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  1. Over the weekend I tried some new Fox Hills and Cannonball Formation sites as well as returning to a couple old ones. Most of the new Fox Hills site was covered in abundant Ophiomorpha, a decapodian trace fossil very typical for parts of the Fox Hills. Abundant free weathered pieces of the burrows. There was a rather large Crassostrea subtrigonalis oyster bed on the property. A common fossil in the upper Fox Hills but I don't often see them in the abundance of this site (fragments in the thousands). All white/sharp edge
  2. On July 1st, 2021, I went for the first time to a public, personal site and was very pleased with the results of my fossil excursion. The locale consists of several exposed formations, namely the Liberty formation I was hunting in. In my region of southwestern Ohio, that's known to be one of the best fossil-hunting formations due to its remarkable preservation of particularly fragile Ordovician life, even when compared to the excellent fossil preservation quality of other formations in the area. The thirty-three degrees Celsius heat was rather hot by itself, and as the sun's rays
  3. Hi, I am in search of Plate 8 from the following paper. Yes, the paper is published online at Biodiversity Heritage Library, but both Plate 8 and its accompanying "Explanation" (i.e., captions) page are unfortunately missing from the online edition. Please post a scan if you have easy access to Plate 8 from this paper, thanks. Driscoll, E. G. 1965. Dimyarian Pelecypods of the Mississippian Marshall Sandstone of Michigan. Palaeontographica Americana, No. 35.
  4. I recently came across a cool-looking piece with three different shells close together in a matrix, but despite my attempt to Google some pointers while I was pondering if I wanted it or not, I'm simply not trained up enough to determine if fossils are real. There's some parts that some articles were talking about that make me think it could be real, and others that make me think not so much... I have a feeling the matrix maybe isn't the original, but I'm hoping perhaps the shells themselves are still fossilized? But I'm really not sure -- anyways, the pictures I took are below. I hope they gi
  5. Despite the shortest and most mild winter I've experienced in North Dakota (getting out this early is rare) it still feels like it has been an eternity since I got out. Thankfully I finally got a hold of enough landowners to warrant a trip to the Fox Hills Formation and celebrate the spring weather. While most of the later sites I visited were a bust the first site of the morning was excellent and contained fauna not often found in the Fox Hills Formation in North Dakota. 3 new species for me in fact. This site represents a brackish transition area of the top of the Fox Hills Forma
  6. Thomas.Dodson

    Pennsylvanian Bivalve (Bond Formation)

    This bivalve came from an outcrop of the Bond Formation in Edgar County Illinois. Edit: After further research it seems to resemble something in the family Sanguinolitidae but without better references that is likely as far as I will get with it. Hopefully someone will have another idea or more experience with this strata and area.
  7. Mr.Baker

    Fossil

    Does anyone know if it’s possible for the meat; the edible part, of an oyster to be fossilised?
  8. These were collected on the TFF DSR trip last spring. I'm just now getting around to processing the fossils. I'll start with the bivalvia, because they were the primary reason I wanted to go to DSR (and to meet fellow forum members, of course!). My phone editor doesn't have italics, so the names on the photos are not italicized. Scale is in mm. If you see a specimen that is misidentified, please let me know. I have also included some for which I don't yet have a confident ID. Please chime in if you know them.
  9. Peat Burns

    Briggs TFF Report

    This is a belated report from the Briggs TFF gathering last spring. Here are some photos of TFF'ers working the site: Here are my finds (not in phylogenetic order). Scale in mm throughout. I guess I'll start with one of my bucket listers, a large goniatite: Next, the trilobotes: And "those other arthropods": Now the gastropods: Other Mollusca: Crinoidea: Seedles
  10. doushantuo

    the young ones

    Pimpaounionidlarvontogenicedulcaquital2012.pdf Amer. Malac. Bull. 30(1): 73–84 (2012) 73 Comparative morphometry and morphology of glochidial shells of Amazonian Hyriidae (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Unionida) Daniel Mansur Pimpão, Maria Cristina Dreher Mansur, Paulo Eduardo Aydos Bergonci, and Colin Robert Beasley
  11. D.N.FossilmanLithuania

    Two jurassic bivalves from Western Lithuania

    Good morning everyone! I have some bivalves found in dark marl erratic boulders of Klaipeda district (western Lithuania) and I hardly can find information about two specimens I show here in the photos. The first looks like pholadomyoid (oblong and with radial ridges) and the other looks like arcid or cardiid (it has rays in the lower edge of shell). Please help to identify genera of these two bivalves if you could. Best Regards Domas
  12. ozgur70

    Mesozoic bivalvia

    Turkey, Karaman Late mesozoic.
  13. ozgur70

    Miosen bivalvia

    A small one. 15 mm. The bivalvia fauna of Miosen in Karaman basin is really amazing. Turkey, Karaman.
  14. ozgur70

    miosen bivalvia3

    Turkey, Karaman, 8 mm
  15. ozgur70

    Miosen bivalvia2

    Turkey, Karaman. An other beautiful one. it is only 9 mm..
  16. ozgur70

    Mesozoic bivalvia

    Turkey, Karaman Late Mesozoic
  17. ozgur70

    Mesozoic bivalvia

    Turkey/Karaman Late Mesezoic
  18. doushantuo

    taphonomy & methodology

    Disentangling the history of complex multi-phased shell beds based on the analysis of 3D point cloud data Mathias Harzhauser, Ana Djuricic,Oleg Mandic,Martin Zuschin,Peter Dorninger,Clemens Nothegger,Balázs Székelyb,Eetu Puttonen,Gábor Molnárb,Norbert Pfeifer Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology Volume 437, 1 November 2015, Pages 165-180 1-s2.0-S0031018215004149-main.pdf taxa concerned: Paroxystele amedei (Brongniart, 1823) r Superfamily: Neritoidea Rafinesque, 1815 Agapilia pachii c Nerita plutonis (Basterot, 1825) f Superfamily: Cerithoidea
  19. ricardo

    Bivalvia collection

    Some Bivalvia from my study collection. Regards, ricardo
  20. Gen. et sp. indet.

    elongated & frilly

    Can you ID this bivalve? Lower Campanian, marine, southern Poland. As always - sorry for the unpreped specimen (it's delicate) and the poor quality of photos (best I can do for now).
  21. Chelydra

    fossil quahog

    This amazing bivalve fossil was a gift. The giver had no info to offer. I am curious about what its origins might be - where/when; about how old it might have been when it died (it is 6 inches across and has several hundred growth ridges); and I would like to understand how fossilization can result in what appears to be a set of perfectly intact valves, complete with so much detail - in other words, the shells are much heavier than living shells would be, what has replaced the calcium bicarbonate to make the shells so much heavier?
  22. Dear TFF, Any ideas about more accurate bivalve ID? Thank you, Ricardo
  23. doushantuo

    Montana, a shortish faunal review

    EASTON W.H.Easton: Carboniferous Faunas and Formation of Central Montana A study of the stratigraphic and ecologic associations and significance of fossils from the Big Snowy group of Mississippian and Pennsylvanian rocks Geological suvey Proferssional paper n.348/1962 Number of pages 157 PLATE two: stratidistribplate-2.pdf PLATE ONE(correlation/logs) plate-1.pdf to be used with some care with regard to (at least)the taxonomic aspects
  24. Dear TFF members, Could be Parastarte triquetra (Conrad, 1846) ? Merrit island Pleistocene Thanks, Ricardo
  25. First trip of the year today to the "Fossil Gardens" at Paulding, Ohio. This is quarry spoil of mid-Devonian age, Silica Formation. There was not a cloud in the sky, and temps were relatively warm at 43 deg. F. I was the only one there for most of the day, and it was extremely peaceful. What a great day. Here are pics of some of the finds. These are "farm fresh" and haven't even been washed yet, but I did take time to polish some horn corals and get some acetate peels (couldn't wait). A large Cystiphylloides rugose coral.
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