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Found 870 results

  1. Squalicorax sp.

    From the album Post Oak Creek

    Squalicorax teeth, likely curvatus and kaupi. Scale bar = 1 cm. Collected 6/21/19.
  2. Scapanorhynchus texanus

    From the album Post Oak Creek

    Teeth of S. texanus. Scale bar = 1 cm. Collected 6/21/19.
  3. Ptychodus whipplei

    From the album Post Oak Creek

    Teeth of P. whipplei. Scale bar = 1 cm. Collected 6/21/19.
  4. A day in Summerville, SC

    First time fossil hunter, and we had a blast! If anyone needs a guide, or just advice, I HIGHLY recommend Barry Segura of Fossil Madness (his company). He was able to point us in the right direction, as well as hook us up with some great equipment. Thank you for everyone on TFF that encouraged and gave me advice!!!
  5. Myrtle Beach

    Hi all. Anyone know of or heard about any inland sites to search in the Grand Strand area of SC coast. I know of good sites farther south in Charleston and Summerville and such. Trying to figure out if there are any places to dig and sift right near Myrtle Beach. In looking at a map it seems like there should be some Pleistocene era fossils around but with my limited knowledge I’m not sure where or how deep a layer might be. The Little River is near by but not sure if it’s a candidate. Trying to find somewhere to search besides just the beach. Thanks for any thoughts or ideas.
  6. Are these megaldon?

    Found these hunting for teeth along a beach in Venice FL. They are kind of small, but I thought that could maybe be prosterior teeth? Any opinion is appreciated. Thanks! -HT
  7. I went down to a beach in Venice Fl today (not Venice beach) and found a lot of teeth! I haven’t counted them yet FYI. I have a couple that I think are megs that I will upload pictures for soon. There was great weather as well. Some of the ones I picked up have awesome color.... But anyways, it was a really good trip, and I would like to know if I have any megs here. I will upload two teeth that look like megs to me, but if you guys spot anything in my large picture, please let me know! Thanks! -HT
  8. Good morning to all, I will be traveling to Seabrook, South Carolina on Saturday (6/15/19), and have been doing some research regarding potential sites to go shark tooth/fossil hunting. I have been fascinated with fossils and shark teeth my entire life, but never lived in a location to support this hobby. I've read that Summerville, Charleston, and Cooper River (maybe off-shooting creeks), are common spots, but I'd like to have a more calculated game plan than just stopping at random rivers/creeks LOL. After reading through several of the forums here, I understand that some basic advice would be to utilize google earth or maps, and attempt to locate "dredge spots" in rivers..? Would anyone be willing to help a newbie out with some research 101 type advice? Again, your craft absolutely AMAZES me!!! Any and all advice is greatly appreciated!!!
  9. I was recently reading some studies on extant sharks to see if there was a way we could incorporate a more direct message about extant shark conservation in our future education programs. I was struck by the plight of Angelsharks and decided to make this special animal a featured species in next years programs. We have a great opportunity to bring some awareness to the conservation issues that these sharks face while doing our fossil education programs with Project Angelshark. Carter and I have decided to donate a percentage of each paid education program to the Angelshark Conservation Network in addition to featuring them in the program. We may also do some T-shirts to sell with proceeds going to the same cause. I spent many years working in wildlife conservation and we wanted to work this idea into our programs which is difficult when you are dealing with fossil education. The Angelshark is the perfect critter for us to start with because they extend back to the Jurassic and we should be able to trace their history in the fossil record pretty effectively. Some extant Angelsharks are critically endangered and they are not exactly the public face of shark conservation, even though they could be. They are pretty cute. We can make a small impact on the effort to save them by teaching kids about them. They are found in California and this helps us in our goal of connecting kids to modern species here through fossils. They are a specialized shark with some cool adaptations which makes them perfect for the education program in that sense too. We currently have a possible Squatinadae tooth from the Jurassic and our lone STH Squatina tooth. We need to fill in the blank spaces between the Jurassic and Miocene but I think we can accomplish that over the summer. As a collector, it seems an attainable goal to put together a nice collection of Squatina teeth without breaking the bank. One of our goals in splitting the program into two presentations was to work in more modern shark families and a focus on Angelsharks fits that idea beautifully. We are very proud of this idea and it is something we will repeat going forward. I feel like this is an excellent cause for us to take up and a wonderful chance to help the conservation effort for these sharks. I am pretty excited about this project. It combines some of my favorite things: sharks, fossils, education, and Carter's artwork
  10. Point A dam Fossils

    Can someone please help identify? I used some keys from the Eocene Era to help. Maybe some correct? Thanks
  11. Oligocene

    Due to the smaller cusp, these would be Carcharocles Angustidens??
  12. Carcharocles

    This group of teeth should be from the Eocene period? Carcharocles Auriculatus I am guessing due to the size of the cusp?? Teeth are 1.4" and found in the Chandler bridge formation.
  13. Trip to Batesford Quarry

    G'day Everyone! Yesterday my dad and I were lucky to visit Batesford Quarry in Geelong, Victoria. The fossils here are miocene in age from the Batesford Limestone. Fossils foudn here consist of sharks teeth, cetacean fossils, rare bird and terrestial mammal material and invertebrate fossils, mainily echinoderms. Batesford Quarry is one of the places my dad and I have been wanting to go to for many years due to it's high concentration of vertebrate fossils compared to other Victorian fossil sites (Mostly Shark Teeth). We arrived at the Quarry around 8:30 AM and spent the next 6 hours searching the spoil piles for sharks teeth. Due to the heavy rain the past few days, the sharks teeth were harder to find as the sand was wet and hard to seive and see the elsuive teeth. However my dad and I came home with a good haul, collecting a total of 28 sharks teeth, a nice fish tooth plate and numerous invertebrate fossils. I am not the best at IDing shark teeth so any help will be greatly appreciated Thanks for reading! The Shark Teeth Haul Grey Nurse Shark? (Carcharias taurus) Isurus? Rare Galeocerdo Dan
  14. Galeocerdo sp.

    From the album Sharks

    A pair of small tiger shark teeth. notice the complex serrations. (serrations on serrations!)
  15. Squalicorax pristodontus

    From the album Sharks

    Very nice S. pristodontus teeth from Morocco. Notice the serrations are even on the tip of the blade.
  16. Carcharias taurus

    From the album Sharks

    Fossilized sand tiger shark teeth. This species is the same one living today; you often see them in aquariums.
  17. Scapanorhynchus texanus

    From the album Sharks

    A nice S. texanus tooth. (extinct goblin shark)
  18. Squalicorax kaupi

    From the album Sharks

    Two nice S. kaupi teeth.
  19. Carcharocles megalodon

    From the album Sharks

    Two small megalodon teeth from N. Carolina.
  20. Ancient Great White Shark

    From the album Sharks

    Three fossilized great white shark teeth with nice coloration. Unfortunately, roots are missing on all of them.
  21. Hey guys, is it anywhere along the Rappahannock river anyone knows of to find sharks teeth? I know Westmoreland state park on the Potomac has some. But just curious if the Rappahannock river produces any? If so message me in my inbox please. Saw some videos online of nice makos found in streams but not sure where they found them in Virginia at. Thanks in advance
  22. Hi friends! I'm new, I just stumbled across this forum and it's awesome content while searching for fossil localities near Charleston, South Carolina. I was hoping to get some tips on looking for shark teeth anywhere between Columbia and Charleston. I am taking a road trip from AZ with my family and thought it would be really great to stop and search for fossils along the way. I just can't seem to really pin down any nice spots to find some. I know fossil hunting grounds are a very hush-hush type of thing, but I was hoping that I could be pointed in the direction of somewhere where I might be able to take the kids and hopefully find 5 to 10 teeth. Is anyone willing to share a location that is easily accessible where we can find a few neat little fossils? Maybe somewhere like a road cut, an easily accessible creek, or even a pile of excavated dirt...? Thanks so much!
  23. Finally made a trip to the North Sulphur River. As a first timer, I went straight to the Ladonia Fossil Park. It has a large parking area with clear access to the river bottom. Keep in mind, the access is good, but the steps are HUGE. Going down isn't too difficult, but getting back up had me climbing them on my hands/knees. There is an ATV trail on the east side of the bridge that I was told has a more gradual slope, but you'll need to keep an eye open for snakes/insects, as its heavily overgrown with vegetation. I had a great time searching the river bed and banks for fossils. I found tons of baculite segments and lots of vertabrate bone fragments (likely mosasaur). Very few well preserved specimens with the majority worn beyond identification. Also found a few oyster shells, gastropods, and shark teeth. Tools aren't necessary, but you may want to carry scraping tool or a small pry bar for working the bank exposures. Screen boxes also come in handy for sifting through sediments in the river bed. A few words to the wise: - during spring/summer, be sure to wear sunscreen and stay hydrated - use a walking stick to steady yourself and for testing areas ahead of your walk path - try to stay on gravel bars, as the mud can be deep especially along edge of the banks - when walking through water between gravel bars try to avoid walking on shale layers as it is extremely slippery - be aware that there is lots of broken glass, concrete rubble, rusty metal, and other debris - for the above reasons and the fact that they are not very supportive, I would strongly advise against flip flops with firsthand knowledge (in the words of Jimmy Buffet, "I blew out my flip flop, stepped on a pop top........." ) And lastly, always check the water level of the river before making the trek - go to the National Weather Service for North Sulphur River near Cooper, TX (Gauge CPPT2) https://water.weather.gov/ahps2/hydrograph.php?wfo=fwd&gage=cppt2&hydro_type=0 I can't wait to go back.
  24. Dorchester creek

    Spoils of a fun adventure today Dorchester creek Summerville South Carolina
  25. Hello everyone! I have been a fossil hunter for two years now and wanted to share just some of my favorite finds so far! All were found in Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina. Thanks for looking!
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