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Found 346 results

  1. Tiny Crinoid Ossicles and Worms 9.JPG

    From the album 1925 Body & Trace Fossil Collection - Ocean

    Once you start looking at this specimen the tiny Crinoid Ossicles just keep appearing. Worm holes have not been vacated.
  2. Tiny Crinoid Ossicles and Worms 8.JPG

    From the album 1925 Body & Trace Fossil Collection - Ocean

    Once you start looking at this specimen the tiny Crinoid Ossicles just keep appearing. Worm holes have not been vacated.
  3. Tiny Crinoid Ossicles and Worms 7.JPG

    From the album 1925 Body & Trace Fossil Collection - Ocean

    Once you start looking at this specimen the tiny Crinoid Ossicles just keep appearing. Worm holes have not been vacated.
  4. Tiny Crinoid Ossicles and Worms 6.JPG

    From the album 1925 Body & Trace Fossil Collection - Ocean

    Once you start looking at this specimen the tiny Crinoid Ossicles just keep appearing. Worm holes have not been vacated.
  5. Tiny Crinoid Ossicles and Worms 5.JPG

    From the album 1925 Body & Trace Fossil Collection - Ocean

    Once you start looking at this specimen the tiny Crinoid Ossicles just keep appearing. Worm holes have not been vacated.
  6. Tiny Crinoid Ossicles and Worms 4.JPG

    From the album 1925 Body & Trace Fossil Collection - Ocean

    Once you start looking at this specimen the tiny Crinoid Ossicles just keep appearing. Worm holes have not been vacated.
  7. Tiny Crinoid Ossicles and Worms 3.JPG

    From the album 1925 Body & Trace Fossil Collection - Ocean

    Once you start looking at this specimen the tiny Crinoid Ossicles just keep appearing. Worm holes have not been vacated.
  8. Tiny Crinoid Ossicles and Worms 2.JPG

    From the album 1925 Body & Trace Fossil Collection - Ocean

    Once you start looking at this specimen the tiny Crinoid Ossicles just keep appearing. Worm holes have not been vacated.
  9. Tiny Crinoid Ossicles and Worms 1.JPG

    From the album 1925 Body & Trace Fossil Collection - Ocean

    Once you start looking at this specimen the tiny Crinoid Ossicles just keep appearing. Worm holes have not been vacated.
  10. This is getting to be a regular visit of mine, but this may be the last time for this garage sale that was being held by the daughter of two older ESCONI members who collected rocks and fossils all over the US and Canada. They had so much stuff, it could not be put out at one time, thus the weekly Saturday visits to see what was new. But before i put up the multiple picture heavy posts that will follow, I want to show a couple pictures of how some of the stuff was arranged. Today I was again got to meet the great Fossil Forum and ESCONI member Rich @stats, we spent time talking and revisiting items to make sure that we did not miss anything. Here are a picture of Rich searching for something good. Here are a couple pictures of the sale. Now before I post the items that I picked up today I want to show a couple pieces of Mazon Creek (MC) fossils that I picked up from the daughter after I went for an arrange showing of MC fossils on Tuesday. I wanted to see what they had since the were never put out before and I knew that others had set up similar visits in the past with her. I picked up the following pieces for $40.00 and though I do not generally buy MC fossils, I do love Annularia, and fertile ferns and I did get some. I also picked up Neuropteris, Alethopteris, Pecopteris and the Leech Coprinoscolex ellogimus. Now to my surprise, I picked you a couple pieces that struck my fancy and I sent a PM to Jack Witry @fiddlehead who gave me some surprising ID's to plants that I did not have in my collection. This piece I did not know the ID of this piece, but I did like the way it looked and I got it for $2.00. Jack stated that it "is a rare sterile example of Myriotheca scaberrima. He stated that an example of this species will be in his new Mazon Creek Flora book that will be coming out soon. This other piece I thought was a fertile Pecopteris and I just happened to send him a picture of it and my ID was wrong. Jack stated that it is an exceptional example of a fertile Diplazites unita. He stated that one of the interesting mysteries of the Mazon Creek flora is why 2 out of 3 examples of this taxon fertile. He further stated that no other fern except for some very rare taxa is anywhere near that ratio. Jack thanks again for your expertise and I can't wait to get your new book. Starting with the next post I will show some of the great stuff that I picked up today.
  11. Barely a month had gone by since my last trip to New Mexico and Colorado, but I already had plans for this trip in the works. Primary focus this time, which was a solo trip, was fossil collecting, visiting well known sites that have been on my radar for quite some time. I flew out to Salt Lake City and drove directly to Kemmerer, WY. My first stop there was Fossil Butte National Monument: Here is a view of the visitors center (free admission) and the surrounding barren, but awesome landscape that surrounds it:
  12. Back to the ditch

    I mentioned here about a week ago that I had discovered a promising new exposure in that Kimmeridgian ditch at the side of the road which I thought I'd pretty well exhausted over the last few years. I also said that I would probably go back again soon and true to my own word, I did. This time I took the car. I spent about 2 hours there and made some more good finds. They are all out of a concretionary horizon in the hypselocylum zone of the Lochen Formation sponge facies. It looks like there could very well be more to be found, so I guess I'll be going back there again before the snow sets in. Ataxioceras (Parataxioceras) hypselocylum, the ammonite which gives the zone its name. Parataxioceras sp. Streblites tenuilobatus together with a partial Ataxioceras sp. Taramelliceras sp. Taramelliceras sp., Lingulaticeras sp. and a Laevaptychus obliquus, part of the jaw aparatus from an ammonite.
  13. Fossil Road Trip - Georgia, Texas

    Both my brother and I celebrated graduations this year - my brother graduated from college and I graduated from law school. In celebration of our graduations, we decided to take a 13-day road trip to see some of the United States after I had taken the bar exam but before I began work. Our journey ultimately took us through Atlanta, New Orleans, Houston, San Antonio, Austin, Oklahoma City, St. Louis, Dayton and Pittsburgh, before returning home. Our days were jam-packed, with us often not arriving at a hotel until 9/10pm, but along the way we did find some time to make a few quick stops to collect some fossils in Georgia and Texas. My brother is not a collector, but I was really excited to try to find some examples of the infamous Georgia trilobites, Texas echinoids and Texas ammonites. I want to thank @BobWill, @smt126, @facehugger, and @JamieLynn for answering my innumerable questions about Texas fossils. We ultimately did not have enough time to check out all of the places you suggested, but I will certainly store the knowledge for my next trip - hopefully in cooler weather. Our first stop was at Tibbs Bridge in Chatsworth, GA. Having heard the rumors about the potential illegality of the site I was a little worried when we arrived. We could not initially find parking and when we pulled off, we picked the wrong spot. The homeowner we parked near came out yelling at us about collecting beneath the bridge and threatening to call the police. Having driven all the way from New Jersey I was not yet ready to give up on the trip. We decided to pick another spot to park and given that my brother doesn't collect, he waited in the car in case something happened. We could not stay at the site for longer than 90 minutes, so I tried to find as much as I could. As a funny aside, I was soon joined by another group of collectors from Georgia, one of whom had recently spent time in my hometown in New Jersey. Small world! I was hoping to find some better preserved trilobites, but I had to ultimately settle with some nice impressions and a couple of smaller fragments of exoskeleton. I did find one large trilobite that still had all of its exoskeleton, but it was fractured and I could not put it back together even at home. I was able to keep the impression of the trilobite though. All of what I found were Aphelaspis brachyphasis. And the large trilobite whose exoskeleton was simply too damaged to repair
  14. Hello, I recently acquired some fossils from the Vallecillo member of the Agua Nueva formation. The Agua Nueva Lagerstätten is famous for its perfectly preserved fish and marine reptiles. It is late cenomanian in age about 90-93 million years old. I got two large ammonites from one of my trips to Mexico. I was wondering if someone can identify it to the family, and possibly the genus level. They are preserved in a finely bedded shale. This one one is the largest one it is about 8 inches long.
  15. Looking for fox hills formation Ammonites that are unprepped. Got plenty of uk Yorkshire Ammonites, with the odd few uk Dorset Ammonites too
  16. My son went on a canoe trip a few days ago and even though he took most of the fossils to his house he did drop some stuff off at my house. I wish he was on this forum so he could tell you folks how he wrapped his cheap plastic canoe around a rock in the middle of the river! Ha!!! Quite the story I assure you! Here is some stuff Im helping him out with but that kid sure has one heck of alot of Placenticeras ammo's!!! RB Here is one of the prettiest ive seen. Gunna take some work to save this one and has a super nice keel!!! My son said I could have this one. What a kid huh? My hope was that the rest of this concretion was loaded with more ammo's? This was the only one in the rock. Very purty but not good enough for this guy. He also found some lobster concs which surprized him,, and me too! Here is one Im putting back together that may turn out purty good? I take a toothbrush and water to clean all the pieces up and then its just a matter of gluing the puzzle back together. Not as easy as it sounds. I dont let even a grain of sand get in the way. A grain of sand can cause a lot more trouble than one thinks!!! Here ive glued on a piece to the main chunk and also two smaller pieces back together and then those will be glued on. And WAAALAAA,,,, all back together. Now its just wait for glue cure and it will be ready to go. This will be one of my winter projects. This lobster will be Hoploparia or Paleonepherops?
  17. My girlfriend, Valerie and I planned a two week trip to New Mexico and Colorado to visit friends, see scenery, and attend the Peach Festival in Palisades. Of course fossil collecting would be a part of it. I spent a full day with PFOOLEY outside Albuquerque in the Puerco Valley hunting ammonites in the Carlile Member of the Upper Cretaceous Mancos Shale.
  18. Hi everyone! Last week I went camping for 3 days with my cousin and her parents in Lyme Regis (first time on the jurassic coast) and managed to persuade them to join me in a little fossil hunting! On the first day we went to Lyme Regis beach and to cut a long story short, we had no luck. all I found was half of a compressed ammonite in the shale which I then realised I lost when we got back to the campsite! I wasn't bothered though as the shale is so crumbly that it would not have lasted very long anyway. We did however have a really nice time on the beach and saw lots of huge ammonites in the rocks and the ammonite graveyard which was amazing. The next day was allocated to the museum and looking around the fossil shops. Of course I would have loved to have spent the day searching for fossils, but I only tagged along to this holiday! On the last day we went to Charmouth beach in the hope of better luck. My hope was diminished when we saw the hundreds of people all traipsing the beach looking for fossils. A lot of them had hammers and seemed to be hammering indiscriminately at rocks however, and most of those looking on the beach were just walking and staring at their feet. It became obvious quite quickly that this was not an effective method at this site and so I spent that day on my hands and knees. Belemnites were abundant (I really should have stopped picking them up but I couldn't resist) as were tiny ammonite fragments. I only found 3 nicely exposed whole ammonites though and one encased in rock (I might buy some tools to prep it myself - just got my university scholarship money, why spend it on fees!) And then came the excitement: all the previous week I had been preoccupied about this trip to the Jurassic coast and the odd chance of finding an ichthyosaur vertebra, without ever thinking I would. But, a few hours into the trip, what should I see laying on the ground by my feet? An ichthyosaur vertebra!! I just grabbed it and had to sprint back to my cousin down the beach to show her! It more than made up for not finding a larger or more complete ammonite. All in all we had a great time, I can't wait to go back! Some of my nicer finds Some bivalves My only nice whole ammonites Ammonite fragment filled with crystal, there's a lovely ring of golden pyrite showing around the crystal too Crinoid stems The ichthyosaur vertebra!
  19. How to ID Fossils

    So I've been collecting fossils for a few years now, i have a bunch of ammonites, sea urchins, mollusks and plants but I have no idea where can i learn what exact species they are. I'm wandering if there is any books or sites to which you can point me so I can gather some knowledge . I know there is an ID section in this site but I want to be able to tell what species I have found, myself. By the way I'm from Europe.
  20. I have recently begun my journey into fossil prep, i'm using a dremel electric engraver as it seemed to be the best cheap tool. I have several ammonites from Yorkshire within nodules - these are very hard in the centre and consist of pyritised sediment. It is taking a very long time with the dremel using tungsten-carbide point, so just asking for any advice on how is best to try and get through these very hard bits. Cheers in advance!!
  21. Fossil News Summer 19 issue is available

    The Summer 2019 issue of Fossil News features the paleoart of Jimi Catanzaro, an article about late-Cretaceous pterosaurs in Cuba, more on that ammonite in amber you've been hearing so much about, an exclusive excerpt from Enrico Bonino’s new book about fossil medusozoans and how primitive algal mats helped preserve them, and a whole lot more! tinyurl.com/fnsubscribe
  22. Hi, Can anyone please help with the latest and safest info for beach access directions at Port Mulgrave, and Runswick Bay. I’ve never been to either and all info I find on line seems a bit outdated, confusing and causes concerns. My wife is coming with just to show slight interest and keep company. We are both mid 60’s and mobile amateurs. I’m concerned about ladder and rope access references and any related safety / risk aspects of getting onto the beach in the right place at the right time. Are there options for access to either location. Any directions or pointers would be warmly welcomed. This is something of a bucket list trip to quell a schoolboy interest, so I’d like to survive to remember it. Perfection would be to find a vertebrae, but very happy with a reasonable Ammonite. I’ve checked tide times, we are going early October with a high tide @ 09:00. Accommodation already booked nearby to allow 2 mornings on a beach. I’m assuming one location each day. All advise, comments and options would be warmly received. Regards, Bob
  23. Serbian ammonites ID

    Hi guys! Can anyone help me to identify these Ammonites? I am not good at identifying Ammonites so, if someone could help me out, It would be much appreciated! I didn't found them btw, my friend did. They we're found at Stara planina Mountain in Eastern Serbia. The location where they we're found is called Oreovica. I don't know anything about that location. This is all i have from the pictures. Hope someone will help out. Good luck! Darko
  24. Our fossil hunting holiday trip

    Natalie81 and I are back from our fossil hunting holiday. On the 20th of july we left for a long camping and fossil hunting week in the UK, we took the ferry in Calais to Dover, drove to Porthsmouth and the 2nd ferry to our 1st stop: 5 days on the Isle of wight. the 1st day on the Island, we prospected the beaches on the the south west of the isle where the Wealden cliffs could deliver some dinosaur remains.We had no luck this time. the 2nd day we went to the southern part of the Island where we could find some cenomanian ammonites in the chalk. This time we had better luck, and we found lots of them and even a few nautiluses. There was a sealion in the water not far from where we were prospecting, but since it was yawning a lot I don't think he was very interested in our activities Day 3 was a stop in Yaverland, here we found some hybodont remains and a possible pterosaur tooth ( we will know for sure after the prep ), in the afternoon we went a bit further to Whiteclif bay where we found a few echinoids. Day 4 Back to those Wealden cliffs in search for dinosaur material, again in vain, but we did se al those impresive Iguanodon foottracks at Hanover point. later on the day we tried to find the lobster bed near Atherfield, but only a few parts were accesible, but I found a nice big lobster in situ, it came out in a few pieces. I had super glue in my backpack, so I glued the parts back together and stuffed the fossil safely away in a box with soft paper. It is still in that box now, so I hope it wil still be ok when I start prepping it. Day 5: we had a meetup with a local colector to prospect the beaches on the north of the island, those were Oligocene deposits and we did find a lot of turtle fragments, a few croc scutes and even a few croc teeth Day 6: we had our ferry back to the mainland of the UK, from there we drove further to the jurassic coast. In the afternoon we went on the Beach between Dorset and Lyme Regis, but the beaches were full of tourists looking for fossils, so the finds were poor. Day 7: we visited Eype, and Golden cap, not far from Dorset, again verry few finds due to overprospected beaches, but we did find a decent ammonite. In the evening We visited the town of Lyme Regis and the birthplace of Mary Anning Day 8: this time e went east of Dorset, still very few fossils to be seen, but still multiple good belemnites , some of them still in the matrix. Day 9: time to pack the tent and drive back to Dover, we still had time before taking our ferry back to France so we did a quick stop in Folkestone. 2 hours of prospecting in the gault clay did deliver 2 decent ammonites and lots of ammonite fragments, belemnites and inoceramus shells. I didnt take a lot of pictures of the fossils we found yet, but we took a few ones in the field. more pictures will follow when we start unpacking and prepping the fossils from this week. Shipping to Dover: vieuw on the camping from Wight: of to the beach: no fossils to be seen Lots of beach to prospect: Still looking for bone in the shingle: sunset on Wight: to the cenomanian chalk: ammonites the Sealion: possible pterosaur tooth: footprints Oligoceene deposits: A vieuw on Wight before we leave: Dorset and Lyme regis: Ammonites everywhere Mary Anning:
  25. Cowboy Pass, Utah Ammonites

    Picture Heavy! On my first day in Millard County, I started out at the U-DIG quarry. I got lots of trilobites, but nothing too spectacular. (I'll share them in a separate post as there is quite a bit of prep work to do!) Honestly, I got a bit bored at the quarry. Sure, I enjoy digging fossils, but the challenge just isn't there. So after four hours, I decided to drive through Marjum Pass to Cowboy Pass. This is the view exiting Marjum Pass. (That is a truly epic drive on its own, but I didn't stop at any of the fossil sites in there!) Almost there! For those that don't know, distance and time behaves a bit strangely when solo in the desert. Finding road signs is even stranger. If you do decide to do a Millard County run, you'd better be able to use a topo map and a compass because you cant trust GPS maps and mobile phones have no service out here. I found that even the road atlas was untrustworthy. It took me three months of research to pinpoint the exact locations of the exposed Thaynes Formation areas of the Pass. Doing the homework paid off as I was able to find the "easy" site almost immediately. I'm not really into giving out exact locations, but I will say "The Book" is correct and accurate and that this photo shows the landmark referred to in an old Millard County rockhound guide. I know I could have just asked folks where they were, but a big part of this hobby for me is the satisfaction of confirming my research skills. One can easily drive to the "easy" site, but the other two (actually three...) require a pretty rugged hike. However, as you are about to see, it is well worth it. I found my first in the overburden some hack left behind. In fact, at the easy site I didn't even need to use any tools as whoever was there last ignored dozens of nice specimens! I will also add, I hope it wasn't someone from here...as I cleaned up all your %#!$%^&* trash for you. Three full bags of garbage and you left a virtually brand new gad pry under the pile of beer cans. Thanks. I needed a gad pry later! Anyway, Here are some of the specimens I collected from the various sites. Most of them need lots of prep work. Here's a few as they were found: I'll post more pictures at a later date as there is a lot of prep work to do on many of the specimens! So, in short, Cowboy Pass is well worth the excursion. Be prepared to do some real work, and study up on the site before you go. Also, don't be a jerk and leave a mess like the one I found...that is how public lands get closed to the public.
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