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Found 680 results

  1. Id please

    Can anyone ID these two teeth for me please. Thanks!
  2. Fossils on Wheels got our first donations of fossil materials for our education program this week. My son and I have donated some of our fossils and loaned the rest. Since we are applying for a 501c3, we have to keep careful track of our fossils. IF they are paid for by Fossils on Wheels money, they belong to Fossils on Wheels. If they are purchased with our money, we donate and loan. Donations belong to Fossils on Wheels, not my son and I. I think that clarification is a good thing to let people know about because donations come from our new friends private collections and they are given with the intention of being used for education and given to the kiddos we educate. My son and I do not sell fossils. Fossils on Wheels will not be legally able to sell fossils. We will also not be trading donated fossils. They are strictly for education purposes. If you do donate fossils, we can track how they are used and verify where they end up. We had two donations this week and we want to thank our donors. The first donation was from @JBMugu and included a lot of shark teeth and mammal bones from Sharktooth Hill a.k.a Round Mountain Silt. Most of the teeth will be given to students from Paradise and Chico schools. A small number will stay in the program for shark tooth ID labs. A couple dozen of the teeth are headed to the Gateway Science Museum as a separate donation. The mammal bones will be used in our intermediate school education programs that focus on classification and evolution. All of these fossils, except for one ear bone, will be used for hands on exploration of fossils. The ear bone, I think it is from a small Odontoceti, will be used as a presentation piece for the evolution lab. We also got a donation of some super cool shark teeth from @caldigger and information explaining some of the differences in the fossilization process and why different fossils from different locations look different. We do want to explore the process of fossilization and how geology lets us learn about the natural history of the planet. This donation included a super cool split tooth that shows in the process perfectly. These teeth are for the presentation and the kids will get to handle a few of them in ID labs as well. We just wanted to thank our donors and to let our fellow TFF members know how much these donations help us with our goal is bringing fossil education to our local children. The first picture is various verts from STH. The large one, bottom left, is a cetacean. It looks very similar to a couple of Tiphyocetus verts from STH that i have. There is another large one which I would think would be cetacean. The smaller mammal verts I am not sure about. There is also a shark vert. Second picture is STH shark teeth. There C. hastalis, planus, plus a few tiger sharks and a few I am unsure about right now. Some still have STH dirt on them and I am thinking about having kids clean them during a lab. The third picture is the shark teeth from @caldigger including our first Pygmy White Shark teeth from morocco, some beautiful mako teeth and a few others that I need to ID.
  3. Hey TFF Members! If you saw the last video I shared, we took our buddy Bob from Canada out Echinoid hunting in Yankeetown recently. He was in town for a few days so we also had a chance to take him shark tooth hunting! We didn't find anything huge, but we found a lot of really great fossils. The teeth here are very colorful and there are a lot of them. Of course, this video isn't lacking in Cris and I's strange shenanigans Even though we didn't find anything insane, it was an amazing day spent with great people, and we found tons of cool fossils. This beats a day at the office any day! Give it a watch if you are interested and have some time
  4. Our last post left off just before the Permian so this is where the students will learn about the series extinction events known as The Great Dying. One of the really interesting points in shark evolution is the survival of sharks during this period. They survived by adapting to a vastly different climate and a much different aquatic world. This is when the Hydobonts really emerge and the age of the modern shark starts. The first species we cover are the xenacanthids. We originally placed the Eel Sharks in the Golden Age of Sharks section but I wanted to illustrate that some that while a few xenacanthid sharks survived the Permian extinction, they died off shortly after. They were apex predators in freshwater ecosystems until 266 mya. The adaptations we hit on are the forked teeth and eel like body. Despite being an apex predator and some initially surviving the Permian, they were unable to survive long term either due to being unable to adapt to long term changes in the aquatic environments they formally dominated or were out competed by animals better adapted or both. The Hybodonts first start appearing in the fossil record in the Carboniferous era and much of the diversity of the family was lost during Permian but Hybodonts would became the dominant shark of the Triassic and lasted until the Miocene. They were varied in form, size, and habitat. Hybodont sharks lived in freshwater environments and marine environments. They are known from fossil formations that are shallow and deep. They evolved to fill a variety of ecological niches. They had different kinds of teeth for different kinds of prey. We specifically touch on Hybodus obtusus, Lissodes minimus, and the tiny, fairly recently described Reticulodus synergus as those are the species we have. My son's early sketch of Reticulodus is super cool. Given that this is smallest shark we are discussing, the art work is the hook more than the micro fossil. This is the one spot in the shark program that is a little visually underwhelming from a fossil standpoint. We have only a few small items so it lacks the visual appeal of the weirdness of earlier sharks and the WOW effect of the giant sharks that follow. This is a very fixable issue for us. I found a source for Orthacanthus teeth and we are planning on picking up a nice dentition set to go with our partial spine. Carter drew his Orthacanthus in a position that will match the dentition and spine when we have the teeth. A weakness now will be a visual strength in a month or two. I would really love to pick up an Anstercanthus tooth and spine too. They seem to be out there on the market from time to time. We plan on grabbing a few more Lissodes teeth and Reticulodus teeth too. A number of small teeth can make a nice display. Here are the fossils we currently have for the presentation Pic 1 Orthacanthus texanus tooth and partial spine of an unidentified Orthacanthus. Both are from Oklahoma I believe. Pic 2 Hybodus obtusus tooth. A small tooth and one that needs some additional material. Pic 3 A picture of all the fossils for the presentation including Lissodes minimus and Reticulodus synergus. Yup the dots are cool shark teeth lol I actually love the tiny sharks and this will be one of my favorite spots in the presentation because we deliver these right before we get into the giant animals that follow.
  5. Tooth found in Wisconsin

    Okay, I found this tooth in Wisconsin. It was on the shore of an island that was land 90 years ago. Can anyone tell me if this is a shark tooth. The closest I can tell is its a mako, but all history books say that would be impossible. Maybe its reptile or some kind of gar, or maybe a even a mammal... Here is a video link.....and yes I'm a painter on break, hence the dirty hands lol.
  6. Hello everyone, I am making a shadow box for my office; before I start doing the final groupings by species and attaching said groupings to the shadow box, I could really use some help. I have made my best educated guesses (using Jayson’s website for references), but since I am a novice, I know I’ve made several mistakes. Will you you please take a look at the attached pictures and let me know if I guessed correctly? If not, will you please let me know the correct answer?
  7. Hello everyone, Last Saturday, October 6th, I joint a fossil hunting excursion of the Dutch geological society (NGV) to the ENCI quarry, near the town of Maastricht (The Netherlands). This quarry has been in production since 1926, and has been one of the best fossil hunting sites of the Netherlands ever since. Worldwide, the youngest time interval of the Cretaceous Period is known as the Maastrichtian, a reference to the rock layers exposed in this area. We owe this international reference to the instrumental work of Belgian geologist André Hubert Dumont, who, in 1849, first described the rock layers in the valley of the Meuse River, close to the present-day ENCI quarry. Consequently, the rock sequence in the ENCI quarry constitutes the original type-locality of the Maastrichtian Stage. The Maastrichtian rocks are also world famous for their excavated mosasaur skeletons (the word 'mosa' is latin for the river Meuse. Mosasaurs are also named after this locality). Yet, unfortunately, all good things come to an end: the ENCI quarry is closing down. The production has stopped this month, and the quarry is now turned into a nature conservation area. Most of the quarry walls are currently being covered up, to make 'nice' gently slopes. Burying all remaining fossils forever.... So the remaining few excursions this year are the very last opportunity to hunt some fossils in this once glorious pit. I have been there a couple of times this year, and every trip fills me with melancholy. While the hunting is still relatively okay(ish), the possibilities become fewer and fewer, and only a very small part of the total strata can be examined....
  8. After the Hybodontids, our program starts to transition toward the modern sharks. We introduce lamniform sharks and the cow sharks. We will not be able to spend much time at all on the Cow and Crow Sharks. They only get a brief introduction and a look at the teeth. Squalicorax is an important species for us even though we do not spend a lot of time on it. The students in first few classes we do presentations for will be going home with Squalicorax teeth from Morocco. We would like to spend more time on the Cow sharks eventually but we only have one tooth to show them and we will have to edit content to free up space for them but I will work on that down the road. The primary focus in this section is Scapanorhynchus. The first shark art Carter did was a Goblin and we do give them a lot of time in the presentaton. They look cool and have been around for a long time. We present the kids with a nice assortment of teeth and some cool science. The teeth were important adaptations for catching fish and the snout had the ampullae of Lorenzini for sensing changes in the electro magnetic fields around them. We compare this to the modern hammerhead which we do not cover in the program but gives the kids a sense of how the adaptations of hammerheads work. We also talk about fin structure and being able to tell they were slow swimmers. The extend-o-matic jaw is another adaptation we cover with this species. I am happy with the fossil representations for now though I really want to add more Cow Shark fossils at some point and Anomotodon would also be a good addition. The fossils for the presentation.. Pic 1 Hexanchus andersoni from STH. I know H. andersoni should chronologically fit later but Cow Sharks fit here and this is the only one we have for now. Pic 2- Squalicorax pristodontus from Morocco. This is our largest Squalicorax tooth. The kids will get these teeth to take home so while we do not spend a lot of time on them, the teeth are very important to the program. Pic 3- Scapnorhynchus texanus and Scapanorhynchus puercoensis. Our nice little Goblin Shark display with some of our best teeth. Two of the texanus teeth are over 1.5 inches and the puercoenisis teeth are uncommon I believe and pretty super cool.
  9. Our last post ended with goblin sharks and the next era up in the presentation is one of my favorites. We get to the large sharks of the Cretaceous. This is also where the adaptations get more specific and where the science gets more heavy duty for the kids such as discussing regional endothermy. I am a firm believer than you do not "dumb down" complicated science to elementary students. You simplify and explain, you do not dumb it down. First up are the giant crushing sharks, Ptychodus. We present both P. mortoni and p. whipplei though most of the discussion is about mortoni. The kids will learn that there were at least 22 species of Ptychodus sharks, they are Hybodontid sharks and they were found in many locations around the world. They were plentiful in the Western Interior Seaway. They were large, probably very slow swimming bottom dwelling invertebrate eating specialists. We imagine them as looking similar to giant nurse sharks with features of the hybodonts. The focus is on those teeth and we have quite a few to show the kids. We explain how the separate teeth formed a plate like dentition for crushing shells. Next up is one of my favorite sharks, Cretoxyrhina mantelli. The Ginsu Shark gives us the rare chance to really described a prehistoric shark without theorizing much. The fossil record has been generous and this is a very well studied shark. We will explain to the kids that these were large sharks, up to 26 feet, and they looked very similar to modern Great Whites in general appearance. Despite being smaller than some of the monster marine reptiles, they were an apex predator. The key adaptation is the regional endothermy. For kids this goes like this... They had red muscles closer to the body axis and specialized blood vessels that allow for heat exchange. This means they were in a sense warm-blooded and this is a trait seen in modern sharks like Threshers, Makos and White Sharks. They could tolerate colder water than other species and were probably extremely fast sharks. I think the kids will get this concept and they will think this was one cool, though also kinda warm, shark lol At some point, I would love to add Cardabiodon to the program but have not seen around for sale so I assume they are rare and likely expensive. Anyway, the fossils for the program. Pic 1 One of the Ptychodus mortoni teeth we have from the Niobrara Chalk in Kansas. We have six and several are partial but put them all together in a Riker mount and they look pretty good. Pic 2 Ptychodus whipplei teeth from Kamp Ranch formation. We have a small assortment of these teeth and use them in the lab and as giveaways too. Pic 3 Cretoxyrhina mantelli from the Niobrara Chalk. Not the biggest tooth out there but one that I am very thankful to have. I will add more of these as we go along mostly because I love this species !!
  10. Hello, found this tooth in the Round Mountain Silt formation in Bakersfield this weekend. The tooth had serrations, but they are worn down. At first I thought the tooth was a small meg, or a large hemi. Upon closer inspection it does not seem to fit either of those species well. The root is not consistent with that of a meg nor a hemi. Now I am thinking it could be some kind of Requiem shark. What do you guys think?
  11. Our shark adaptation education program for elementary students follows up the Cladodonts with three of the craziest looking early sharks and three that we think kids will love learning about. The Eugeneodontid "sharks" may not be sharks but they are just too cool not to teach the kids about. Bizarre is interesting and I also love talking about evolutionary extremes. The best part of these next animals is that they each allow my son to really stretch out as an artist and create some weird looking creatures. The kids will learn that Edestus were large, predatory shark-like fish that are related to modern ratfish. We will quickly cover the tooth whorl which is where the term Scissor-tooth comes from. I have been reading theories as to how the teeth were used and I think it will be fun to discuss possible feeding methods with the kids. We will not spend much time on Listracanthus because there is not much information about them. I have seen them described as being eel-like and covered in the "feather" denticles. This is one that is really about the artwork so my son is the star with this species. Can not wait to see his finished rendition. I think the kids will really love Stethacanthus. I know it is a cladodont but we separate it in the presentation. The Anvil Shark is a wild creature. The anvil shaped, denticle covered spine, patch of spine on its head, and the whip-like projections from the pectoral fins are adaptations that are open to debate. Asking open ended questions with this species will be more fun than giving the kids theories. What do you think the spines were used for and what do you think those whips are all about? The kids will guide the presentation about Stethacanthus. While we wont be adding any additional Cladodont fossils any time soon, I do hope to add either Caseodus or Campodus to our collection before the end of spring. I like the Eugeneodontids as artistic subjects for my son so we will pick up more of these fossils as we progress. Our presentation fossils Pic 1- Edestus heinrichi. This is an Illinois coal mine fossil, dated to between 360-320 mya. Another personal favorite. These are not common and it is pretty cool to be able to show this one to students. Pic 2- Listracanthus. A "feather" denticle from the Pennsylvanian-Desmoinesian in Iowa. Not the best example as it is difficult to see but a good photograph will help. Still it is cool just to have the Feather Shark in the program ! Pic 3- Stethacanthus altonesis. One of the two teeth we have from the Caney Shale Formation in Oklahoma. Again, it is just too cool to have Stethacanthus fossils. I do not know how rare they are or anything but it is just such a freaky little creature.
  12. Bayfront Park 01/04/19

    Happy New Year, everyone! I was able to sneak in one more hunt before my winter break ended. I kicked off 2019 with another trip to my favorite winter location, Bayfront Park/Brownies Beach. The tides and weather looked favorable, not too cold and relatively low tide very early in the morning. I came more equipped than ever, complete with my new hunting gear that I got for Christmas, including a pair of chest waders (finally!), a sling pack, and a hat from the Calvert Marine Museum with an awesome Hemipristis design. I was one of the first to arrive, and quickly made use of the waders by rounding the cove that can be virtually impossible to pass without them. My waders feature a large mesh zipper pocket on the chest, and that proved to be remarkably useful. No more carrying around tupperware to hold my finds! I stepped foot on the beach about ten minutes before sunrise, and I was blessed with a gorgeous display of colors as the sun shone through the clouds. A few fellow hunters passed me, but I kept my head down and walked slowly, carefully examining every inch of the beach. I was finding a good deal of smalltooth sand tigers with awesome cusplets, but nothing too big for the first hour or so. Even though the majority of teeth found here are small, you can get some pretty stunning colors, not to mention the mind-blowing quality of preservation of some of the teeth. Even after millions of years, the teeth are still sharp enough to cut you fairly easily. That's something that never ceases to amaze me. Anyway, I soon stumbled across a larger tooth laying right out in the open, high up the beach in the dryer sand. It was a very pretty Isurus desori, a mako shark tooth! I happily dropped it into the pouch and kept moving. I continued to find small and medium sized teeth for the majority of the morning. At one point, I picked up a complete dolphin epiphysis, or "cookie" as many collectors call them. I had found a few fragments of them at this location before, but this was my first one to be fully intact. I found it increasingly difficult to navigate the beach as the tide came in, as there were many fresh tree falls and cliff slides due to the recent weather conditions. I decided to call it a day at around noon, so in total I hunted for about 5 hours. My haul consisted of a plethora of sand tigers, many tigers and requiems, a handful of small hemis, a few makos and hammerheads, one broken cow shark tooth, a few odontocete teeth, ray plates, the cookie, and a nice gastropod shell. A pretty typical Brownies haul. I ran into a few other collectors, none who seemed to have found anything incredible, but I always love talking fossils with fellow enthusiasts! I was even able to identify another hunter's find for her, which I always thoroughly enjoy as well. Overall, I had a very nice first trip of the new year and couldn't think of a better way to wrap up my winter break before heading back to school. Thanks for reading my report, and please check out the Hop 5, posted below. I'm starting something new with my trip reports in 2019! I HOPPE you'll enjoy! Sorry, I just can't help myself when it comes to puns. Hoppe hunting! ~David
  13. My son and I are doing our first Shark Adaptation classroom education program in March. We are using fossils from across the timeline of sharks to explain to the students how sharks have managed to stick around this planet for some 430 or so million years. I am very proud of the relatively small fossil shark collection we have. The kids will get to see and in a lot of cases handle some fossils from badass sharks. I thought it would be fun to put some of that collection and bits of the information we present. Eventually I will include the art work my son is producing. He is 5 months away from graduating high school so I limit his time on this art while he works his final art projects for school. The first shark we cover is also one of the most fun for me. The Cladodont sharks are pretty cool and as I recently learned present a perfect opportunity to utilize them in two different spots in our presentation. They start off the program because of Cladoselache. They were not the first shark but they are the basic design for sharks that would be recognizable to 3rd and 4th grade students. They had body type that modern sharks use and they had some fearsome looking teeth. They may be really small teeth but they were deadly if you were a small fish. Science thought these little sharks went extinct during the Great Dying but in 2013 that theory was proven wrong. There were Cladodont teeth found in France that dated to 120 million years ago. They survived the Permian by moving to deeper waters. The small shallow water sharks apparently became very successful as smaller deep water sharks. The physical adaptations are important but the adaptive behavior of sharks is a huge part of how sharks have survived for so long. We only get a few minutes on each shark so that is the basic stuff we will tell the kiddos. Here are the teeth. Pic 1- the unidentified Cladodont tooth. I love this tooth. It is one of my favorites. Under the micro eye, it looks so freaking cool. It could be a Symmorium. It could be something else. It might even be something new. It is from Russia and dated to 320 million years. This will get donated for research at some point. Pic 2- Cladodus belifer. A Mississippian tooth from Biggsville Quarry in Illinois.
  14. Kamp Ranch Texas Ptychodus Teeth

    I purchased some Ptychodus teeth and I can not determine the exact ID on my own. They are smaller than P. whippeli or P. mortoni teeth I have and bigger than the single P. anonymous tooth I have though that is the species I originally though, and still think these are. They are from the Kamp Ranch section of Eagle Ford in Texas. I consulted a very well put together ID guide here but am still just not sure what I have, other than nice Ptychodus teeth lol Any help would be appreciated.
  15. Hey guys! I actually missed a week of uploading, but Cris and I got back at it and went to one of our new creek sites for some more exploration! Unfortunately, we gave it a good go and didn't find anything great. So we literally went after dark to some of our trusty old road sites where fill material is used as road fill. This turned out to be an absolutely amazing decision, and ended up being one of our best hunts on the roads to date! This video is chock-full of weirdness, and great finds! Give it a watch when you get some time
  16. Scapanorhynchus puercoensis teeth

    Here are two teeth from a fairly recently (2011) described Scapanorhynchus species from the Upper Cretaceous Santonian in New Mexico. Scapanorhynchus puercoensis has a dentition similar to S. lewisii and was likely very similar. My son and I do classroom science presentations about fossils and our shark program features Scapanorhynchus. He used the lewisii as the basis for his illustration and now we can actually provide teeth that are a closer match to that than S. texanus likely was. This also allows him to draw S. texanus in a more Sand Tiger like form which we both think it was. I put quite a bit of research in our programs and we strive for accuracy so I am really digging these teeth !!!
  17. North Carolina Beach Trip

    Last week my wife and I took a trip to North Carolina; first to visit some relatives in Raleigh, but then to head to the coast and check out the beaches and find some sharks teeth, etc. While I had read that the NC beaches were not exactly the area with the highest volume of teeth, we had not been there before and wanted to see the area and I knew that we should at least be able to find some. I had hoped to visit at least one of the quarries near the coast for some older material but had learned from a quarry operator and additional info from @sixgill pete that all the quarries that are often available for fossil hunting were still closed due to flooding from last seasons hurricanes. There have been numerous posts on here about other trips and we have lots of distinguished members from NC and nearby that are way more familiar than I am with the area and its fossil offerings, but I thought I'd give you my impression as a first timer to the area and what to expect. The weather was fine our whole trip, pretty chilly in the morning but pleasant in the afternoon. It is January after all, this is not south Florida, but then we weren't in a deep chill like our more northern friends have been recently. Dress appropriately and it was great walking the beaches. We started in North Topsail Beach and walked the beach from the 210 bridge to the New River inlet in a couple of segments and found this collection of teeth. Sorry about the scale, that was all we had with us. For those that are not familiar with the goldfish cracker, it is about 2.25 cm or just under 1 inch in length. These teeth are just found on the beaches and come from the somewhat local Pliocene and Miocene aged sediments. You can see a couple of nice teeth in the middle and several more well worn or fragmentary pieces. I'm still learning my shark teeth, but the two in the middle appear to be a Sand Tiger and a Snaggletooth (Hemipristis). The big piece is interesting (and was by far the biggest we found on the beaches), I'm not sure if it is a Mako, a Great White (no apparent serrations but it is pretty worn) or even a piece of a Megalodon (its pretty thick and heavy). Next we went a bit south to Topsail Beach and walked a good bit. We found this group of teeth down there (second pic). Another very nice Hemipristis and a variety of other, smaller teeth. On our last walk on North Topsail, a gentleman showed up just after us and found a beautiful 2" tooth just where we entered the beach. We had turned right and he turned left and there it was! Darn, just missed that one!!
  18. nj cretaceous trip today

    the wifey and I did a quick trip today that yielded some nice finds....was a really nice day for the middle of winter...thought id share some pictures from today..:)
  19. Shark Teeth to identify

    We found these teeth in Malta where fossils are quite rare. This is my first find so its quite exiting to know what they are. After some research I have a feeling they are Megalodon but I would like someone to confirm my conclusion. I am able to post some more pics if required. Thanks in advance Jezz
  20. Rapp beach trip

    Went out Wednesday, expecting a super low tide. When I arrived I saw exposed sandbars everywhere, but there was also ice everywhere, the beach was frozen out 50 yards, ice covered (spectacular but I have had issues with wet phones, so no photos) and I quickly gave up and headed home. Tried again a few days later after warmth and rain. The tide was very low but everything seemed sand covered. There was a line of shells at the wash and I walked out 20-30 feet where I normally cannot go in my boots and picked up a few medium size chunks of whale bones, but mostly the beach seemed devoid even of much trashy stuff and no teeth. The water was super cold the beach above the tide line was frozen and pickings were scarce for the first hour. Started to leave but as the tide started in I started finding a stray tooth and other stuff here and there. Lots of small "whale bones", some dense and solid as rock, others cancelous bone and three "shrimp coprolite burrows". Found an old piece of deer skull with a hollow portion of antler attached. A porpoise tooth. And a tooth, claw or bone (?) with longitudinal fine enameled stripes, somewhat hollow on the other side. I'm sure more was moved by the storms last week, just need the layer of sand to be washed out.
  21. Well, it's been a while since I've been out and about growing my collection of long-since-perished critters, so needless to say, I've been restless. I've been somewhat late in putting up my trip report, as this was doubling as a school project (writing a news feature on PAG (Paleontology Association of GA) for the school news site, 3ten) and everything at the place was taken on an NVidia whereas usually my smartphone does the trick. Anyway, enough BORING excuse backstories! Let's get to the meat of it! This past week was rather hectic for me. A trip to Pensacola where I swam in September ocean thinking it was July, a wisdom tooth surgery happened and the Braves got that sweet, succulent NL East crown, punching their ticket into October ball. Adding this trip on top of that made my fall break jam packed. I'd been waiting for an eternity to go to Sandersville with PAG ever since I heard of the announcement on their page way back in August. As soon as I was greenlit by my the editors of the school news to cover the event for school news, I was going, half dead from wisdom teeth or not. It turns out I wasn't as energy-sapped as I thought I'd be, as my wisdom tooth recovery had been pretty speedy (thank the Lord). Everyone going met in a Walmart parking lot more minutes away. We got told of the treasures we'd find (though I already knew): Periarchus sand dollars (heck yeah!) Crassostrea Gigantissima oysters (yes pls!) And shark teeth/Ray plates (good for me!) After that and a brief discussion on directions and my covering the trip for the school news, we headed off about a minute or so down the road to the landowner's property. We pulled in on a dirt road, and parked in an area of tall grass. The actual site itself was a short trek through the woods to get to the small creek where the Sandersville Limestone was actually exposed. It was somewhat difficult to get the camera equipment down to the creek along with the gear which I was actually using to get stuff out of the matrix, but it wasn't unmanageable and was definitely worth it. Here's what the much of the creek looked like: After getting together all of my pictures for the news, I went ahead and got to the fun part: finding stuff! My first and primary objective was the Periarchus quinquefarius kewi sand dollars, as with my trip to Montgomery in July, I have officially caught the echie bug. It didn't take very long to start finding them protruding from the limestone: After taking four with me, I moved to my next target: the Crassostrea Gigantissima oysters. These hold a special place in my heart, as my uncle Frank and I went driving near Griffins Landing trying to find an access point to get some of these huge oysters to no avail. Also, I heard that these oysters can only be found in Georgia (though i'm not sure about how true that statement is. Any answers regarding this?). To find them, I went a way downstream to where this Oyster exposure is: I was already getting packed with inverts, and I had a lot of stuff to carry back to the car, so I only took the most complete one I saw. Last but not least, I made a pitstop at where most of the group was sifting at a particularly deep and clay-ey part of the creek for shark's teeth and decided to indulge myself in a handful. Here are some of the other guys getting sift-fulls: Next post: My finds of the trip
  22. Hello everyone, I will be visiting the Washington DC area, and want to take a trip to the Potomac to hunt for some shark teeth. Can anyone suggest a good area, and possibly some gear to wear this time of year? I normally wear a wet suit and waterproof boots for this sort of thing and stay relatively warm, so I'm not too worried about the cold. I am looking for a spot with easy access, and preferably not private property, unless someone is willing to let me search on their land. I have never been to the Potomac before, so any suggestions are welcome! Thank you!
  23. As the year comes to a close i decided to do a bit more collecting at one of my favourite Australian sites: Beaumaris near Melbourne in Victoria, Australia. Once again i travelled down and stayed at a motel near the beach for three days (27/12/18 through to 29/12/18). This trip is a sequel to the previous two trips i have made here which are also posted on the forum: Jan 2016 trip: http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/61248-fossil-hunting-holiday-in-victoria-australia-dec-2015-jan-2016/ Feb 2017 trip: http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/71996-fossil-hunting-holiday-at-beaumaris-australia-feb-2017/ Beaumaris is a significant site with both marine and terrestrial fossils from the latest Miocene aged Beaumaris Sandstone Formation (5 - 6 million years old), which crops out in distinctly red-coloured coastal cliffs and also in offshore rocky reefs. An impressive diversity of both vertebrate and invertebrate fauna occurs here, and the Melbourne Museum has put together a neat PDF of the fossil diversity for those unfamiliar with the site (https://www.bcs.asn.au/fossils_of_beaumaris_2015-02.pdf). My plan was to collect every single low tide across these three days, and sleep during every high tide. Yes, this meant going out collecting in the middle of the night too! My main interest was to collect shark teeth, however they can be tough to find here and are certainly not as common as at many other sites internationally that the people on this forum would be more familiar with. This often seems to be the case with Australian vertebrate fossils. It does however make it quite rewarding when you do eventually find them! The first day of searching (27/12/18) proved to be rather disappointing. I finally got to try snorkelling for fossils, which is a popular method here for finding things exposed along the seabed, but alas after about 3 hours in the water i had not found any bones or teeth. I was unable to locate the nodule bed where most of the vertebrate fossils originate from, which i think played a part in my lack of success. The seabed was also quite sanded over and it was hard to see much. I was definitely out of my element here, but it was also a lot of fun to get close to some of the local marine life, including stingrays! I decided to return to land collecting after not doing very well in the water and when i did so my luck changed greatly. The next two days and nights of land collecting (28/12/18 and 29/12/18) proved to be much more successful and i even got to meet two TFF members on the beach (coincidentally)! @Echinoid and @Tympanic bulla were also out looking, and we had a nice chat before they headed off to continue snorkelling. I then spent most of my remaining time on the beach flipping rocks and examining the pebbles up close, ultimately finishing the trip with a total of five shark teeth which i was very happy with! Carcharodon hastalis tooth as found. 24mm long. Large Carcharodon hastalis upper anterior tooth, as found at 2 am (with a head-torch) on 29/12/18. Measures 56 mm long. I had long been waiting for a tooth of this size! Carcharodon hastalis posterior tooth as found. 15 mm long. Another Carcharodon hastalis posterior as found. 13 mm long. And a small fragment of cetacean bone. Worn pieces like this are the most common vertebrate fossils at Beaumaris. Pictures continued in the next post
  24. Confirmation on cowshark teeth

    I was revisiting some of the shark teeth I've found on previous adventures in order to make a list/catalog of the vertebrate species present in my collection. I found a few teeth which I believe could come from notorhynchus or hexanchus and I wanted to confirm that with members on the forum. I was looking at some of my teeth from the spoil pits of Aurora, NC and the Peace River, FL. 1. Deep rooted specimen with what looks like what would be the first crown preserved. Found in Aurora. About 2 cm from top to bottom, 1 cm wide. 2. Unsure about this one, initially thought it was a tiger shark, but it's rather long at the base and doesn't have the curved root like your average tiger. Found on the Peace River. About 1.4 cm wide and .75 cm from top to bottom. 3. This is the one I'm least confident about, but the root is very wide. 1.4 cm wide and .8 cm from top to bottom.
  25. Venice Beach Trip Set

    The plane tickets are purchased and the sifter and 'Florida Snow Shovel' have already arrived in Cape Coral! My in-laws have a place in Cape Coral and the wife and I visit them every year in early March. Last year we went to Venice Beach and I totally got hooked on fossils and sharks teeth. Living in the Pennsylvania, I don't get down to Florida often, but I have been able to make it to Calvert Cliffs twice this winter. While I did find some very small teeth the last time (my first time) at Venice Beach, just south of the pier I am hoping to find some better spots. I am not looking for anyone to reveal any personal sites or honey holes, but I hope some forum member can chime in and and let me know some decent places to look. I know we will for sure be making a family trip to Venice Beach for a day, but I also hope to be able to steal a day on my own for fossil exploration. Any information or tips would be much appreciated. I will get a permit prior to the trip, and the in-laws gracefully took down a sifter and scoop for me when they left a few weeks ago. There is nothing like examining your finds while sipping some Wicked Dolphin Rum and sitting on the canal!
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