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Found 31 results

  1. Fossil Sea Urchin Spines.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Fossil Sea Urchin Spines SITE LOCATION: Pungo River or Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Sea urchins or urchins, archaically called sea hedgehogs, are small, spiny, globular animals that, with their close kin, such as sand dollars, constitute the class Echinoidea of the echinoderm phylum. Sea urchins have globe- to flattened-shaped bodies covered with spines. They are non-aggressive marine animals found all over the world. They live in shallow, rocky bottoms, or hide in sandy cervices. Human contact with sea urchins is either accidental or intentional. People accidentally step on them in shallow surf, or intentionally pick up the urchins, unaware that they must handle the spines with care to avoid injury. Sea urchins have two types of venomous organs - spines and pedicellaria. Spines produce puncture wounds. Pedicellaria are small, delicate seizing organs that lie between the spines and release venom when they attach to an object. A puncture injury from a sea urchin can cause swelling and redness around the area, which may lead to severe pain and infection. Multiple deep puncture wounds may cause fatigue, weakness, muscle aches, shock, paralysis, and respiratory failure. Death may occur. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Echinodermata Class: Echinoidea
  2. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Physogaleus contortus (Shark) Teeth SITE LOCATION: Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Physogaleus is a small genus of prehistoric shark that lived from the Eocene to Miocene epochs. Physogaleus are only known from their fossil teeth and isolated vertebra. It has teeth similar to the modern tiger shark, but smaller. Physogaleus was actually thought to be a type of tiger shark (Galeocerdo). However, due to the many smaller differences in the shark teeth, it has been moved to its own genus. Physogaleus teeth are smaller than the tiger sharks, they also do not have the heavy serrations, and are slender and can be twisted toward the crown. This indicates they probably had a diet of bony fish, similar to the living sand-tiger shark. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Chondrichthyes Order: Carcharhiniformes Family: Carcharhinidae Genus: †Physogaleus Species: †contortus
  3. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Physogaleus contortus (Shark) Teeth SITE LOCATION: Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Physogaleus is a small genus of prehistoric shark that lived from the Eocene to Miocene epochs. Physogaleus are only known from their fossil teeth and isolated vertebra. It has teeth similar to the modern tiger shark, but smaller. Physogaleus was actually thought to be a type of tiger shark (Galeocerdo). However, due to the many smaller differences in the shark teeth, it has been moved to its own genus. Physogaleus teeth are smaller than the tiger sharks, they also do not have the heavy serrations, and are slender and can be twisted toward the crown. This indicates they probably had a diet of bony fish, similar to the living sand-tiger shark. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Chondrichthyes Order: Carcharhiniformes Family: Carcharhinidae Genus: †Physogaleus Species: †contortus
  4. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Physogaleus contortus (Shark) Teeth SITE LOCATION: Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Physogaleus is a small genus of prehistoric shark that lived from the Eocene to Miocene epochs. Physogaleus are only known from their fossil teeth and isolated vertebra. It has teeth similar to the modern tiger shark, but smaller. Physogaleus was actually thought to be a type of tiger shark (Galeocerdo). However, due to the many smaller differences in the shark teeth, it has been moved to its own genus. Physogaleus teeth are smaller than the tiger sharks, they also do not have the heavy serrations, and are slender and can be twisted toward the crown. This indicates they probably had a diet of bony fish, similar to the living sand-tiger shark. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Chondrichthyes Order: Carcharhiniformes Family: Carcharhinidae Genus: †Physogaleus Species: †contortus
  5. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Hemipristis serra (Snaggletooth shark) Tooth SITE LOCATION: Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Hemipristis is a genus of weasel shark, family Hemigaleidae. It contains one extant species, the snaggletooth shark (H. elongata), as well as several extinct species. Hemipristis has two distinct type of teeth in each section of its jaw. The ones on the upper jaw act like knives, cutting through the flesh of the prey, while the pointed ones on the bottom act like forks, spearing the prey and holding it down. Because this shark was poorly studied in the past and its top and bottom jaw teeth differ to such a great degree, its top and lower jaw teeth were assigned to a separate genus in the past. Hemipristis serra - An extinct species from the Oligocene-Miocene of Florida, South Carolina, and other areas on the Atlantic coast. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Chondrichthyes Order: Carcharhiniformes Family: Hemigaleidae Genus: Hemipristis Species: †serra
  6. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Hemipristis serra (Snaggletooth shark) Tooth SITE LOCATION: Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Hemipristis is a genus of weasel shark, family Hemigaleidae. It contains one extant species, the snaggletooth shark (H. elongata), as well as several extinct species. Hemipristis has two distinct type of teeth in each section of its jaw. The ones on the upper jaw act like knives, cutting through the flesh of the prey, while the pointed ones on the bottom act like forks, spearing the prey and holding it down. Because this shark was poorly studied in the past and its top and bottom jaw teeth differ to such a great degree, its top and lower jaw teeth were assigned to a separate genus in the past. Hemipristis serra - An extinct species from the Oligocene-Miocene of Florida, South Carolina, and other areas on the Atlantic coast. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Chondrichthyes Order: Carcharhiniformes Family: Hemigaleidae Genus: Hemipristis Species: †serra
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