partial tooth about a half an inch long, it looks like it is a theropod tooth and it has a strange wear facet thing at the bottom. I was wondering if I could get some advice on what this tooth is and what the strange wear facet is. Here are the pics. Thanks for any help
  13. ThePhysicist

    Dromaeosauridae

    From the album: Hell Creek / Lance Formations

    Dromaeosauridae (Cf. Acheroraptor temertyorum) Hell Creek Fm., Carter Co., MT, USA Acheroraptor's dentition is known incompletely, so it's possible this tooth is from Acheroraptor. Until more material is described, this tooth will remain indeterminate. There may be slight facets, but I'm not confident that's what I'm seeing.
  14. ThePhysicist

    Acheroraptor temertyorum

    From the album: Hell Creek / Lance Formations

    Acheroraptor temertyorum Hell Creek Fm., Garfield Co., MT, USA A Velociraptorine tooth with the diagnostic longitudinal ridges Acheroraptor is known for. This tooth has some wear on the tip and root etching at the base. Art by Emily Willoughby
  15. ThePhysicist

    Acheroraptor tooth

    Identification A. temertyorum is characterized by the typical Dromaeosaurid traits (compressed, recurved, differing mc/dc serration densities), and longitudinal ridges/facets on the crown face. Notes This tooth was found this past Summer ('21), and in the same county as the holotype specimen.
  16. ThePhysicist

    Acheroraptor temertyorum

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Acheroraptor temertyorum Hell Creek Fm., Garfield Co., MT, USA Note the diagnostic ridges.
  17. FF7_Yuffie

    Mongolia tooth?

    Hi picked this up at a mineral show over weekend here in Taiwan. It was sold as tooth from Djadochta, if anyone can take a look? Hope photos are ok. It is small, 4mm. So its tricky to get a pic, also hindered by my essential tremor.
  18. Joebiwan3

    Hell creek theropod tooth

    I have this tooth that i believe to be a small nanotyrannus but i just want to get confirmation so let me know what you think everyone. Its from the Hell Creek Formation. Garfield Ct. Montana. Its CH is 11 mm Serration count: Distal 12 per 3 mm Mesial 15 per 3 mm The base of this tooth is beat up so its impossible to see if it would have had that rectangular pinch that is characteristic of nano teeth. There seems to be no twist of the mesial carinae In my opinion the serrations look peg like as seen in nano teeth.
  19. carch_23

    Deinonychus tooth?

    Hey was wondering what you guys think of this “Deinonychus” tooth? Info provided was Cloverly Formation, Montana, Cretaceous 105 myo. Those are also only the 2 photos available at the moment. Just looking at it now, one side of the tooth (nit the side with the bigger serrations) look quite worn. But i think i can make out some bumps in the first pic? So if they are serrations, the side with the more prominent serrations does look a lot larger? Thanks!
  20. TUrban

    Montana fossils

    Hello, I recently acquired a small box of fossils from someone who had passed away recently. Inside were many fossils including those pictured. The only indicator of where they are from is that the box says "MONTANA". I can tell there are dromeosaur teeth, hadrosaur teeth, ankylosaur teeth and such. I know the man I got them from would routinely dig in the hell creek formation but I just wanted to make sure there wasn't anything obvious that I'm missing that would indicate that these fossils were collected elsewhere. My guess is that they are from the hell creek formation however.
  21. Hello! I inherited this piece with the idea that it could possibly be a space rock. I checked the magnetism and it has no magnetic properties whatsoever. After closer examination with an open mind and a little imagination, I see a petrified baby dinosaur laid on its side with its neck possibly broken at the base of the skull. Below what looks like the neck is a split section that looks like a chest cavity with a arm/leg on either side. . The strangest part is that there seems to be the head of another species resting on the side of the laid do
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