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Found 10 results

  1. The Green River Formation is one of the most well-known fossil sites in the world, occupying present-day Colorado, Utah and Wyoming. This Lagerstätte has been noted for its well-preserved fish fossils, as well as numerous invertebrates, plants, and sometimes even reptiles and birds. Green River fossils are Eocene-aged, at 53.5 to 48.5 million years old. Thankfully, not only are Green River fossils attractive, they also remain affordable to the casual collector. Allow me to present my humble collection. Crocodile tooth Borealosuchus sp. Southwest Wyoming
  2. oilshale

    Erismatopterus levatus (COPE, 1870)

    Erismatopterus is only known from Lake Gosiute and Lake Uinta deposits. It is one of the rarer Green River fish fossils, except in some mass mortality zones. Erismatopterus belongs together with its close relative Amphiplaga to the family Percopsidae within the order Percopsiformes. Amphiplaga is best distinguished from Erismatopterus by its dorsal fin, which has three hard spines (the first one is very small) followed by 9 or 10 soft rays. Erismatopterus usually has two hard spines followed by 6 or 7 soft spines. Amphiplaga can reach up to 15cm with an average length of about 10cm wh
  3. oilshale

    Amphiplaga brachyptera COPE, 1877

    Amphiplaga is one of the rarer of the Green River fish fossils, making up some 1% of the total from Fossil Lake, its only known location. Amphiplaga belongs together with its close relative Erismatopterus to the family Percopsidae within the order Percopsiformes. Amphiplaga is best distinguished from Erismatopterus by its dorsal fin, which has three hard spines (the first one is very small) followed by 9 or 10 soft rays. Erismatopterus usually has two hard spines followed by 6 or 7 soft spines. Amphiplaga can reach up to 15cm with an average length of about 10cm while Erismatopt
  4. oilshale

    Amphiplaga brachyptera COPE, 1877

    From the album: Vertebrates

    Amphiplaga brachyptera COPE, 1877 Middle Eocene Kemmerer Wyoming USA Length 8cm
  5. holdinghistory

    Quick fish prep

    Quick 18 inch layer prep I just finished. Decided to do this one with a scalpel instead of scribes because some of the fish was pretty flaky and I was afraid that the air from the scribe would blow pieces off even if I was careful with the tip. Being an Amphiplaga I didn't want to risk that. Took about 30 minutes and was a relaxing project.
  6. Bone guy

    Amphiplaga?

    I stumbled across this green river formation association piece. It's got a leaf, a huge coprolite (not in this photo) and what was labeled as a Knightia. Problem is I'm 99% sure this is not a Knightia! Look at the caudal fin, the dorsal fin, and the skull.....to me this looks like an Amphiplaga!
  7. Fossil-Hound

    Possible rare fish id

    Fossil Forum Friends, I put some fish up for possible trading on the trades section and wise @Fossildude19 reached out to me with a possible identification as a Amphiplaga brachyptera. This species makes up less than 1% of the known fish collected in the Green River Formation. Upon closer inspection it appears to be that species or it might just be a disarticulated Knightia. I really can't tell as I'm not a fish expert. Please provide your input. If it is a A. brachyptera can someone please PM me with a quote for preparing the fish and once it's prepared I'll get it framed at Michael's cr
  8. FossilDudeCO

    Green River - June 3-4, 2017

    On June 3rd and 4th I ditched my regular hunting grounds for the opportunity to meet up with a forum member @Seve78 at one of the Pay to Dig quarries in Kemmerer, Wyoming. Tom chose to spend Saturday at Warfield Quarry and Sunday with me at American Fossil (AKA Fish Dig) which is run by our very own TFF member @sseth Tom was an absolute pleasure to dig with and he filled his suitcase with literally tons of treasures to take home, I would meet up again in a heartbeat! I arrived at 9:30am on Saturday and spent about 4 hours helping to prep the site for Tom on Sunday. I
  9. moriniboy

    Amphiplaga Bracyptera

    From the album: Nigel's album

    Green River Formation, Wyoming. Fish is 2.4 inches long
  10. oilshale

    Amphiplaga brachyptera Cope, 1877

    Amphiplaga is one of the rarer of the Green River fish fossils, making up some 1% of the total from Fossil Lake, its only known location. Amphiplaga belongs to the family Percopsidae within the order Percopsiformes. The Order Percopsiformes is a small order of North American freshwater fishes that includes three families: Amblyopsidae (cavefishes); Aphredoderidae (pirate perches); and Percopsidae (trout-perches). Closely related to neither trout nor perch, trout-perches have characteristics of both the trout and perch families. They exhibit characters of the salmonids, such as an adi
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