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  1. Lone Hunter

    What's inside this oyster?

    This came from part of creek with Eagle Ford and QAL mix. I have no idea what I'm looking at other than it's not part of an oyster (some is). Thought it was ironstone but now not so sure. Has a couple of interesting little things and the obvious triangle shaped object which I'm really curious about. Thanks for looking and appreciate any input!
  2. Sjfriend

    Deep Spring Road bivalve ID?

    So still going thru items from my Deep Spring Road quarry dig 2 years ago. The ruler marks are mm. Below is a shell I "believe" is a bivalve. I think Goniophora sp. Any ideas please?
  3. I recently came across a cool-looking piece with three different shells close together in a matrix, but despite my attempt to Google some pointers while I was pondering if I wanted it or not, I'm simply not trained up enough to determine if fossils are real. There's some parts that some articles were talking about that make me think it could be real, and others that make me think not so much... I have a feeling the matrix maybe isn't the original, but I'm hoping perhaps the shells themselves are still fossilized? But I'm really not sure -- anyways, the pictures I took are below. I hope they gi
  4. Mainefossils

    Actinopteria bella

    Actinopteria bella is a species of bivalve found in the Leighton/Pembroke Fm, and first described by Henry S. Williams. It is differentiated from A. fornicata by less convexity in its shell and a wider beak. It is differentiated from A. dispar by its shorter shell. The above pictures are of the left valve. A poorly preserved original or cast of the shell exterior is on the left side. Some of the exterior of the shell may be missing since the exterior ribs have less than normal height. The right photo is an exterior impression or mold. Some of the shell may be present on
  5. Mainefossils

    Actinopteria bella

    This is another fossil from the Leighton Fm, Maine. It is an Actinopteria bella, a bivalve that was first described at this formation (here, https://repository.si.edu/bitstream/handle/10088/14399/1/USNMP-45_1985_1913.pdf). I have had multiple specimens of it, but this is the first one that came out in one piece. The pictures below are of the internal and external mold (top to bottom).
  6. Planko

    Pholodomya lincemani?

    Hey Every, I saw this last week while out at the NSR. There is a new exposed area about 20 feet up and saw this and an ammonite in the same exposure. It is right above the grey matrix. I got the ammonite but the slope was too wet last week. It was like ice skating trying to get to it. Got it today! Want to make sure my identification is correct and see how big these things got. I have the same species or similar next to it in a pic. Both found today. Same species maybe?
  7. Large bivalves found in Permian rock layers in southern Oklahoma is all my limited education knows. Lol can anyone elaborate on what these little guys are? Thanks for your help love learning and sharing here.
  8. I_gotta_rock

    Glycymeris Clam Internal Mold

    Glycymeris clams have ridges along the inside edge of the valves that extend past the cardinal area. Internal molds tend to include these teeth, making them very distinctive. As of the time this was posted, this was the only member of the genus listed in the Paleobio Database for the Cretaceous period and it is only listed as being found in NJ. However, Stuart Weller (1907) and Horace G Richards (1958) not only include them in the C and D Canal zone, but identify three different species for the region. This one is the most common and the only one THEY found outside of NJ.
  9. Thecosmilia Trichitoma

    Bay Point Formation Bivalve #2

    I found this small bivalve in the Bay Point Formation exposed in Point Loma in San Diego, CA. These were very plentiful, and I also found many extremely tiny ones when searching through micro matrix from the site. The Scale is in Centimeters. The underside of the specimen
  10. Thecosmilia Trichitoma

    Bay Point Formation Bivalve ID

    I found this bivalve eroding out of the Pleistocene Bay Point Formation of Point Loma near Sunset Cliffs in San Diego CA. Does anyone know the ID or have a good resource for Bay Point Formation Mollusks that isn’t paywalled. This isn’t important for the ID, but the matrix filling in the shell is full of original aragonite shell material! It’s common at the site, but still really amazing!
  11. Tetradium

    100_8978

    From the album: Bivalves of Platteville/Decorah Formation Minnesota

    Ctenodonta longa - rare Decorah Twin Cities. Tiny actually.
  12. Tetradium

    100_8977

    From the album: Bivalves of Platteville/Decorah Formation Minnesota

    Ctenodonta species. Localized common in very fine light shell hash. Hard to make out other details.
  13. Tetradium

    100_8979

    From the album: Bivalves of Platteville/Decorah Formation Minnesota

    Ctenodonta hamburgensis Decorah Formation. Rare. This one is unusual in most of shell is perserved, only a chuck missed from right side.
  14. Tetradium

    100_8980

    From the album: Bivalves of Platteville/Decorah Formation Minnesota

    Vanuxemia sardesoni Platteville only that I know of. Much more flatter and wider than other Vanuxemia species. Uncommon.
  15. Karam

    Fossils in Lebanon

    Greetings! I've been collecting marine fossils ever since I could remember. However, only recently have I started reading and researching about these fossils. I started researching for the correct rocks to break open in hope of finding new fossils (ammonites, fish fossils, etc..) instead of my usual findings (gastropods, clams, rarely urchins). I took some advice from you guys and began looking for a good book that might help on which rocks to look for (keepings in mind Lebanon is mostly early-middle cretaceous and Jurassic) I've used this map to find my way to Jurassic
  16. TheShrifter

    Some Brachiopod/Bivalves and Coral

    Hello, I have personally collected these far from perfect samples on some hiking trips and from around the field I work in. I have included a Die in each picture that is 2cm³, and have the corresponding number on the die to each specimen/picture. Any help with ID would be cool! Thanks in advance! 1. Stromatolites? Devonian - Palliser FM. 2. Bryozoan? Devonian - Palliser FM 3. ?Buchia? Cretaceous - FM unknown could be Three possibilities and I am not familiar enough with how the formations lay for the
  17. ClearLake

    Wyoming Cretaceous Bivalve

    A while back I collected a group of bivalves from the Frontier Formation (Cretaceous) just south of Kemmerer (Lincoln County) Wyoming and I am having some trouble pinning down an ID. The formation is known for containing Crassostrea soleniscus and Inoceramus, but these are neither of those. Based on my Texas Cretaceous Bivalves book, they could be some species of Panopea but I am not at all certain of that. Unfortunately, although I have quite a number of samples, there aren't any that expose the dentition so that is a bit of a disadvantage. I'm hoping one of our Wyoming experts and/or b
  18. Gregory Kruse

    Florida Bivalve Identification Help

    Hello, I found this bivalve along the Sanibel Causeway in Ft. Myers, FL. They were in a pile of shells being used for landscaping so I presume that the sediments came from a nearby quarry of ?Pleistocene age, possibly the Caloosahatchee Fm. Can someone help me verify and identify this fossil? Thank you! Greg Kruse, Casper, WY
  19. Hello, I found these bivalves in north Cape Coral, FL. They were in a pile of shells being used for landscaping so I presume that the sediments came from a nearby quarry of ?Pleistocene age, possibly the Caloosahatchee Fm. Can someone help me verify and identify these fossils? Thank you!
  20. Hello, I found this bivalve in north Cape Coral, FL. They were in a pile of shells being used for landscaping so I presume that the sediments came from a nearby quarry of ?Pleistocene age, possibly the Caloosahatchee Fm. Can someone help me verify and identify this fossil? Thank you!
  21. Nimravis

    Indiana Ordovician Bivalve ID

    Over the weekend I found this bivalve while collecting at the St. Leon, Indiana roadcut. I posted it in the Hunting Trip section, but received no ID on this piece, so I figured that I would put it here to see if some Member could give me an ID. I have never found one like this before nor can I find a similar one while checking various web pages. Thanks
  22. Gregory Kruse

    Florida Bivalve Identification Help

    Hello, I found this bivalve along the Sanibel Causeway in Ft. Myers, FL. They were in a pile of shells being used for landscaping so I presume that the sediments came from a nearby quarry of ?Pleistocene age. Can someone help me verify and identify these two fossils? Thank you!
  23. Thecosmilia Trichitoma

    Show us your Inoceramus!

    Inoceramus are one of the most widespread and commonly found Mesozoic marine bivalves, ranging from the Early Jurassic to the Late Cretaceous. They are found in deposits all over the world, and can be small, or huge. So show us your Inos! Here are two I have found. The first is a plate with two of them from Holzmaden, where they are extremely common. The second is a larger weathered one from a local State Park tide pool. ( Of course, I didn’t collect it.)
  24. Thomas.Dodson

    Georgia Dredge Mollusk ID Help

    These are some unidentified mollusk fossils I collected among the dredge spoils along the Savannah River in Savannah, Georgia a couple years back. Because of the mixed nature of the dredge sediments exact aging isn't possible but they represent Miocene, Pliocene, and Pleistocene sediments. Most of the stuff from this site has been identified and @MikeR's resources have been a great help for some other ones but I'd like some help on these. # 1, 2, and 3. Some Muricid? I'm not really sure where to start to try and narrow it down. #4 #5 Crepidu
  25. OregonFossil

    What would you do?

    So I have found a significant "load" of mostly bivalves in a very deep water mudstone. This mudstone is very hard, when it fractures it is a lot like obsidian, extremely sharp and extremely hard. The specimen in this image is 3 x 5mm. The calcium shell has very little identifiable structures, yet the cast part seems "fair" crisp. If the shell was removed perhaps shell parts would be shown in the cast for ID. Would you remove the shell (if so how? acidic acid?). Any ideas on how to soften this mudstone, it is as hard but not as brittle as any shale I have seen. G picks don't see to do anything
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