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Found 720 results

  1. Hello everyone! I have not posted in a while because I have not been on any trips recently. However, I just recently had the opportunity to go on a Fossil collecting tour in a Miocene exposure in VA. I was able to meet the helpful and friendly @SailingAlongToo (thanks to him I was able to learn about this fantastic opportunity). My mom, dad, and best friend spent Saturday, May 18 and Sunday, May 19 collecting fossils along a river. On Saturday, my mom found a killer posterior meg using a kitty litter scooper in a gravel bar after not finding anything for 1.5 hours. I found two crocodile teeth and some hastalis teeth around 1.5 inches. My best friend found some hastalis teeth, and my dad found a large “cookie” Fossil of a vertebra I believe. On Sunday mom found some nice hemis and an item that could not be readily identified. I found half of a juvenile meg and a posterior meg tooth. My dad found a larger gator tooth, and my best friend also found some hemis. Here are some pictures, thanks for reading!
  2. My son and I have have been finding a few sharks teeth in Galveston that have washed onto the beaches. Does anyone know the age or the formation that these teeth are washing up from?
  3. Hey fellow TFF Members! Accidentally posted this in the wrong section earlier.... Back again with another video and I'll get straight to it. I found one of the nicest megs I have found here in Florida! The way this thing was found is just amazing as well. Give it a watch when you get some time
  4. Hi so I have been hunting my favorite spot recently, and ever since I first came to this spot I have noticed a good amount of sand tiger teeth popping up, but only in this 10 foot radius. Is it possible that all of these teeth are from the same shark. They all range in similar size and I have only ever found them in this one spot. for every nice one i have pictured. I found 10 more broken ones just missing the roots.
  5. Hemigaleidae Teeth?

    G'day Everyone! I would like some help identifying these shark teeth I found in Portland, VIC around 5 months ago. These fossils are Pliocene in age and come from the Portland Limestone I believe. They have been sitting in my collection for a while and I have become increasingly interested in them. I have done some research and believe they are some kind of Hemigaleidae shark teeth. I would like to confirm this because there is very few Hemigaleidae fossils recorded in Australia. Thought I would get the community opinion. Thanks, Dan
  6. Hilton Head Hot Spots?

    Going to Hilton Head Island for vactation in July. Haven't been there since I discovered this shark tooth/fossil addiction several years ago. I'll likely charter a boat to take me out to shark tooth island in the savannah river but would love any advice on any good spots on the island itself if anyone has them. They had a large beach replenishment in the past year so I hope the hunting on the beach itself is above average and productive.
  7. Gators?

    I'm about to go to Venice FL, hopefully will find some small shrimpers and maybe a few medium sized teeth I know there aren't any gators in the ocean, but if I were to plan a trip to the Peace River or other similar locations --- would gators be a huge problem? I'm not from Florida, and I would really appreciate any advice on how to ward them away or avoid them in general (like what time they are most active, where to look before diving, etc). Thanks!
  8. Hey fellow TFF Members! Back again with another video and I'll get straight to it. I found one of the nicest megs I have found here in Florida! The way this thing was found is just amazing as well. Give it a watch when you get some time
  9. Finds from Flag Ponds in MD

    Hello! All of these are from two trips to the Flag Ponds Nature Park in Maryland I've made recently. Tried to do some identifying on my own with the Fossil Shark Teeth of the World book from Joe Cocke (ISBN 0-9715381-3-1), but there's so many to compare against that I'm not sure I'm even on the right track for the ideas that I had. And that's not even counting my few mystery teeth! Some more expert opinions than mine would be greatly appreciated. The first photo is all of the teeth that I found. Unfortunately, I seemed to have lost the little teeeeny tiny tooth when I was sorting through teeth in my identifying process, so there's now only 18. Which makes me sad, because the little one was my favorite! Handwriting translation: 1. Serratolamna ?? 2. Carcharias taurus 3. Hemipristis serra 4. Galeocerado cuvier 5. Carcharhinus limbatus 6. Alopias ?? All photos were taken beside a machinist ruler (inches, as the metric ruler refused to be found) for size comparison. I've tried to follow the guidelines for getting identification, but let me know if I need to add more photos.
  10. I've been hearing about Chippokes Plantaion State Park in Surry, VA for the last year or so. Finally got out there this weekend. Being a shell person, I was rather disappointed that the only thing one is allowed to collect at that park is shark teeth. But, they do allow something to be collected and pictures don't require more shelves to be installed in the family room. Here's a video I did f the trip: Plus a few still highlights: I I think the vultures were waiting for the cliff to fall on my head. Sun up, sundown and a beautiful day in-between The shells just carpet the beach at low tide! Look, Ma! Both valves! There was definitely more to that Ecphora. I just didn't take a picture after I pulled it out. All it was missing was the protoconch.
  11. Upcoming Trip to Summerville

    Hello friends! I am going on a trip to Summerville to go find some fossils! The problem is that I had no idea where to look. Can anyone please comment or send me some specific locations where you have had luck finding sharks teeth (megalodon specifically)? I would really appreciate it if you all would help me out! Thanks!
  12. I'm gonna be around Summerville tomorrow and I was wondering if anyone knows of any promising spots to look for shark teeth and other fossils. I actually came here a few years ago and had no luck at all, but I found out I was looking in the wrong places. I know most people don't want to give out the really good secret spots, but if anyone has any hints for someone who's just coming to town for a day, I promise I can keep a secret. Heck, you could even join me if you want. Any hints or suggestions are welcome!
  13. In an effort to give a more complete picture of life on planet earth during the age of dinosaurs, we did a post to get suggestions from TFF members about some non-dinosaur material. We got a lot of suggestions and it turned out to be a super informative post. We learned a lot and were able to begin the process of creating a better program for the kids. Just before that post, I had attended an amazing Ichthyosaur prep lab. It was found in Northern California, a few hours from hometown. Northern California is a dead zone for collecting fossils. There are some fossils to be found here but none on any private land that I know of. It was really cool to see the work being done on a Norcal Ichthyosaur and it ignited some interest on my part. i had already decided to get some Ichthyosaur fossils for our program prior to the TFF post. Our first Ichthyosaur fossil arrived today. It is a Brachypterigius extremeus vertebra from the Kimmeridge Clay of Weymouth, UK. In honor of the fossil, I will even go metric. It is nearly 7 cm and in pretty nice condition. I love it and I can not wait to add more. @JohnBrewer has some really nice Ichthy teeth for us so soon we will have a really nice section of our program for an animal I am very excited about. The second picture is of a really cool Mosasaur vertebra from Kansas that was donated by @Ramo . It is very compressed, crushed in the fossil process but that actually adds to the coolness to be honest. I love it and it was a hit with the kids in it's program debut last week. I am still learning about Mosasaurs but they will have a bigger spot in the program next school year for sure. The third picture shows a shark tooth display, croc teeth, a Mosasaur tooth, and a Pterosaur tooth. The kids love talking Pterosuars and we will some more pieces in the future. We kind of have to. They are extremely popular with kids and I want to expand on them in program. The shark teeth are Cretoxyrhina, Ptychodus, Scapanoryhnchus, and a Squalicorax. I will expand this display this summer as we add some Hybodonts to it. The Croc teeth are from HC and came from @Troodon . The Mosasaur tooth was a throw in from a purchase through one of favorite dealers. It did not take us long to add some really cool pieces and I am looking forward to adding more. Next fall we will split the dinosaur program into two presentations and that will allow us to expand on the non-dinosaurs as well as the dinosaurs
  14. INSANE Megalodon Shark Tooth Hunt

    Hey TFF Members! Got another insane video for you here! We had some friends join us for some shark tooth hunting and we struck pure gold! It was great to share the passion with good folks, and hopefully inspire their kids to be future fossil enthusiasts! Give the video a watch when you can. I'll also post a photo of some of the best teeth below!
  15. I just looked at a post that I did almost 1 year ago about Hogtown Creek in Gainesville and this post is almost exactly the same. It was a quick visit to Alfred Ring Park, about 45 minutes, and again I only found some miscellaneous bone pieces, Ray and shark teeth. The temp was hot, 86 degrees, and the water was cool- it made for a great time. On the way out, I ran into what I believe is an endangered 4 1/2 foot Florida Pine Snake, who was in exceptional shape. After a brief discussion with him, he went on his way and so did I. Here are some pics of the area, the snake and my finds.
  16. Over the past few months work has been crazy (although in a VERY good way) and I haven't had the time to post summaries of my past few trips to the Calvert Cliffs formation. Long stories short, I was able to get down to the cliffs on a few occasions between Feb-April 2019. Most of the time I was able to go when tides were good, however on my most recent trip they were horrible. I've met a lot of awesome people along the beach and developed many good friendships...in fact I think that 95% of the people I met have been extremely friendly, genuine, willing to give advice, and just plain good people, which is something I love about this hobby. I was even able to talk the wifey into coming down once...of course she loved it, and of course she found a larger tooth than I ever have. About half my trips were to Brownies and the other half were to a private site that I have access to. The beaches have changed dramatically over these few months with numerous falls and spills, which highlights the importance of keeping your head on a swivel and always respecting the cliffs. On one occasion I made the 3 hour trip just to turn around about 2 hours later because the cliffs were so unstable. Hopefully we have a dry summer, the piles get a chance to wash out, and the cliffs become a bit more stable. Anyway, enough rambling. Below are some pics of my better finds from the two sites, I hope you enjoy them. No complete Meg yet, but I hope that changes when I make another trip down next week!
  17. My family and I will be at Disney World Florida August 1-8, 2019. I would like to take a day trip to go looking for shark teeth and fossils. I have no idea where to go and am looking for someone who knows where to go and wouldn’t mind showing me the ropes. Anyone interested?
  18. Our shark adaptation education program for elementary students follows up the Cladodonts with three of the craziest looking early sharks and three that we think kids will love learning about. The Eugeneodontid "sharks" may not be sharks but they are just too cool not to teach the kids about. Bizarre is interesting and I also love talking about evolutionary extremes. The best part of these next animals is that they each allow my son to really stretch out as an artist and create some weird looking creatures. The kids will learn that Edestus were large, predatory shark-like fish that are related to modern ratfish. We will quickly cover the tooth whorl which is where the term Scissor-tooth comes from. I have been reading theories as to how the teeth were used and I think it will be fun to discuss possible feeding methods with the kids. We will not spend much time on Listracanthus because there is not much information about them. I have seen them described as being eel-like and covered in the "feather" denticles. This is one that is really about the artwork so my son is the star with this species. Can not wait to see his finished rendition. I think the kids will really love Stethacanthus. I know it is a cladodont but we separate it in the presentation. The Anvil Shark is a wild creature. The anvil shaped, denticle covered spine, patch of spine on its head, and the whip-like projections from the pectoral fins are adaptations that are open to debate. Asking open ended questions with this species will be more fun than giving the kids theories. What do you think the spines were used for and what do you think those whips are all about? The kids will guide the presentation about Stethacanthus. While we wont be adding any additional Cladodont fossils any time soon, I do hope to add either Caseodus or Campodus to our collection before the end of spring. I like the Eugeneodontids as artistic subjects for my son so we will pick up more of these fossils as we progress. Our presentation fossils Pic 1- Edestus heinrichi. This is an Illinois coal mine fossil, dated to between 360-320 mya. Another personal favorite. These are not common and it is pretty cool to be able to show this one to students. Pic 2- Listracanthus. A "feather" denticle from the Pennsylvanian-Desmoinesian in Iowa. Not the best example as it is difficult to see but a good photograph will help. Still it is cool just to have the Feather Shark in the program ! Pic 3- Stethacanthus altonesis. One of the two teeth we have from the Caney Shale Formation in Oklahoma. Again, it is just too cool to have Stethacanthus fossils. I do not know how rare they are or anything but it is just such a freaky little creature.
  19. Had a quick walk down the beach the other day and it was actually pretty successful! Not many finds but they were all pretty sizeable! The largest one was half buried underneath the Johnny Mercer pier. It looked whole, and man I wish it was! Any ID ideas for the cusped tooth corner?
  20. Hey TFF Members! Last Tuesday after work I was experiencing fossil withdrawals and needed to get my fossil fix! I didn't have a ton of time, but I took my camera to the creek and set out to find some fossils! I ended up finding some pretty incredible stuff. I documented some of what happens before getting to the creek as well. Hope you all enjoy it!
  21. Kamp Ranch Texas Ptychodus Teeth

    I purchased some Ptychodus teeth and I can not determine the exact ID on my own. They are smaller than P. whippeli or P. mortoni teeth I have and bigger than the single P. anonymous tooth I have though that is the species I originally though, and still think these are. They are from the Kamp Ranch section of Eagle Ford in Texas. I consulted a very well put together ID guide here but am still just not sure what I have, other than nice Ptychodus teeth lol Any help would be appreciated.
  22. Looking for tips regarding Joshua Creek and Charlie Creek! Both located in SW FL near Arcadia. I've heard good things about both. Just curious about where to park, any success stories, "don't do this," etc. Thanks!!
  23. First dry land haul

    Tried fossil hunting on dry land... found some great stuff! One piece stuck out, don’t recognize it. Provided a close up, second pic!
  24. Last week I was on holiday in the Netherlands/Belgium for a short time and I had the chance to visit the area of Antwerp to find some shark teeth. Too bad the weather wasnt good (I think it rained the entire day). Nevertheless I found some teeth and I have to say that I am kinda satisfed with the result! I almost sieved the whole day so my body still hurts a bit The material I searched in comes from the Miocene, Pliocene and was washed up from the extension of Churchill dock in Antwerp. Here are two "in-situ" pictures: A nice tooth on the sifter: Pictures of the nicest teeth: A nice dolphin tooth with enamel (4 cm long): A dolphin ear bone: (a little bit more than 2 cm long) An Isurus retroflexus tooth (3 cm long): And an 4.2 cm long Cosmopolitodus hastalis: (I am not sure if I determined this one right ...) I think I will post some more detailed pictures of other teeth in the next days! Thanks for watching
  25. Texas Fossils Identification

    Hey guys, I was wondering if ya'll could help me identify these. All were found in Texas to the best of my knowledge. I have what I believe to be the phyla of each but I'm not totally sure so take it with a grain of salt. Photo 1: Bryozoa Photo 2: Hemichordata Photo 3: Bryozoa Photo 4: Chordata, this is obviously a shark tooth I think but I'm unsure of the species
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