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  1. connorp

    Tiny Pennsylvanian Ammonoids

    Over the past year I've I found two tiny ammonoids from a site in the Carbondale Formation (Middle Pennsylvanian) of Illinois. Both measure approximately 5mm in diameter. The first specimen below showed no details of the exterior of the shell, which I believe are necessary in identifying these. This week I found a second specimen (maybe a different species) which does show the suture pattern. I'm hoping that this specimen is identifiable. Part Counterpart Does anyone recognize the species? Thanks!
  2. During an afternoon break I found a dozen or so promising concretions at an outcrop of Fayetteville shale. I'm thinking of going the freeze/thaw route as my history of hammering concretions is a but hit or miss. Curious as to the opinion of the forum on the best technique. Also, should I consider setting a couple aside and try to get whole fossils by remove the matrix? Thanks in advance.
  3. I took this photo of an ammonite fossil from the Late Cretaceous (Turonian) Ladd Formation of the Santa Ana Mountains in Orange County on display at the fossil collection inside the Lewis Center for Applied Sciences at Orange Coast College earlier this week
  4. cngodles

    Pennsylvanian Ammonoid

    I've had this specimen sitting in my "I'll get to it later" pile since last year. I've learned a lot about Cephalopods the past year, one of them being the differences between Nautiloids and Ammonoids. Upon re-inspection of this yesterday, I noticed the shell lines, but more importantly the suture lines caught my eye. These do exist here, but I would call them pretty rare to find. Not being an expert, I would consider Wellerites or Schistoceras, but these are based on quick comparisons using a Pennsylvanian Cephalopods of Ohio book I have. I started to clean up the rock using an ai
  5. Bonehunter

    Ammonoid Neoglyphioceras?

    Good evening everyone! Hope everyone is safe and healthy! Found this little (15mm) "ammonoid", that, to the best I can find is an example of a ridged ammonite Neoglyphioceras sp? (Unklesbay Common fossils of Missouri 1973). It was found in Pennsylvanian Winterset limestone in Kansas City. Is this a fair observation/guess? Thanks for any input! Bone
  6. Fossildude19

    Before and After prep.

    From the album: Fossildude's Purchased/Gift Fossils

    Lituites lii (Middle Ordovician ammonoid) before and after prep with air abrasives. The dolomite may have been a bit harsh, but some more matrix could be removed. I will have to take some time with baking soda to try to remove the excess. Not too bad, though.

    © © 2014 Tim Jones

  7. JulianoLPD

    Ammonite ID? Perisphinctes?

    Hi there guys, I got this ammonite as part of a set from Madagascar. I would like to know if this is a Perisphinctes. What caught my attention is that it seems to be more "larger" than the regular Perisphinctes I'm used to, at least. Let me know your thoughts.
  8. AstroRaptor56

    What is this ammonoid

    Here’s something I found in Michigan, it’s an ammonoid of some type but I thought it was too wide to be a goniatite, I could be wrong though.
  9. Hi there folks, Just need to know if I'm seeing this right. This is a piece from Madagascar I recently received. At first I didn't give much attention to it, but today i noticed the three small markings on the center of the piece. My question is: Would that be the reminiscent of the siphunculus of a Nautiloid specimen? Piece is from Madagascar. Thanks in advance, Juliano
  10. Enafter

    Fossil IDs (if possible)

    I like collecting fossils, but I usually am not sure what my finds are. Please, could you help me identify these fossils? I noted down some possibilities down below. 1 - could be a late Albian ammonite from central Serbia, but I am not entirely sure. Acquired in Serbia. 2 - Found at Southerndown, Wales. Could it be a tree root or something in the region of that? It has a cross-hatched pattern if you look closely. 3 & 4 - A shell I found at Penarth, Wales but I am not entirely sure what it is called. 5 - A bone I found in the mud at Tites Point, Severn, Glouceste
  11. Max-fossils

    Ammonoids from Carniol

    Hi everyone, Should've posted these a LOOONG time ago, but me being the lazy guy I am I forgot to do so till now Anyways, here goes. These were all found by me (/my family) in the Carniol clay banks in southeastern France. They are (heavily for some) pyritized. They are from the "Gargasian", Aptian stage, Cretaceous. Would love to hear the species name of them. Genus is still fantastic. Thoughts? Thanks in advance, Max #1:
  12. Abed H.

    Small ammonoid from Jordan

    I found this on the surface of the land next to my house. when you expose it to the sun, you can see crystals reflecting light
  13. Hello there! I visited @Malcolmt yesterday and he was nice enough to clean up some of my stuff from Penn Dixie (mid-Devonian), including the specimen below. I'm not exactly sure what it is, so I was hoping that someone out there will be able to help me with identifying this little guy, which I think is either a gastropod or a ammonoid - what do you think? These are all pictures of the same specimen, just from different angles. And it's pretty small - only 5mm across at its widest point. Maybe @DevonianDigger can help? Thanks for your help! M
  14. andreas

    Discotropites sp.

    From the album: alpine triassic Ammonoids

    Discotropites sp. from Triassic/upper Carnian "Hallstatt" limestone. Zone of Tropites subbullatus/Tuvalian II.
  15. Dpaul7

    Timor Ammonoid 1.JPG

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Ammonoid SITE LOCATION: Timor Permian (298.9-251.902 million years ago) Ammonoids are an extinct group of marine mollusc animals in the subclass Ammonoidea of the class Cephalopoda. These molluscs are more closely related to living coleoids (i.e., octopuses, squid, and cuttlefish) than they are to shelled nautiloids such as the living Nautilus species. The earliest ammonites appear during the Devonian, and the last species died out during the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Cephalo
  16. Dpaul7

    Timor Ammonoid 1.JPG

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Ammonoid SITE LOCATION: Timor Permian (298.9-251.902 million years ago) Ammonoids are an extinct group of marine mollusc animals in the subclass Ammonoidea of the class Cephalopoda. These molluscs are more closely related to living coleoids (i.e., octopuses, squid, and cuttlefish) than they are to shelled nautiloids such as the living Nautilus species. The earliest ammonites appear during the Devonian, and the last species died out during the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Cephalo
  17. Dpaul7

    Timor Ammonoid 1.JPG

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Ammonoid SITE LOCATION: Timor Permian (298.9-251.902 million years ago) Ammonoids are an extinct group of marine mollusc animals in the subclass Ammonoidea of the class Cephalopoda. These molluscs are more closely related to living coleoids (i.e., octopuses, squid, and cuttlefish) than they are to shelled nautiloids such as the living Nautilus species. The earliest ammonites appear during the Devonian, and the last species died out during the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Cephalo
  18. Dpaul7

    Timor Ammonoid 1.JPG

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Ammonoid SITE LOCATION: Timor Permian (298.9-251.902 million years ago) Ammonoids are an extinct group of marine mollusc animals in the subclass Ammonoidea of the class Cephalopoda. These molluscs are more closely related to living coleoids (i.e., octopuses, squid, and cuttlefish) than they are to shelled nautiloids such as the living Nautilus species. The earliest ammonites appear during the Devonian, and the last species died out during the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Cephalo
  19. I have a hunch about these, but I felt it best to get some more seasoned input. The first two are trilobite partials. I'm tempted to call the one on the right just another small Isotelus, but the segmentation doesn't appear quite right. Found in the Lindsay Fm. The second image is a matter of dispute (or so I was told) with one expert stating it is an ammonoid, and another stating it is a gastropod. Found in the Whitby shale. About 5 cm in diameter.
  20. Dpaul7

    Goniatites Ammonite a.jpg

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Goniatites Fossil SITE LOCATION: Morocco TIME PERIOD: Middle Devonian to Permian - (390-139 million years ago) Data: Goniatids, informally Goniatites, are ammonoid cephalopods that form the Order Goniatiida, derived from the more primitive Anarcestida during the Middle Devonian some 390 million years ago. Goniatites (goniatitida) survived the Late Devonian extinction to flourish during the Carboniferous and Permian only to become extinct at the end of the Permian some 139 million years later. All goniatites possessed an external shell, which is divided internally into chambers
  21. Dpaul7

    Goniatites Ammonite a.jpg

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Goniatites Fossil SITE LOCATION: Morocco TIME PERIOD: Middle Devonian to Permian - (390-139 million years ago) Data: Goniatids, informally Goniatites, are ammonoid cephalopods that form the Order Goniatiida, derived from the more primitive Anarcestida during the Middle Devonian some 390 million years ago. Goniatites (goniatitida) survived the Late Devonian extinction to flourish during the Carboniferous and Permian only to become extinct at the end of the Permian some 139 million years later. All goniatites possessed an external shell, which is divided internally into chambers
  22. I have wanted this book for a while...slowly piecing it together. All links are to downloadable pdfs. Enjoy. Front Matter Part I Conch 1 Describing Ammonoid Conchs ..... Christian Klug, Dieter Korn, Neil H. Landman, Kazushige Tanabe, Kenneth De Baets and Carole Naglik 2 Ammonoid Color Patterns ..... Royal H. Mapes and Neal L. Larson 3 Ammonoid Septa and Sutures ..... Christian Klug and René Hoffmann 4 Cameral Membranes, Pseudosutures, and Other Soft Tissue Imprints in Ammonoid Shells ..... Kristin Polizzotto, Neil H. Landman and Christian Klug
  23. andreas

    Monophyllites simonyi (HAUER)

    From the album: alpine triassic Ammonoids

    Monophyllites simonyi (HAUER) from the Hallstatt limestone of Austria. Size is 8 cm. Found in the upper part of the austriacum zone.
  24. andreas

    Trachyceras cf. hekubae MOJS.

    From the album: alpine triassic Ammonoids

    Trachyceras cf. hekubae MOJS. from Triassic/Carnian/Austriacum Zone, Hallstatt limestone of Austria. Diameter is about 9cm. Below is a fragment of Neoprotrachyceras thous (DITTMAR). This ammonoid and the orange colour of the rock indicates the austriacum zone.
  25. andreas

    Sirenites sp.

    From the album: alpine triassic Ammonoids

    Sirenites sp. from the Triassic/Carnian, upper aonoides zone. Hallstatt limestone of Austria. Size is about 6cm. Good to see on this specimen is the characteristic feature of Sirenites s. s. that each single rib ends in two venter nodes.
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