Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Tyrannosaurus Rex'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • blogs_blog_99
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • retired blog
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Books I have enjoyed
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • Between A Rock And A Hard Place
  • Rudist digging at "Point 25", St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria (Campanian, Gosau-group)
  • Prognathodon saturator 101
  • Ever put a foot in your mouth

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

  1. Abstraktum

    Germany builds a T-Rex for the US

    I just stumbled upon this news and find it kind of weird, that a german museum puts together an original T-Rex for someone from the USA. Does anyone have any information on this specimen? why not give it to an US Museum? Too expensive maybe? I mean shipping it to Germany and back to the USA wont be cheap. CLICK Article is only in German, but Google Translate does the job. (in the picture, the T-Rex that is standing here in front of the bones is Rocky, the Museums own original T-Rex) Here is a tour through the muse
  2. Marshall, C.R., Latorre, D.V., Wilson, C.J., Frank, T.M., Magoulick, K.M., Zimmt, J.B., Poust, A.W. 2021 Absolute Abundance and Preservation Rate of Tyrannosaurus rex. Science, 372:284-287 OPEN ACCESS PDF GOOGLE NEWS FEED
  3. ThePhysicist

    Hell Creek Tyrannosaur Denticle Variation

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Comparison of Tyrannosaur denticles (serrations) from the Hell Creek Formation. All of the images are set to the same scale Some differences are likely associated with position in the mouth and/or feeding wear. So, this may not be a perfect illustration of purely ontogenetic variation. The adult T. rex denticles are from an unknown position and carina (being from a tooth fragment), the juvenile T. rex denticles are from the distal carina of a right (rear?) maxillary tooth, and the infant T. rex denticles are from the distal carina of a posterior tooth. The Nanotyrannus
  4. I read somewhere in a paper by Jack Horner, that G-Rex was said to be around 16 years old when it died using bone histology. In the same paper it said that it was shown by LAG intervals that G-Rex would've continued to grow for 2-3 more years had it not died. This means that the infamous G-Rex was a sub-adult. Jack Horner's Paper: http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.515.6451&rep=rep1&type=pdf This got me curious on how big exactly was G-Rex? What was its height, length, and weight? I tried googling the answers for these but to not avail as p
  5. ThePhysicist

    Juvenile T. rex tooth tip

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Tyrannosaurus rex Hell Creek Formation Garfield Co., MT, USA Note: From the right maxillary of a juvenile animal, but still has adult qualities like a robust tip and denticles.
  6. ThePhysicist

    Juvenile T. rex mesial serrations

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Tyrannosaurus rex Hell Creek Formation Garfield Co., MT, USA Note: Juvenile animal
  7. ThePhysicist

    Juvenile T. rex distal serrations

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Tyrannosaurus rex Hell Creek Formation Garfield Co., MT, USA Note: Juvenile animal
  8. insun

    T.rex skull?

    Greetings, I have now received some pieces of bone, it should be pieces of bone from the Tyrannosaurus' head ... it should be one individual ... if anyone can confirm or refute it, or even know which part of the skull it is. ..I would be very grateful ... for some pieces, I already have an idea where they fit ... I photographed every piece of bone 5 times ... you can see a part of the surface of the bones at each one .. I just don't know if I'm wrong, so I'd rather ask here, the more erudite ones ... thank you for your time
  9. insun

    T.rex Tooth?Please ID

    Please identify this tooth, unfortunately I do not have more photos available, nor the location of the find, or any information, but I think that identification is possible anyway ... maybe the color, the guidance of the curve will reveal something ... thank you for your time.Luk
  10. A new "T-Rex" tooth just showed up on our favorite site. It is not a Tyrannosaurus rex tooth however but a more common and far cheaper Carch tooth. We know this because of its more blade-like morphology, its slender profile, its shape, its smaller denticles and the sand on the base I already notice multiple bids on it and I have no doubt the price would escalate as many hopeful collectors would try their hands on getting a cheap T-Rex tooth for themselves. For anyone looking to buy a true T. rex tooth, there are several factors to take note of: 1) Thi
  11. I obtained a nice Tyrannosaurus Rex tooth from the Lance Creek Formation of Wyoming. It was a good opportunity to try my hand at restoration. The tooth was around 80% complete, with some of the root missing and a dent near the tip. I only wanted to restore the latter part. Pretty good job, I think.
  12. Squirrelman91

    Hell Creek Claw ID - Dakotaraptor?

    Hi everyone! I have a large claw from the Hell Creek Formation of Harding County, South Dakota that I was hoping to have help identifying. It is large enough that I initially believed it stood a chance at being tyrannosaurid, but it seems a bit more compressed than tyrannosaur claws I’ve worked with in the past - particularly on the lower ridge. The ventral surface of the claw is also distinctly flat rather than rounded, which seems unusual. Could this be a Dakotaraptor claw or is that just wishful thinking? Large Anzu perhaps? It is right around 1.75 inches across the length of the claw (sorr
  13. ThePhysicist

    T. rex posterior dentary tooth

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    A high-quality replica of Stan's posterior right dentary tooth. About 4.5" in length.
  14. ThePhysicist

    T. rex ontogenetic comparison

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Two teeth from Tyrannosaurus rex at different growth stages. The adult is a replica of a posterior right dentary tooth of Stan. The baby/juvenile is also a posterior tooth (about 6 mm long), found in the Hell Creek Fm. (more info: http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/collections-database/chordata/dinosaurs/baby-t-rex-tooth-r1992/). It could also be a dentary tooth based on the wear patterns, but I'm not sure.
  15. ThePhysicist

    T. rex posterior dentary tooth mesial carina

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Posterior dentary tooth replica from Stan the T. rex (11th from front). Note there is a slight "twist" of the mesial carina in this specimen.
  16. ThePhysicist

    T. rex posterior dentary tooth distal carina

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Posterior dentary tooth replica from Stan the T. rex (11th from front).
  17. ThePhysicist

    Baby Tyrannosaurus rex

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Posterior baby/juvenile T. rex tooth. Hell Creek Formation Carter Co., MT, USA Fossil in TFF collections: http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/collections-database/chordata/dinosaurs/baby-t-rex-tooth-r1992/ This tooth is also very similar to a few in the collection of @Troodon: http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/57402-my-jurassic-park-hell-creeklance-tyrannosaurs/
  18. ThePhysicist

    Baby Tyrannosaurus rex Tooth

    Identification: Originally listed as a Dromaeosaurid tooth, I suspected it was from a Tryannosaurid. Upon receiving the tooth, I contacted a few paleontologists to get expert opinions. Their conclusion was that the tooth was likely from a baby/juvenile Tyrannosaur. Since the only Tyrannosaurs in the Hell Creek Formation are Tyrannosaurus rex and Nanotyrannus lancensis (or only T. rex if N. lancensis is a young T. rex), and considering the cross-section of the base of the tooth, this must be from a baby Tyrannosaurus rex. This tooth shares many qualities with adult teeth, a fact which
  19. I was out yesterday doing a final hunt before the snow sets in here in Montana on the Judith River formation and found this claw along with this vertebra, no other bones around so possibly from the same animal. I have found theropod claws that are much smaller and this one is huge when compared. I searched for the tip but sadly couldn't find it. I assume because of the size it would be a tyrannosauroid but not certain. Can it be determined to be a toe claw or hand claw? Is the vertebra identifiable? @patrickhudson
  20. From the album: Dinosaurs

    A juxtaposition of the bases of two juvenile Tyrannosaurid tooth crowns from the Hell Creek Formation. Nanotyrannus: Dawson Co., MT Tyrannosaurus: Carter Co., MT
  21. ThePhysicist

    Tyrannosaurus rex serrations collage

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    To me, serrations are such a fascinating tool. They were independently evolved many times in many different animals. They concentrate force into smaller points (increasing the pressure = Force/Area) so that the thing being bitten would break or cut along the line of serrations. They also are great for "sawing" through things such as muscle. T. rex definitely made great use of this adaptation. Topmost (greyscale) image from "Physical evidence of predatory behavior in Tyrannosaurus rex:" https://www.researchgate.net/publication/249649164_Physical_evidence_of_predatory_behavior_
  22. ThePhysicist

    Stan T. rex tooth replica (2)

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Closeup shot of the distal serrations.
  23. ThePhysicist

    Stan T. rex tooth replica (1)

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    A high-quality replica of Stan's 2nd maxillary tooth. About 11.5" in length. Displayed with a 3D-printed stand I designed.
  24. ThePhysicist

    T. rex tooth chunk

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    A small piece of (probably) rex tooth from the Lance Creek Fm., WY. Shown next to a replica for comparison.
×
×
  • Create New...