Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Teeth'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • retired blog
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • Between A Rock And A Hard Place
  • Rudist digging at "Point 25", St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria (Campanian, Gosau-group)
  • Prognathodon saturator 101

Calendars

  • Calendar

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Found 1,202 results

  1. Since the weather is (finally) behaving and the Peace River water level has now stabilized at a depth where South Florida fossil hunters can get in and get their hunt on, Tammy and I found a free day in our busy schedule and planned a day trip to Arcadia to try our luck on the Peace River again. If we do not drive over and spend the night in a local hotel, hunting on the Peace River involves an early morning wake-up call at the painfully early hour of 3:00 AM. We're all packed up and leaving the house at just around 4:00 AM with a long quiet drive through mostly empty highways--up the Florida Turnpike to the aptly named Beeline Hwy which makes a beeline straight northwest for the town of Okeechobee at the northern tip of Lake Okeechobee (the large lake that looks like it was hole punched out of the map of Florida). A stop for something approximating breakfast at the 24-hour Micky D's in Okeechobee (bring a jacket if you go because the AC is set for 60F ) and then it's a straight show west on State Road 70 into Arcadia. When we arrive we make a quick stop for a bag of ice for our cooler and a few snacks for the day. Then we roll into Canoe Outpost to fill out our paperwork and wait for the bus to take us to the put-in location. As we had a free day to make this trip on a Tuesday, Canoe Outpost is far from busy--in fact we are the only ones there save two employees who had to come in early to tend to our canoe rental needs. Today's hunting area of choice is on the lower half of the normal full-day rental. Usually, we put in at Brownville Park some 8.5 miles upstream of the Canoe Outpost dock and we stop at various locations along the way. We wanted to focus on some spots downstream from their half-day put-in location at the primitive campground area that is owned by Canoe Outpost (called Oak Hill). We've wanted to get dropped off here on some weekends when we only wanted to hunt along the lower 4 miles of the river above Arcadia but usually they have others going to Brownville on the 8:00 AM run and we just end up getting put-in there. We spend the first hour paddling the 4.5 miles down to the half-day put-in. This time we were lucky--nobody else was signed-up to go out at 8:00 AM so they were accommodating enough to put us in at the halfway point and save us an hour of paddling. We enjoy the peaceful paddling down the river looking for birds and spotting gators along the banks but the thought of saving an hour of paddle time was too good to pass up--more time for sifting. We made it down to the spot where we had found some nice armadillo bits two weeks before--a tooth and an astragalus from Holmesina septentrionalis a two meter beastie clocking in at around 250 kg. According to Dr. Hulbert specimens from this species are pretty rare in South Florida and the astragalus that we found last trip is earmarked for the FLMNH next time we are in Gainesville as the museum does not have any specimens of this bone from this species in its collection. We were hoping to possibly find some additional Holmesina bits though that was a long shot at best. We poked around the site chasing down areas with nice chunky gravel hoping to find some nice items and though we struck out extending our Holmesina finds we did come across a few nice items. On only the first handful of screens, a familiar triangular shape appeared in the sifting screen. Though the root was a bit dinged, this meg tooth that topped out at just about 3 inches is just shy of the 3.25 inch size that most teeth seem to max out at in the Peace River. A little while later a beautifully shaped smaller meg (just under 2 inches) turned up in the sifting screen. Here are some in situ (well, in sifter anyway) images of those teeth at the moment they revealed themselves. A little while later (after many smaller shark teeth and broken megs--fraglodons) we turned up one of the larger Carcharhinus teeth I've seen come from the Peace River. It was a nice surprise to see such a large example of a requiem shark tooth. No more interesting shark teeth turned up though we did find quite a number of the normal nickel and dime (size) teeth which will end up in an ever growing jar of teeth on display in the family room. Two other novelties helped to make the day a successful hunt in the record books. I turned up a tiny unerupted tooth that I believe to be tapir peccary though I've never seen one with six cusps (two small ones off one side). EDIT: Fixed ID, see below. As with many of these teeth the hollow nature of the tooth and fragile roots mean that usually only the enamel crown are recovered--at least this pretty little thing is solidly in one piece. The other tooth is a bit of a mystery. I'm sure @Harry Pristis will likely recognize this as it looks reasonably distinctive. The tooth looks like it has a complete crown (no parts missing) but it only has a trace of the roots left. Looking at the photos I can see that there are cracks forming on this tooth and it looks like it is ready to disarticulate into a puzzle of pieces. I think I'll be attempting to consolidate this item a bit with some B72. There is less than a month to go before the official start of rainy/hurricane season in June. Hoping to find some time in my schedule to make it back out to the river a few more times. It's been an extremely shortened season this year but the few finds we have been able to make have been enjoyable. Cheers. -Ken
  2. Cetacean? teeth from the Yorktown

    hi all, Here are three teeth from the Pliocene Yorktown at LC. When found, I was told "pilot whale", which hasn't helped much. I do believe that they are from a tooth cetacean though. Could anyone hazard a guess as to genus/species? thanks in advance
  3. Teeth ID (solved : horse incisors)

    Need help identifying these teeth/tusks (4cm long) I found in Rhodes (Greece). Since the area was a landslide caused by waters flowing over different layers of sediment (clay, marl, sandstone) the resulting mix contained both sea (shells) and land (pine cone impressions) fossils I cannot give a clear estimate of age, just place it somewhere within the upper Pliocene - lower Pleistocene boundaries.
  4. Coming home from a meeting on Saturday I stopped by a planned future addition in my friends neighborhood. I only had about 20 minutes and wasn’t too high on the prospects of the spot, so I thought at the very least it would be a nice hike in nature. Well this turned out to be a very fruitful 20 minutes. I found my first ever shark teeth not in a creek or near a lake, just right out in an open field. I knew they were out there somewhere, but they just always seem to be wherever I’m not lol. Actually worked out quite well too. I’ve been needing an extra Cretalamna tooth (first photo) for my shark tooth display I use in my program. And who would have guessed that I’d actually find one. Now maybe next time I’ll find a big ol Cretoxyrhina waiting out there for me next time haha.
  5. London Finds

    Hello everyone! My wife and I were walking down on the Thames Riverbank today (Not looking for fossils for once lol) and we looked down and instantly saw some bones. We just picked these up because they have teeth in them. Like I said we’re not here for that and are in dress clothes. I’m curious about what animal they’re from, what time period and of course the legality of even picking them up. Does anyone know if we can fly with them? I need to know because we head back to Texas relatively early tomorrow. Any input is much appreciated. Thank you.
  6. A few recent trips to brownies. Still have not found the big ones, but I think I am getting better at spotting them. I attached a pic, and had a few request for comments. Can someone provide additional info on the bone, broken tooth, the one object with the cut down the middle (does not feel like wood), and the 3 tonged tooth, which to me looks like a wisdom tooth. Any info appreciated. To give an idea on size the bone is probable about 3 to 4 inches. Thanks,
  7. Need help identifying teeth

    I'm not even sure what these are, but I was kayaking near Cherry Point and found these while walking on a sandbar. They seemed really unique so I tried to look them up and haven't found anything.
  8. I have found a ton of these. Does anyone know what they might be?
  9. Hello Everyone, My friends and I are visiting New Orleans this weekend and I was wondering if there are any places nearby that we could find any shark teeth? Thank you you for any help!
  10. Ray teeth? Pt2

    I need help identifying this piece of dental plaque from a ray. Any ideas?
  11. Which is of highest quality?

    I recently saw these teeth for sale online. Which of these in everyone’s opinion is of highest quality and easiest to ID? And which are your favourites? Also am I correct when I say the lines on the second tooth are seen in some ceratosaurus teeth? These teeth are from the Lourhina of Portugal.
  12. Carnivorous mammal skull ID

    Could someone please help me identify this mammal skull? It has no associated geographic information.
  13. Ray teeth?

    I need help identifying this piece of dental plaque from a ray. Any ideas?
  14. Hi, Folks. Thank you so much for the feedback on my first posting of teeth! Apparently there were more than a few crocodiles in the Agadez area of Niger, back when it wasn't desert! I'll post the next set, and follow that up with a posting of another very large fossil from the same area. I truly appreciate the education I'm getting on here! Rob @Troodon @LordTrilobite @jpc @-Andy-
  15. Big Brook Finds!

    Hi all here are some finds I cannot identify from Big Brook. Please let me know what you think! Any help is appreciated. First up I believe is some kind of pleistocene horse tooth fragment? But I am not sure. Thought it was a ratfish jaw frag at first from the other side, but it's like nothing I've seen. Below, this is what looks to be a fish tooth of some kind, but it seems to have some of the root attached. So no hole visible at the bottom. Slightly larger than a quarter in length!
  16. teeth from the Sahara - Agadez, Niger

    Hi, All. I finally managed to photograph all my teeth with a scale, and am hoping for someone with a lot more knowledge than me (ie: just about anyone on this site!) to tell me what I've got. I've got them divided into 6 different sets of teeth, and tried to photograph them with a bit of logic (teeth in a row, teeth flipped over to show other side in a row, bottom of teeth displayed one at a time in order, etc.). I'm trying to learn the difference between types of teeth (crocodile vs. spinosaurus vs. m-something, etc.), so if there are any common clues, I'd really appreciate the guidance. I was told that the bottom of croc teeth are more perfectly round, while others are more oval in appearance, but that's the limit of my knowledge. I also don't know the difference between "regular" crocodile fossilized teeth, and those of the "super-croc" that has been discovered in the same region of Niger. I've also got two that I can't make heads or tails out of, that I'm hoping for clarity regarding. I guess I'll start with those.... I'll try and space my submissions out, so as not to take up too much time and space. As always, thank you so much for your help and guidance! Rob @jpc @Troodon
  17. Portuguese teeth

    A forum member recently offered these teeth. One as partial torvosaurus or megalosaurid and the second as dromaeosaur. How rare are they and what is the exact ID if possible?
  18. Howdy there everyone. Wanted to show off my newly crafted Cretaceous Sharks of Texas display. Like my good buddy@fossilsonwheels, I run a traveling educational program called Dino Bo. I stay in the Dallas/Fort Worth area so I really wanted to create a display to show kids what kind of awesome sharks lived here and encourage them to get outside and find their own. A very special thanks to my friend Roger Farish who donated several of these teeth to help this become a reality.
  19. Orlando Hunting Advice

    Hello, I am looking for a few general locations close to home to start my search. Would little wekiwa river be a good place to start?
  20. Teeth ID

    I was sorting through my collection from decades ago. I have these teeth from the Lance Cr formation. I always assumed they were Triceratops but haven't found any confirmation. They don't match the photos on the internet. So I thought I would ask the experts.
  21. Florida teeth, bone, and vertebrae

    I have had the delight of hunting the Peace river and it's Tributaries for a few years now. Time was taken to combine my finds and I discovered some unknowns that I hope someone can help me with!! Rib. It does not appear to be Dugong. Any chance of a broad classification?? These look like bullas, but so different than whales. I was told horse. Could this be correct?? Unknown Teeth:
  22. Miocene Canine teeth from Florida

    A question for fossil mammal collectors in Florida. On a popular auction site I see Miocene canine teeth (canine and pre-molars) from Florida listed as "Bear Dog". By bear dog I would assume a Amphicyonid. But the species is listed as Desmocyon matthewi, a Borophaginae. From the Wang book (Dogs), the Amphicyonids are now thought to be closer to Ursids (bears). Is "Bear Dog" used as a generic term for Miocene fossils dogs in Florida? Any references to Miocene dogs in Florida? Thanks.
  23. Here is another piece of my dinosaur collection - this time material from Eurasian countries. Unfortunately don't have any Triassic or Early Jurassic material, so let's begin with Middle Jurassic (Bathonian) of Itat formation, Krasnoyarskyi region, Russia. Theropods are the most common dinosaurs from there, yet their teeth rarely exceed 15 mm in length. Here is my largest one - could be from Kileskus aristotocus, an early Proceratosaurid (ancestor of Cretaceous tyrannosaurs) and the only described dinosaur from this location. Here are a bunch of Kileskus teeth I had before There also likely were more theropod species, similar to contemporary Chinese Dashanpu formation - methriacanthosaurids (equivalent to Sinraptor), megalosaurids and ceratosaurs. Some teeth I have or had that could be megalosaurids due to bulkier shape and finer serrations (all around 1 cm). In addition I have some specimens from diverse herbivores - Stegosaurids Long-necked sauropods (Mamenchisauridae), possible embryonic teeth Heterodontosaurid fang tooth, 5 mm (huge for this species!)
  24. I'll be staying in Annapolis MD for a few days in August. I'm looking for a guide in the Calvert Cliffs area. If you know of anybody or if you'd be willing to guide, please let me know. I'm an amateur fossil collector in CA. Yesterday I dug at Ernst Quarry in Bakersfield & had a couple nice finds. Thanks for your help.
  25. Help IDing

    Need help IDing these two teeth. Found them next to each other, west georgia, between Columbus and Macon. Look like great whites but it seems so far from an ocean and I have no idea how long teeth stay white, assuming they were fossils that washed up in the recent rain.
×