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Found 12 results

  1. cngodles

    Kasimovian Goniatitid

    I've had this for quite some time, I thought it may have been a gastropod. But I'm now very convinced I have an ammonoid. They are very rare over my way, they didn't like coming into the geologically temporary shallow sea bays that formed. We have many Nautiloids, but not many Goniatitids. I've considered Pennoceras and Mangeroceras. The former is reported from rocks of similar age in Ohio, but the shell ornament has me considering the latter. The growth lines curve back towards the posterior at the dorsal-lateral shoulders. Anyone from the mid-continent (who are swimming in ammono
  2. I'm chipping away at what I think is brush creek limestone to find what I think is Mooreoceras (first two pics) and Metacoceras. I have no idea what the last fossil is. All help is appreciated, thank you.
  3. Lucid_Bot

    I Don't See This In My Field Guide

    I just have so many questions, thanks for your patience. Found these two pieces in what, I think, is Brush Creek Limestone; they're definitely Pennsylvanian Period and from Allegheny County, PA. The first one is 3 cm x 1 cm, the second is about 2.5 cm long.
  4. cngodles

    Late Pennsylvanian Fish Tooth

    Whatever this fish tooth is, I've never found one before. I had a small sliver showing in a rock and spent over an hour slowly air scribing over it and getting it to this point. I'm hesitant to go much further, as I may break it. I considered Polyacrodus for the shape, but I see none with the pitted pattern that this has. Tired of trying to ID Pennsylvanian fish teeth yet, @connorp? Maybe this is another paver type teeth from a ray, etc. For scale, the length of the tooth in the first photo is 13 mm.
  5. Lucid_Bot

    Five Holes in an Arch

    Found this the other day in what I think is brush creek limestone. The area is Glenshaw Formation, Carboniferous (Pennsylvanian). All help is appreciated.
  6. Lucid_Bot

    Pennsylvanian Marine Fossil?

    Howdy! Chiseled this out of a rock today. I thought it was a coral at first, but not quite sure now. The final picture is a cross section of the inside. Thanks in advance.
  7. cngodles

    Pentagon shaped piece

    When cleaning up rocks I brought home today, I found this little piece that I didn't originally target. It's pentagon shape makes me believe it's for sure a fossil. I've never found anything like it, so I feel like I'm about to get an education here. Perhaps part of a crinoid? Whatever it is, I don't have the experience, yet. Also noticed the indented hole on the top. Maybe part of it, maybe not. It's way too centered I think to not be part of it. Underside. It is convex with a small raised ridge along the edge. Sideways view of the
  8. cngodles

    A plant in limestone?

    This one has been sitting in my "interesting but I have no clue" pile for a while. When I found it, I was splitting limestone laying in the stream. I've found that when you split limestone, immediately after splitting you'll get a couple moments of a sharp looking specimen before things start to oxidize. The limestone is a very dark gray, or almost black color. You either see black limestone or white calcite pieces while splitting. I split this particular piece open and right in the middle was a 3-4 cm long, 8 mm wide gold looking rectangle in the middle of the flat broken limeston
  9. Hello all. Quite a time back I found this shiny black thing in a piece of Brush Creek limestone. I had tentatively identified it as a trilobite free cheek part. However, a trip to the museum has the invertebrate paleontology department telling me that it's not for two reasons. While similar looking as a free cheek, the top portion doesn't match It's way too big to be a trilobite from this time period. I do agree with both assessments. It's twice the size of a typical Kasimovian (Late Pennsylvanian) trilobite from here. So, any fish part
  10. Found this small oddity while breaking apart limestone. The pitted appearance was interesting. The pits also seem to extend the whole way through. They also appear to wrap at a 90 degree angle on the side that isn't broken. The broken side reveals how they go through. I chipped away a little at the matrix, but didn't go too tough to keep from breaking it. Whole specimen with scale: (stacked photo) Showing outside 90 degree wrapped edge with same appearance: (stacked photo) Broken edge showing channels going through the width. Ad
  11. cngodles

    Domatoceras Perhaps?

    So most of what I find is Metacoceras or Pseudorthoceras, two very common cephalopods locally. I've found a few Solenochilus, but they are different enough that I know what I found right away. This specimen was discovered as a body chamber. I thought Metacoceras, because, why not? Anything of this shape usually is. After some moderate prep, I revealed some more body chamber, but not any suture marks. The venter is oddly shaped as well, with a shallow U shape. It might be crushed, so I didn't pay it too much mind. I also discovered that the body chamber is much larger than any Metac
  12. cngodles

    Pennsylvanian Ammonoid

    I've had this specimen sitting in my "I'll get to it later" pile since last year. I've learned a lot about Cephalopods the past year, one of them being the differences between Nautiloids and Ammonoids. Upon re-inspection of this yesterday, I noticed the shell lines, but more importantly the suture lines caught my eye. These do exist here, but I would call them pretty rare to find. Not being an expert, I would consider Wellerites or Schistoceras, but these are based on quick comparisons using a Pennsylvanian Cephalopods of Ohio book I have. I started to clean up the rock using an ai
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