Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'blastoid'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • blogs_blog_99
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • retired blog
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Books I have enjoyed
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • Between A Rock And A Hard Place
  • Rudist digging at "Point 25", St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria (Campanian, Gosau-group)
  • Prognathodon saturator 101
  • Ever put a foot in your mouth

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

  1. Lise found the first blastoid of the year at Arkona, during last weeks spectacular warm spell. She also found the first Petoskey stone, though there was very little of Lake Huron’s shoreline free of snow and ice. I, however, found a stromatoporoid. An interesting piece, from a chunk of armour stone, quarried from somewhere or other. A spectacular ice nugget was also found.
  2. Work and weather have kept me from doing much fossil collecting these last couple of months. But I was finally able to photograph finds from my last outing. I found some interesting stuff I think. We'll start with my favorite find.. This is the large blastoid Xyeleblastus magnificus. They're always found crushed to some extent (even the holotype.) This is only the second blastoid I've found in the Fort Payne! Did well with the crinoids that day A very nice Agaricocrinus sp. with the stem attachment point exposed (they
  3. Jackson g

    Halloween hunt

    Goodmorning/ afternoon all! Being a middle aged 20 year old, I've outgrown the need to go trick or treating for candy on Halloween. This year, my brother and I were supposed to have my nephew over for the weekend. We had originally planned some fun activities for the little guy (he's 4) as real trick or treating was out of the question this year. Turns out this week that 4 of his day care workers came down with the Covid, so he's now in quarantine at his mom's house for 3 (her choice, she won't budge) weeks. All alone for Saturday now, I decided to go out and look for the real treats, f
  4. DPS Ammonite

    Orophocrinus saltensis

    This silicified blastoid at 31 mm in width is close to maximum size for the species. Found with at least three species of crinoids in Mississippian Escabrosa Limestone which is roughly equivalent to the Redwall Limestone of central and northern Arizona. Macurda D. B., Jr. 1965. The functional morphology and stratigraphic distribution of the Mississippian blastoid genus Orophocrinus. Journal of Paleontology 39(6):1045-1096. McKee, Edwin D., Gutschick, R. C., 1969. History of the Redwall Limestone of northern Arizona. Geological Society of America Memoirs 114, 1-700.
  5. Fellow WIPS member Shellie Luallin, who is expert in 3D imaging of fossils https://sketchfab.com/Paleogirl recently imaged a presumed Pennsylvanian blastoid of mine from Cherokee County, OK and generously made it available as a free download: https://sketchfab.com/3d-models/pentremites-rusticus-e729f54539014770b0128b000fca841b Note the very pronounced interambulacral areas (deltoids) where the hydrospires are developed. Katz (1978) https://www.jstor.org/stable/1303971?seq=1 lumped exisiting variant
  6. FossilNerd

    The Day of The Echinoderm

    Firstly, a big THANK YOU to @Jeffrey P for hanging out with me for the day! What a knowledgeable, generous, and all around swell guy! If you ever get the opportunity to hunt with Jeff, I highly encourage you to. Jeff and I met at around 8:30 am, and after a quick transfer of his gear to my truck, we were off. We first drove about 45 minutes south to the small town of Wax, to hunt the Upper Mississippian. Specifically to look for blastoids and crinoid calyxes that were known to be found in the area. As it happens, luck was with us! Unfortunately, I didn't take the fiel
  7. Hello there! As it's getting nicer outside and things slowly turning back to normal, many of us are able to go out and enjoy the weather again. I journeyed to one of my favorite Burlington exposures just 10 minutes from my home. As it was so nice outside, I ran into a lot of friendly fishermen. Not unlike usual, its just me there for the fossils! My favorite spot I'm heading to has me walking a few miles before I start to hit the sweet spots. Along the few mile walk there, it looks like the beavers have been busy. You can tell as you approach the Burlington limestone alone by
  8. Bonehunter

    blastoid, echinoderm?

    Found this in a gravel bar when I was a kid in south St. Louis county. One of my favorites simply due to the complexity, the impression, and the "remnant piece". Not sure how to differentiate pentremite from blastoid other than the narrow suture lines/rays? Thoughts welcomed! Bone
  9. I have two of these in my 12-yr old "kids museum" (many of which I know need to relabel ). I still have the original typed (yes on a typewriter ) card explaining what I have. I still have yellowed cut 3x5" notecards I used, and a typewriter, so I can update my museum!! There are two-one of which is still attached to the original styrofoam tray! The museum is 47 years old but you will not find it on any historical landmarks Am I along the correct line for what these are?- thanks! Bone
  10. T. nepaeolicus

    What is a blastoid?

    Can someone explain to me what a blastoid is? Britannica was absolutely useless and so I turned to here for a better explanation. Are they related to crinoids in any way?
  11. I was wondering if there are ways to make out the difference between an isolatad crinoid and blastoid calix, what are the indicators?
  12. DPS Ammonite

    Amazing Arizona Adventure II

    I went back to my very productive Devonian Martin Formation and Mississippian Escabrosa Formation near Superior, Arizona to retrieve my large single crinoid head fossil. Amazing Arizona Adventure original post link After some acid prep four crinoids and one blastoid were clustered together. Currents probably sorted them by size and shape. Several more hours of acid prep made the remaining four best ones stand out. I had to carefully break away pieces of shell that adhered and covered the crinoids and blastoid. Careful monitoring of their progre
  13. DPS Ammonite

    Amazing Arizona Adventure

    I found one of my most interesting and productive fossil sites ever east of Phoenix near Superior, Arizona in late November. The hill contained outcrops of the Devonian Martin Formation and the Mississippian Escabrosa Formation which is roughly the same age as the Redwall Limestone found further north. My first interesting find was several Pachyphyllum corals with very small corallites. The “craters” within the corallites averages just under 2 mm which suggested that these were the P. nevadense species which is not common in the Payson area further to the north. The c
  14. Hi again! Two more ID requests - this time they're from the Bangor Limestone in Alabama, USA (Lower Carboniferous, Mississippian). Specimen #1: An orthoconic nautiloid - could it be Brachycycloceras sp.? Specimen #2: A blastoid - Pentremites sp.? Thanks for your help! Monica
  15. aps13034

    Is this a blastoid?

    I found this on partridge point in Alpena MI in Devonian limestone and have been finding crinoids and blastoids. I’m not sure what this is.
  16. matt2396

    A most unusual blastoid

    Hey everyone, long time no see! Last week, my historical geology class went on a field trip and did a little fossil collecting, so naturally I've had the fever ever since. A couple of days later I decided to hit a nearby roadcut and do some nosing around. After a few hours I had collected some very nice echinoderm material (including a nice Taxocrinus crown), some of which I am not totally familiar with. What I thought to be my most unusual find was this weirdo little blastoid. The first thing that struck me is the rust color, I've only seen this in my Floraville blastoids, and those are just
  17. badfish182

    Plant fossil

    I have searched since I found this, to figure out exactly what it is. Nobody that I have talked to has been able to for sure ID it. I found it while searching for crinoid fossils at a beach near Michigan City, Indiana, in Lake Michigan. I was swimming around, picking up anything I found, taking a look, and I tossed this one up on the beach. We were guessing that it may be the bulb part of a crinoid, but I haven't found anything online that looks exactly like this one. We used dental tools to pick out some of the sandy stuff, so we could see more detail. My hand is not in the picture for
  18. Paciphacops

    Silurian blastoid

    I just relocated an unusual fossil that had been lost in some shoebox deposits. It appears to be a slightly crushed blastoid, but otherwise well preserved. It is pink colored and may be replaced with dolomite. I found it several years ago in Sumner County, TN at a place called South Tunnel. The site is a railroad cut exposing the Laurel Limestone and a few feet of Waldron Shale at the top, both middle Silurian in age. The rock had fallen out of the cut, but the extremely hard limestone looks like typical Laurel, a dolomitic limestone with very few fossils other than a few crinoid stem segments
  19. These are a few of the pdf files (and a few Microsoft Word documents) that I've accumulated in my web browsing. MOST of these are hyperlinked to their source. If you want one that is not hyperlinked or if the link isn't working, e-mail me at joegallo1954@gmail.com and I'll be happy to send it to you. Please note that this list will be updated continuously as I find more available resources. All of these files are freely available on the Internet so there should be no copyright issues. Articles with author names in RED are new additions since July 10
  20. I went shopping for a nice Cystoid (We don't have in my area as far as I know) - Bought a Holocystites scutellatus - When researching the taxonomy, Wikipemedia Commons gives the following: Regnum: Animalia • Phylum: Echinodermata • Subphylum: Blastozoa • Classis: Cystoidea • Ordo: Aristocystitida • Familia: Aristocystitidae • Genus: Holocystites Hall, 1864 Fossilworks gives: Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Echinodermata Subphylum: †Blastozoa - Sprinkle 1973 Class: †Diploporita Superfamily: †Sphaeronitida Family: †Holocystitidae Genus: †Holocystites So - Is it a CY
  21. Northern Sharks

    Pentremites.jpg

    From the album: Northern's inverts

  22. Northern Sharks

    Devonoblastus whiteavesi.jpg

    From the album: Northern's inverts

  23. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Blastoids - Two Pentremites in Matrix Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 years old) Blastoids (class Blastoidea) are an extinct type of stemmed echinoderm.[1] Often called sea buds, blastoid fossils look like small hickory nuts. They first appear, along with many other echinoderm classes, in the Ordovician period, and reached their greatest diversity in the Mississippian subperiod of the Carboniferous period. However, blastoids may have originated in the Cambrian. Blastoids persisted until their extinction at the
  24. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Blastoids - Two Pentremites in Matrix Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 years old) Blastoids (class Blastoidea) are an extinct type of stemmed echinoderm.[1] Often called sea buds, blastoid fossils look like small hickory nuts. They first appear, along with many other echinoderm classes, in the Ordovician period, and reached their greatest diversity in the Mississippian subperiod of the Carboniferous period. However, blastoids may have originated in the Cambrian. Blastoids persisted until their extinction at the
  25. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Pentremites Blastoid echinoderm fossil Kentucky, USA Early to Middle Carboniferous, from 360.7 to 314.6 years ago Blastoids (class Blastoidea) are an extinct type of stemmed echinoderm. Often called sea buds, blastoid fossils look like small hickory nuts. They first appear, along with many other echinoderm classes, in the Ordovician period, and reached their greatest diversity in the Mississippian subperiod of the Carboniferous period. However, blastoids may have originated in the Cambrian. Blastoids persisted until their extinction at the end of Permian, about 250 million year
×
×
  • Create New...