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  1. Rockwood

    Ordovician algae

    These were found in a boulder used as rip rap along a rail bed here in Maine. I've never seen rock like it exposed in cuts along the route, so it may have been transported some distance. These are old photos, but I've donated the best examples to a local museum (Bates Museum, Hinkley, Maine) and the label on it was destroyed. Unfortunately I can't find the post, but I'm quite sure it was identified as a calcareous algae known from the Ordovician. Can anyone help me identify it so that I can inform the folks at the museum. It's a small museum and they don't really have a paleontologis
  2. SilurianSalamander

    Marine plants/terrestrial plants/macro algae?

    Found in the stone steps at estabrooke park quarried from the Devonian Milwaukee formation.
  3. Stromatolites are potentially present in every geologic period. Show any if you got 'em. The goal here is to represent every period, and every stage/epoch if possible, including subdivisions/periods of the Precambrian. These can be posted in no particular order. Any and all are welcome to post multiple examples from any period/epoch. I'll start with a specimen from the Pennsylvanian: Sniabar Limestone, Kasimovian/Missourian Stage, Pennsylvanian Kansas City, Missouri, USA The front side has been p
  4. terminatordiego

    Microfossils? from Chile in thin section

    Hello again my good friends. I did a petrographic thin section in a marine consolidated sediment, and i found some elements that seems to be microfossils. It is worth noting that these sediments are in a mandatory-way marine since in all of them are marine bivalves fragments. I also was unsure if put this here or either in the microfossil zone of the forum, leaving it here because it is an ID question. For each I'll leave a views in PPL and XPL. Hopefully someone may be able to recognize them at least broadly, and tell apart them from being forams, big diatoms or even algae. Greetings from Chi
  5. A partial decalcified specimen from the Upper Ordovician. Scale bar: 5mm The image on the left shows 2 views of one mould, the image on the right shows 2 views of the other mould. Into the 2 moulds (expecially in the left one) you can see that the specimen has, almost sunk on its surface, a piece of ramose bryozoan (decalcified) and an echinoderm columnal (decalcified). We don't know if it could be some sort of sponge or calcareous algae, or other...
  6. SilurianSalamander

    Calcareous algae?

    Found while splitting fossiliferous rock
  7. Missourian

    Mystery Fossils (Pennsylvanian)

    For nearly twenty years, I've collected some strange fossils from a unique Pennsylvanian deposit in northeast Kansas. I've been pondering them to this day, and I'm still drawing a blank. I first found this slab: The bold segments caught my eye. I then noticed that they have a branching habit. I assumed they were sponges, but then I found this: This one is also segmented and bifurcated, but it forms a nearly continuous surface. Perplexed, I looked at them up close. They seem to form thin (0.5 mm), leaf-like sheets (i.e. t
  8. Hardly anybody ever talks about the Cambrian fossils of the southern midcontinent (USA). They're super-underappreciated. Show us what you've got! Here's one to start us off: Thorax and pygidium of a trilobite, possibly Orygmaspis, typically referred to as "Orygmaspis cf. Orygmaspis llanoensis" but probably a different species altogether. Note the two pairs of macropleural spines marking the final thoracic segments. Davis Formation (late Cambrian: Furongian), south side of Highway 8, St. François County, Missouri.
  9. Scylla

    Real Living Fossils

    There have been other microbes freed from ice or salt before, but if these are indeed alive they shatter all records for oldest living things by about 600 million years!!! https://www.sciencealert.com/830-million-year-old-microorganisms-found-trapped-in-australian-rock/amp
  10. OregonFossil

    Possible Algae?

    PBFossilAgae05.tif Pittsburg Bluff Formation (near Mist, Oregon) Late Eocene or early Miocene. I am finding a lot these tubular items in the matrix. Still waiting from the adapter for my good camera, this is from a 5 mpx camera. Since it is a marine environment, perhaps this is some type of Algae? On my 27" screen the yellow ring part has fuzzy hairs protruding. This was taken with a 5 mpx camera and a 10X objective.
  11. UPDATE: These seem to just be weirdly incomplete cross-sections through ordinary cylindrical meroms. ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ This weekend in the Kimmswick Limestone in eastern Missouri (Pike County) I saw plenty of receptaculitid algae, mostly of genus Fisherites. But one cross-section has a feature I've never seen before: a fringe of what look like erect spines on the external surface. Can someone point me to a reference for understanding this feature functionally and/or taxonomically? I've looked in the usual places but I d
  12. mbarco

    A block of...?

    Location: n-e Italy. Probably Permian or Carboniferous. It's a fossil? Algae?
  13. Cynic

    I want to define fossil

    The fossil was found near the Mukhavets River, Belarus, Brest. Length ~ 6-7cm (~ 2.5 inch) whole piece. If I registered here, I will be impudent: you can recommend a book (100 -200 pages), an introductory course in fossils.
  14. citrine.colubrid

    Fossil Algae?

    I've got this big hash plate that I collected last year and I somehow didn't notice this thing poking out until now. It looks like an algae to me. Found in SW Wisconsin in the platteville formation.
  15. Hello everyone, I have posted about this fossil before but I was not able to get it Identified. I have decided to create a separate topic for it because I am quite interested in if this is really what I initially thought it was. The fossil is from Eifel (Middle Devonian) and on one side there are a bunch of Crinoids columnals, but upon flipping it over I noticed this darkened branching structure on the rock, to me it looked very reminiscent of certain algae, although I have never seen anything like that from the Devonian so it's probably something else. So my question is:
  16. fossilizator

    Kaliningrad fossils

    Hello Dear Friends! This is my first topic on this forum. Hooray! I work in museum and sometimes go on the Kaliningrad beach of Baltic sea and search some fossils. I'am not paleontologist and i need help to definition of them. THe last time i found some algae but i'am not sure. Place was in a few meters from cliff on beach. p.s. can i add my other find in this topic or should create new?
  17. dalmayshun

    florida barge canal

    a friend and I traveled to the florida barge canal on Saturday. it is a 4 hour trip for us. besides the usual finds, my friend found this, and we were wondering if it looks like algae to anyone else, besides us. lol. thanks. ( second photo is of my best finds of the day, still needing a final cleanup....also found a 4" sand dollar that broke getting it out of the bank....and a 5" thick, 6' long section of broken sand dollar edges all in hardened stone...ugh. )
  18. pachy-pleuro-whatnot-odon

    Dealing with marine algae

    Hello everyone, I found the below ichthyosaur vertebra on the beach at Wimereux two weeks ago. It had obviously been lying there for some time, as it was covered in green algae and barnacles. Based on the advise of various friends and the fact this rock seems to hard and massive to work through using just my Dremel, I'll be leaving the fossil in its matrix. However, I do want to clean it up from the algae and barnacles. As such, I used a 1:2 dilution of 14° household cleaning vinegar and a couple of sturdy brushes to remove most of the algae (dipping the br
  19. Megalodoodle

    Algae Removal

    I have a few specimens that I recently collected from a river. The best are covered in dried algae that needs removal. Does anyone know how to remove the algae?
  20. pefty

    oddball Pennsylvanian ?alga

    Anyone seen this species or similar? Found in Pennsylvanian spoil piles of central Illinois (near Peoria). Is it part of some kind of alga? Not my find and not my specimen, so these photos are basically what we have to go on. More broadly, can anyone here recommend a Treatise-style taxonomic book detailing known algal heads / macroalgae in the fossil record? Thanks.
  21. I recently aquired this Glossopteris. It has a green coating which looks like algae. How do I remove this without damaging the fossil ?
  22. Help request! I am putting together a tool for judging rock age based on very crude, whole-rock, hand-sample observations of fossil faunas/floras -- the types of observations a child or beginner could successfully make. I view this as a complement to the very fine, species-level identifications commonly employed as index fossils for individual stages, biozones, etc. Attached is what I've got so far, but I can clearly use help with corals, mollusks, plants, vertebrates, ichnofossils, and the post-Paleozoic In the attached file, vibrant orange indicates times in earth history to com
  23. Budaologist

    Unrecognized algae

    Hi guys, I would like to know if you can recognize this algae fossil. It is Cenomanian in age and associated with microbialites. My first guess is cyanobacteria. Thanks!
  24. Carboniferous320

    Paleozoic algal matting?

    While hiking through a desert area just southwest of Tucson, AZ. I found these interesting layered rocks. Over the course of an afternoon I came across a couple more spots where these types rocks were strewn over relatively large areas. Many of the pieces would fit inside a square inch or the palm of your hand, while many others were a few feet long/wide. I showed these to a local geologist and he called them stromatolithic Paleozoic limestone – evidence the area was once covered by water and these represent the layers of algae, probably in the form of algal matting that existed there, dat
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