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Found 129 results

  1. Big manticoceras prepp

    Yet again a Manticoceras prepp my last few preppjobs were very succesful, and inspired by what @Ludwigia did on a larger one that I sent him, I tried to prepp one of my larger Manticoceras specimens. I tried a few new tricks to prepp this one, although the living chamber got dammaged, I decided to remove even more of the living chamber to show more of the inner shell with suture lines. It turned out quite well: Manticoceras sp. diameter 16 cm Frasnian ( late devonian ) Chimay area ( Belgium ) as found: ( top left specimen ) removed from the large chunk of matix: ( and glued back together, not everything went acording to plan ) during prepp: the end result:
  2. Manticoceras sp. (Hyatt 1884)

    From the album Cephalopods Worldwide

    Recieved on a trade with Manticocerasman.Thanks, Kevin! 11cm. Frasnian Late Devon Matagne Formation From the Lompret quarry in Belgium.
  3. In the small country of Belgium there is a city called Ostend, which lies near the North Sea and thus has a harbour. To boost economy and oversea trade they build great stone walls so bigger ships can easily make their turn to get into the port. This walls are made of limestone rocks. Since I go looking for shark teeth a lot on the beach I wondered if there were any fossils to find there. And yess, I was lucky I never expected to find fossils from probably Carbon era in the rock walls of our harbour 1) Caninia cornucopiae, a solitary coral 2) leptaeana sp. 3) bryozoa, fenestella sp. 4) brachiopod, spirifer sp. 5) trilobite piece 6) brachiopods (Thanks to my good friend Anthonie Hellemond for determination and dating the rocks probably from Carbon era. I just knew they were fossils, I only recognised the trilobite and the spirifer ) and the last two pictures are sharkteeth I found on the beach.
  4. Devonian of Belgium

    Hello all I found these two fossils in 2014 during a trip in Vierves-sur-Viroin. These are Devonian in age and were found together with trilobites, brachiopods... First one is some piece of coral I guess, no idea what kind. About 3 mm in diameter. Second is a mystery. I have no idea if these are fish vertebrates (which would be rare since it is Devonian) or crinoid parts (never seen any that look like these from the Devonian of Belgium, but I might be wrong) or something entirely else? I see at least 6 of them in the matrix. It's 3D and I don't dare to prep it any further untill I know if it's rare or common. Thanks already.
  5. Trilobites from Belgian carbonates

    hahncarboniflimestrilobitefaciesecolgeogrdistributbsbg_nr97_1988_077-093.pdf The Biostratigraphical distribution of Carboniferous Limestone Trilobites in Belgium and Adjacent Areas Bulletin de La Societe Belge de Geologie,T.97,fasc.1,1988 outtake(one of several pretty nice line drawings): size: about 2,9 MB
  6. For possible future sales/trades I’m wondering if there are people interested in miocene - pliocene fossils similar to these on the picture below. For trades I would mainly be interested in shark teeth material or micro matrix. Please reply or send me a Pm.
  7. Hey, fellow fossil forum members! Did any of the Belgian, Dutch, German & French members among us go to Paleotime this edition? I went for the second time this edition and I really loved it and I got some amazing loot Here are some snapshots I took! Did anyone else take more pictures or bought stuff at the fair? If so please share!
  8. Prepping nodules with Bactrites

    Although the most pieces of my collection are goniatites, I am more than happy to add other Devonian cephalopods to my collection from time to time. On my last field trip for devonian cephalopods I splitted a few nodules and some of them had a few uncommon fossils in them: Bactrites I rarely find decent fragments of them, but those few were looking promising. Bactrites, although they look like an orthocone are in fact straight Ammonoids and not a Nautiloid. the septas start to be slightly ondulated, but most important they have a ventral siphuncle, a typical trait of an Ammonoid. the first nodule had a fragment sticking out, and when I split the nodule another one was found inside. I kept both parts of the nodule and prepped the one inside and on top After prepping them I found out that neither of those were complete, but the were decent in size and well preserved. The second nodule on the other hand hand was much better, a piece of the Bactrites was sticking out from both ends of the nodule, so I new I had a complete specimen. The prepping was relatively hard as different parts of the cone had different forms of preservation, but in the end I got the whole specimen out of the matrix and is my best Bactrites until now. enjoythe pictures: 1st nodule with the specimen inside: after prepp: After prep with the top of the nodule containing an other fragment. prepp on the 2nd nodule: after prepp, with the different kinds of preservation visible: and the whole lot:
  9. Hello to everybody! I'm kinda new here, but before I start I must say I really love this forum! It has really great vibes and you instantly can tell that this is a good and friendly community! So, I am ziggycardon, I live in Belgium, close to the border of the Netherlands and when we start speaking geologically, I live on the same cretaceous sediments as where the first major Mosasaurus discoveries where done! Unfortunatly I have never been on a fossil hunt myself and everything currently in my collection was bought or given to me. But I hope to change that soon, as I am dying to go hunting myself. Maybe the Chalk sediments 3 km from my home would be a good place to start! For the rest, my job, my major hobby and my other main interest besides fossils are living animals. I currently work as the head of terrarium & aquarium in 3 different pet stores and I have quite a collection of reptiles, amphibians, invertebrates and tropic fish myself. In my spare time I often take my own living animals along with my fossils and other educational natural history material to schools so I can teach kids about nature and it's history and hidden mechanics. For the rest are my other hobbies mainly based around movies and televisions as I collect a lot of stuff drom my favorite franchises like "Lord or the Rings" & "The Hobbit", "Game of Thrones, "Pirates of the Caribbean", ... And I also attent a lot of comic cons and other events related to those franchises. But then this topic! In this topic I will show my collection of fossils (and also minerals, stones and meteorites) as it is right now and then I will highlight each group of fossils bit by bit. I am currently starting with a own specialized fossil room, so ofcourse the progress and end result will also be posted here! And ofcourse when something get's added to my collection, I'll show it here as well. Sometimes a photo of my "special" pets or taxidermy specimens might pop up, but this topic will mainly be about the fossil room and my fossil collection. For the rest, if you have any comments or questions about the collection or about me or about anything, feel free to ask! I'd love to reply!
  10. Today we went on a fieldtrip with the BVP ( https://paleontologie.be/ ) our local geology club to the quarry of Eben Emaal in Belgium, just across the border with Maastricht in the Netherlands. Here we can prospect Maastrichtian marine deposits. The fossils that were collected were; Belemnites, oysters, pecten, echinoids and a few shark teeth. there was evan a lucky one who found a mosasaur tooth. personally I did find 4 big echinoids ( hemipneustes striatoradiatus )and a few belemites, my girlfriend found 2 smaller echinoids ( catopygus ) and a few nice shark teeth.
  11. Galeocerdo aduncus

    From the album Pleistocene and Miocene fossils

    A 1.6 cm long Galeocerdo aduncus from the area of Antwerp (Hoevenen).
  12. Carcharadon hastalis.

    From the album Pleistocene and Miocene fossils

    A 2.5 cm long Carcharadon hastalis. tooth from Antwerp/Hoevenen.
  13. Somniosus microcephalus

    From the album Pleistocene and Miocene fossils

    A 1 cm long very rare upper tooth of Somniosus microcephalus from a sand pit near Antwerp.
  14. Last week I was on holiday in the Netherlands/Belgium and I found many things! I mainly hunted at the beaches near Cadzand but I was also in the area of Antwerp. There the quality of the shark teeth is much better and you can find more and rarer ones At the sand pit the Miocene, Pliocene sand was washed up from the extension of Churchill dock and as you can see the area is very overgrown. You can still find there many shark teeth, bones and bivalves. I mainly concentrated on finding shark teeth. The best method to find something there is to dig a bit and then sieve the material. Here is a picture of the site: The total haul: The better ones: This was one of the best finds: Its about 5 cm long and I think that its an Isurus Hastalis (please correct me if I am wrong ) I like the colors on this one: (3.5 cm) A sweet little Galeocerdo Aduncus tooth: (1.2 cm) And last but not least this was probably my rarest find there: Small but nice Its an upper tooth of Somniosus microcephalus. I already have a lower tooth but thats the first upper for me! I am very happy with it Thanks for watching and I hope you enjoyed my little hunting trip! Of course any ID help is welcome!
  15. Somniosus Belgium Shark Tooth?

    This Miocene tooth is 9.7mm and was from Antwerp, Belgium. It may be a Somniosus sp. tooth, what do you guys think?
  16. Found this beauty last weekend and wanted to share it with you guys ^^ posterior Alopias Grandis (Antwerp, Belgium)
  17. Hello, Here are some of my favorite finds from the Belgian devonian. Orthoceras and Manticoceras
  18. I already posted this hunting trip at the Zandmotor on my last vacation: http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/85026-a-beautiful-day-at-the-zandmotor/ I also visited some other locations like a sand pit near Antwerp (Belgium). This was my fourth visit there and probably the most successful until now The Miocene, Pliocene sand was washed up from the extension of Churchill dock and as you can see the area is very overgrown. You can still find there many shark teeth, bones and bivalves. I mainly concentrated on finding shark teeth. Here is picture of the location: This is a picture of my last visit there last year, because my pictures from this visit are all too blurred But the situation didnt change much. I think that the best method to find something there is to dig a bit and sieve the material. Too bad that I destroyed my sieve more or at the beginnig of the day: After that I had to search on the surface but nevertheless I managed to find some cool teeth This was the find of the day: Could this be a tooth of Isurus Hastalis? I am not sure.... Its about 4.6 cm long I was super happy that I could find such a beautiful and big tooth !! Here is my total haul: And here are some more of the better finds: A 4 cm long Isurus Oxynchus:
  19. And another Antwerp bivalve: Veneridae?

    Hi all, Slightly incomplete, but I think that this shell is from the Veneroidea order, and possibly the Veneridae. I would like to narrow that down a little more though, hopefully to species. Is Callista chione perhaps a possibility? It's from Antwerp, Belgium. "Scaldisian" of the Pliocene (3 myo), Kattendijk Formatie (?). Thanks in advance, Max
  20. Antwerp Pycnodonte?

    Hi all, Found this shell in the Antwerp harbor. From the "Scaldisian" of the Pliocene, about 3 myo. I think Kattendijk Formation (can anyone confirm this?). I think it's some kind of shell within the Pycnodonte genus maybe? If so, which one? I am pretty sure that it's from the Ostreidae. Thanks in advance, Max
  21. Fossil bivalves with periostracum???

    Hi all, Found these two shells in Antwerp, Belgium. It was in a place with lots of sand, and the sea was rather far away. There are tons of Pliocene shells there to be found. I also found these two bivalves. What I find really weird is that the periostracum (the brown layer) is still preserved!? How could that be? Nearly all fossil shells lose it when fossilizing, yet these two seem to have kept it. What do you think is the answer to this mystery? Fossils, with the periostracum preserved, or modern (but how did they get here?)? (Or maybe this isn't a periostracum at all. But what is it then?) I think that the species are Mytilus edulis and Spisula subtruncata (although that's by far the biggest Spisula I have ever seen) (both present modern in the North Sea, and occur as fossils in Belgium). I'm greatly anticipating your thoughts on this! Max
  22. Small Antwerp bivalve

    Hi all, Found this small bivalve in Antwerp, Belgium. Most likely from the Pliocene. That hinge is weird, with that thing sticking out (almost like the Mya shells!). Anyone know what species this is? Thanks in advance! Max
  23. Past weekend we had a "sunny" field trip to my usual hunting spot with the "LITHOS" geology club. We spent the whole day searching the late Devonian shales and nodules for al kind of fossils, brachiopods, crinoids, cephalopods, corals,... We did find the usual pyritised cephalopods ( manticoceras sp, tornoceras sp. and bactrites sp. ) but to me my biggest prize was when I hit a layer with a lot of goniatite anaptichy enjoy the pictures :
  24. Mid devonian trip in the Ardennes

    Yesterday we went on a fieldtrip organised by my geology club in the area of Marche en Famenne. In the morning the first stop was the visit of the "Grottes de Hotton" but me and my girlfiend didn't do this visit, so we got around 11am at the grottes to wait for the rest of the group. the weather was sunny and the temperatures very pleasant, this was going to be a very nice spring day. When the group was complete we hit the road to the quarry a couple of kilometers further. first we got a quick lesson about the geology of the quarry and safety mesures ( the sediments in the quarry were of mid Devonian age: Givetian). After this we where free to prospect the area. In the screes a lot of very large corals could be found, but I passed on those until I would find a more managable specimen. but a few of our friends did make the effort to drag a few of those back to the cars. After a while I found a verry good spot where a fossiliferous clay layer was washed out. this is where I found most of the good stuf. Lots and lots of Atrypas (brachiopods ) and a multitude of different corals ( sociophyllum, favosites, scoliopora,.. ) most of these were extremely wel preserved. With further prospection of the site we found a few other fossiliferous spots, one notable one where fragments of large Stringocephalus brachiopods could be found. we even found a few more or less complete specimens. At 4 pm we gathered back to the car and the finds where compared and discussed, and of course we left for a local pub to finish this perfect day for a refreshing drink. Enjoy the pictures: One of the big corals: The memmorial at the pub: the turret of an "easy 8 " sherman tank. Some time to rest after the hard work
  25. If you aren’t used to seeing marine coprolites, it is very easy to miss them as you search marine matrix. That is one of the reasons for this post. Also I posted these for @GeschWhat. Sometimes it can be very difficult to distinguish coprolites from small concretions or other geologic specimens. If in doubt pull them out and let a coprolite researcher make the determination. The below coprolites came from matrix (about 1 gallon) from the Egem Quarry in Belgium: The matrix contained a large number of shark and ray teeth. Sharks and rays produce spiral and scroll coprolites. I didn’t find any scroll coprolites. However, scroll coprolites tend to be fairly large and may be in the fauna but were too large for the matrix size that I was searching. I did find a few spiral coprolites. See the below 15 mm specimen: However the vast majority of coprolites looked to be from bony fish, with no evidence of spiraling and lots of fish bone inclusions. See the two pieces (15 mm and 5 mm) of coprolites below with very visible inclusions: Other examples (9 mm, 9 mm, and 15 mm) of bony fish coprolites (note the middle coprolite may have worn spiraling but I can't tell for sure) : Finding mostly bony fish coprolites was not surprising considering the number of bony fish teeth, jaws, vertebrae and especially otoliths also contained in the matrix. The below picture shows only the nicest otoliths (in total I found at least 3 times this number) from the matrix: Continued in the next reply Marco Sr.
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