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Found 13 results

  1. This bat is now on its way to Fossil Butte National Monument to become part of their collection. We found it this summer in our quarry. They will be preparing it over the summer and you can stop by and see it for yourself.
  2. merikling

    What is this, a bat??

    Unsure what this is found it rock hunting in southwest Iowa neat the river on a friend's property.Looks like a bat in utero petrified
  3. gigantoraptor

    My collection

    Hello all, I recently saw a whole lot of collections on this forum, and they were all beautifel. Now I cleaned up my room (what's a hell of a task to me, I spended 8 hours) and I deceided to take pictures of the nicest part of my fossil and mineral collection. It's by far not as nice as most members here, but I still have decades to get a nice collection . It's a bunch of everything older then the cenozoicum, because I find it hard to choose what group of fossils I want to collect, trilobites or dinosaurs/ reptiles. Dinosaurs are pretty hard to get here without paying high import a
  4. From the album: Vertebrates

    Archaeonycteris trigonodon Revilliod, 1917 Middle Eocene Lutetian Messel near Darmstadt Hessia Germany As far as I know, four bat genera with a total of 8 species are known from Messel: Palaeochiropteryx tupaiodon and P. spiegeli, Archaeonycteris trigonodon and A. pollex, Trachypteron franzeni, Hassianycteris messelense, H. magna and Hassianycteris? revilliodi. The genus Palaeochiropteryx is the most common and smallest bat from Messel with a wingspan of around
  5. From the album: Vertebrates

    Palaeochiropteryx spiegeli Revilliod 1917 Eocene Lutetian Messel near Darmstadt Germany
  6. These are a few of the pdf files (and a few Microsoft Word documents) that I've accumulated in my web browsing. MOST of these are hyperlinked to their source. If you want one that is not hyperlinked or if the link isn't working, e-mail me at joegallo1954@gmail.com and I'll be happy to send it to you. Please note that this list will be updated continuously as I find more available resources. All of these files are freely available on the Internet so there should be no copyright issues. Articles with author names in RED are new additions since January 10,
  7. Thought I would share this here as well as in Blake's post. You can stop by the Coliseum show in Denver and see it in person at (FossildudeCo ) Blake's booth. @FossilDudeCO Icaronycteris Index, found at our American Fossil quarry in August, 2017! Icaronycteris Index is one of the oldest bat species on the planet. It lived some 51 million years ago in the Eocene epoch in Wyoming. Icaronycteris was a primitive bat, emerging very early in the age of mammals. Modern bats have only a single claw on their first digit, but Icaronycteris also had another one on the second digi
  8. Prepped by transfer method (Toombs, Harry; A.E. Rixon (1950). "The use of plastics in the "transfer method" of preparing fossils". The museums journal. 50: 105–107.) Palaeochiropteryx tupaiodon with partly preserved wing membrane and fur. Lit.: Revilliod, P. (1917): Fledermäuse aus der Braunkohle von Messel bei Darmstadt. Abhandlungen der Großherzoglichen Hessischen Geologischen Landesanstalt zu Darmstadt, 7 (2), 162-201. Richter, G. & Storch, G. (1980): Beiträge zur Ernährungsbiologie eozäner Fledermäuse aus der "Grube Messel". Natur und Museum, 110 (12), p. 35
  9. Prepped by transfer method (Toombs, Harry; A.E. Rixon (1950). "The use of plastics in the "transfer method" of preparing fossils". The museums journal. 50: 105–107.) Palaeochiropteryx tupaiodon with preserved wing membrane and ears. References.: Revilliod, P. (1917): Fledermäuse aus der Braunkohle von Messel bei Darmstadt. Abhandlungen der Großherzoglichen Hessischen Geologischen Landesanstalt zu Darmstadt, 7 (2), 162-201. Richter, G. & Storch, G. (1980): Beiträge zur Ernährungsbiologie eozäner Fledermäuse aus der "Grube Messel". Natur und Museum, 110 (12), p. 353-367.
  10. ted coulianos

    Bat Jaw

    thought I'd share this little gem; Pleistocene bat jaw from a place called Cavetown, Maryland; limestone cave deposits full of bones. this lower jaw was intact, however I have another one that I had to stich together under a microscope; hope the picture shows suffucient detail; has very tiny & delicate 3-cusped teeth.
  11. ted coulianos

    Bat Jaw Redux

    Apparently what I thought was a bat jaw from a Pleistocene cave deposit turned out (as jpc pointed out) to be the mandible of a fossil shrew. This prompted me to revisit another specimen that I think might be closer my original i.d. I think it matches closely to other specimens found at the same locality http://www.indiana9fossils.com/vertebrates/Bats.htm This particular specimen is missing a few teeth unfortunately, unlike the shrew jaw which was more complete; had to perform a little micropaleo repair on it, too, since it was in 3 pieces. I know I've got another vial of bones & tee
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