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  1. “Absolutely Mind-Boggling” Massive New Animal Species Discovered in 500 Million-Year-Old Burgess Shale. SciTechDaily, September 8, 2021 ‘Spaceship-Shaped’ Fossil Reveals Hungry Predator of Ancient Oceans Titanokorys gainesi, turned up in the Canadian Rockies, was among the largest known predators 500 million years ago. Trilobites, New York Times A Football-Shaped Animal Species Is Discovered In A 500-Million-Year- Old Shale, NPR, September 9, 2021 The open access paper is: Caron, J.-B., and Moysiuk, J., 2021. A giant nektobenthic ra
  2. BentonlWalters

    Walcott Quarry Vauxia gracilenta

    Six years ago I got the chance to visit the Walcott Quarry (see my longer post on this adventure in fossil trips) and while there I found this specimen of Vauxia gracilenta. Ever since I've wanted to make it part of my collection somehow, so this year for my birthday I decided to have a life reconstruction commissioned. Having seen the other fantastically detailed Cambrian models produced by @thorst, I asked him if he would be willing to reconstruct and 3D print the sponge. I drew an interpretation of the fossil and in no time he had it completed. A huge thank you for
  3. Meet Cambroraster falcatus, the sediment-sifting ‘Roomba’ of the Cambrian This crustacean-like critter stalked the seas half a billion years ago. Katherine Wu, NOVA,, July 30, 2019 Moysiuk, J. and Caron, J.B., 2019. A new hurdiid from the Burgess Shale evinces the exploitation of Cambrian infaunal food sources. Proceedings of the Royal Society B, 286 (1908), p.20191079. Open access Proceedings of the Royal Society B PDF Brantford Lapidary and Mineral Society PDF Sun, Z., Zeng, H. and Zhao, F., Occurrence of the hurdiid radio
  4. BentonlWalters

    The Burgess Shale

    I’ve decided to take a break from dissertation writing and write up something else instead, one of the greatest fossil hunts I’ve been on, my trip to the Burgess Shale. Its been a little while since I got to go but here is the story as I remember it. I’ll write this up in a few parts since I took a lot of pictures and I’m going through and editing them as I go. Part 1: Going on an Adventure A little bit of background to start off. When I was younger (around 12 I think) I got the opportunity to go to the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History in Washington DC.
  5. Hi everyone Last Thursday I went to visit the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences in Brussels as a little pre-birthday trip. I have visited this museum several times in the past few years, but this time I took my camera with me and thought it might be fun to do a photo tour of the museum for this forum Beware, this will be quite a big topic that might take a few days to complete as I took nearly 750 photo's in the museum (a lot will have to be sorted out though due to blurry quality, photo's of only name tags and doubles) as I wanted to show pretty much all fossil displays
  6. YXWYX

    Olenoides serratus

    Seems like it also preserves a little bit of antenae as well.
  7. I think this is a bait and switch article. It starts off by telling you about the Burgess shale then transitions into explaining why we are going extinct too. I didn't learn anything new from reading it though. Anyway there are pictures. Of trilobites. https://www.washingtonpost.com/outlook/2019/12/06/ghosts-future/?arc404=true
  8. Guest11596

    Nature of Things / Nova

    Nature of Things - First Animals "Earth's very first animals, 500-million-years-old, are just being uncovered." Stream: https://gem.cbc.ca/media/the-nature-of-things/season-59/episode-5/38e815a-011d21a2a31?cmp=GEM_SEM2_FirstAnimals Article: https://www.cbc.ca/natureofthings/episodes/first-animals Nova - Rise of the Mammals "Sixty-six million years ago, an asteroid wiped out the dinosaurs in a fiery global catastrophe. But we know little about how their successors, the mammals, recovered and took over the world. Now, hidden inside ordinary-lo
  9. Found near the original Burgess shale, this relative of anamalocaris probably fed in bottom sediments https://m.phys.org/news/2019-07-voracious-cambrian-predator-cambroraster-species.html
  10. doushantuo

    cambrian taphonomy

    Trace fossils associated with Burgess Shale nonbiomineralized carapaces:bringing taphonomic and ecological controls into focus M. Gabriela Mangano, Christopher David Hawkes,and Jean-Bernard Caron R. Soc. open sci. 6: 172074. http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rsos.172074 Category: teeth-gnashingly relevant for those into the Cambrian and interested in Lower Paleozoic taphonomy and ichnology
  11. https://vancouversun.com/pmn/news-pmn/canada-news-pmn/burgess-shale-fossils-add-branches-to-tree-of-life-says-royal-society-report/wcm/478ac084-90cc-4d05-950b-803b635a3bfb https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/10.1098/rspb.2018.2314
  12. Thecosmilia Trichitoma

    Burgess Shale New Species!!!!

    https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2018/11/some-earth-s-first-animals-including-mysterious-alien-looking-creature-are-spilling-out
  13. I love fossils from the Burgess Shale and came across this just released paper on Waptia fieldensis, very informative publication http://rsos.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/5/6/172206
  14. A new interesting find from the British Columbia http://vancouversun.com/pmn/news-pmn/canada-news-pmn/new-508-year-old-bristle-worm-found-at-burgess-shale-fossil-site-in-b-c/wcm/8c7c82f4-dd88-4bb4-ba99-e8cd44e9f176
  15. New discoveries in the Cambrian world especially from the Burgess Shale never cease to amaze me. The latest is described in this paper. Blog: https://phys.org/news/2017-12-million-year-old-sea-predator-jackknife.amp?__twitter_impression=true Paper: https://bmcevolbiol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12862-017-1088-7
  16. Not sure if anyone has posted a link to this already... a bit old, too (last Aug.) but new to me: https://phys.org/news/2017-08-scientists-id-tiny-prehistoric-sea.html#nRlv
  17. Pottery

    Fossils from Norway, Fossil ID.

    Hello guys and girls, I'm new here :-) Could you help me identify these fossils. They are all from my local city of Porsgrunn, Norway. I gathered these over the cause of a few days due to construction work, so I saved them before the whole area is buried under tons of rubble. The first fossil (1-2) around the size of a finger, the "branch" was much longer before I broke it lose, around half a meter. Image 3-5 is the one I am most curious about, could it be a trace fossil of some sort. It's embedded in the shale, some of the lines are 0,5 cm deep. From wha
  18. opabinia

    Anomalocaridid Fossils?

    Anyone here have any Anomalocarididae fossils? I do realize that if anyone did they most likely wouldn't be on this site but just wanted to know. I also realize that they are extremely rare but that I've seen things on here comparable when speaking about rarity. (Kinzers Formation PA has confirmed - anomalocaris pennsylvanica.) Thanks;
  19. Anyone have any information on tectonic activity during the Cambrian Period? I am writing a report on tectonic activity on Earth and am going to use the Cambrian to explain the location of the Burgess Shale and Chengjiang formations. So far I have a good idea of what I am doing, just wanted some input from others. I'll reference anyone that responds. Thanks.
  20. Ancient arthropod with gnarly claws discovered in Burgess Shale Calgary Sun - ‎April 26, 2017‎ http://www.calgarysun.com/2017/04/26/ancient-anthropod-with-gnarly-claws-discovered-in-burgess-shale Paleontologists identify new 507-million-year-old sea creature with can opener-like pincers, University of Toronto, April 26, 2017‎ https://www.utoronto.ca/news/ouch-u-t-paleontologists-identify-508-million-year-old-sea-creature-can-opener-pincers https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/04/170426131024.htm This 508-million-year-old sea predator had a
  21. oilshale

    Margaretia dorus Walcott, 1931

    From the album: Plants

    Margaretia dorus Walcott, 1931 Middle Cambrian Burgess Shale Field British Columbia Canada Might be related to modern green algae Caulerpa, a genus of seaweeds
  22. Originally interpreted as a green algae with a relationship to the modern green alga Caulerpa, Margaretia dorus is now considered to be the feeding tube of the hemichordate Oesia. The position of Oesia is uncertain. Originally described as an annelid worm by Walcott (1911), a recent reinterpretation as a chaetognath (Szaniawski, 2005, 2009) has been vigorously rejected, and a position closer to the hemichordates proposed instead (Conway Morris, 2009). Margaretia dorus would now be a junior synonym of Oesia disjuncta Walcott, 1911 Lit.: Simon Conway Morris and R. A. Robison (
  23. SpringGroveUK

    Hyolith finds place on the tree of life

    "In the past, hyoliths have been interpreted as being related to molluscs, which are common today and include squid, clams and snails. The new research suggests the animals are in fact more closely related to a different group of shell-bearing organisms, known as lophophorata, which includes brachipods (lamp shells), among others." http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-38585325
  24. doushantuo

    oddball from deep time

    link expires nov.6th. Nb:large file get know Opabinia now,folks
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