Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'cambrian'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • blogs_blog_99
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • retired blog
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Books I have enjoyed
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • Between A Rock And A Hard Place
  • Rudist digging at "Point 25", St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria (Campanian, Gosau-group)
  • Prognathodon saturator 101
  • Trip Reports
  • Glendive Montana dinosaur bone Hell’s Creek
  • Ladonia Texas Fossil Park

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

  1. My question is this: Is it too late to enter for the FOTM? Just in case, I'll go ahead and write up my entry: Here are my October Fossil of the Month entries. These were found between Oct 5-8 1st: A complete (well, 98%) Olenellus clarki with both positive and negative. In 8 days of digging and splitting this is the only complete trilobite to split out cleanly and there may be only 3 others (partially buried) 2nd: A larger slab with 31 cephalons (compete and partials) and 1 possible complete trilobite (partially buried). This is by far the largest coll
  2. DardS8Br

    Yunnanozoon or something else?

    The longest one is roughly 2cm long. I’ve counted 12 on the rock, which itself is about 5cm long. All I know is that it’s from the Maotianshan shales in China. I was told it’s a Yunnanozoon, but I believe this is incorrect as the person I got it from is often wrong with their identifications.
  3. Sjfriend

    Latham Shale Slab Repair

    Found on my last trip to the Marble Mountains Latham Shale. I found this when just a little bit was sticking out of the hillside surface. Took me most of a day to extract. As you can see, it didn't as they say "come quietly" I used a couple little tubes of super glue to hold it together as much as possible before extracting it but it still came out in more then a few pieces I spent about a week getting it back together as much as possible (I mean really, who doesn't have some bolts and screws left over when putting their car back together ) I have a lot more advanced prep to loo
  4. Sjfriend

    Latham Shale unknowns

    OK, on my few trips to the Latham Shale in the Marble Mountains of Southern California I have found a few things that I'm just not sure of. I will include any info before each photo. Scale: little marks are 2mm, bigger numbered marks are cm 1: Ok, first I will include 2 photos of what I question as maybe trilobite hypostome. I haven't found any good illustrations of Olenellus hypostome. I've found probably 10 of these. They all look the same shape though many different sizes. 2: Next, I find a few of these each day. The cephalons from the trilobi
  5. Hardly anybody ever talks about the Cambrian fossils of the southern midcontinent (USA). They're super-underappreciated. Show us what you've got! Here's one to start us off: Thorax and pygidium of a trilobite, possibly Orygmaspis, typically referred to as "Orygmaspis cf. Orygmaspis llanoensis" but probably a different species altogether. Note the two pairs of macropleural spines marking the final thoracic segments. Davis Formation (late Cambrian: Furongian), south side of Highway 8, St. François County, Missouri.
  6. How many Myllokunmingia specimens are known to science? I keep on seeing wildly varying numbers, ranging from 1 to close to 100, and I really want to get a straight answer.
  7. Sorry if this is the wrong topic category, I don’t have much experience with this forum. I recently found out that there are Cambrian fossils in the Marble Mountains in California, and I’m wondering what the laws are for collecting there. I’ve always wanted to collect Cambrian fossils and that’s the closest location to me, but I don’t want to break any laws. If it is legal, what tools and equipment should I bring? Thanks!
  8. https://www.livescience.com/silver-specks-in-worm-dung Evidence for microbially mediated silver enrichment in a middle Cambrian Burgess Shale-type deposit, Mackenzie Mountains, northwestern Canada As a worms, bugs, and slime researcher, I found this to be exciting.
  9. ptera

    Cambrian Fossils

    Here are some fossils that I am pretty sure is from the ophir shale in utah. I've seen a lot of what looks like inarticulate brachiopods and little worm-like things. Does anyone have any more information? I was wondering what kind of fossils have been found in these rocks? Also, have any trilobites been found here?
  10. oilshale

    Isoxys paradoxus Hou 1987

    Vannier et al. 2006 assume that Tuzoia and the also Cambrian genus Isoxys are possibly representatives of the class Thylacocephala. Emmended diagnosis for the genus Isoxys by Garcia-Bellido 2009, p. 1224: ”Arthropod with one pair of cephalic appendages and a uniform series of at least 13 pairs of biramous appendages. Long, narrow body covered almostentirely by a bivalved, very thin unmineralized carapace. Prominent, stalked, spherical to pear-shaped lateral eyes protrude beyond the anterior margin of the carapace. Each valve armed with prominent cardinal spines. Dorsal outline straight or
  11. Kurufossils

    Mystery Huge Anomalocaris Appendange?

    Hi, I have this mystery piece of what appears to be anomalocarid appendage of sorts. The problem is I did not receive any information with it and it came out of an old collection from Maine, Usa. I'm not to sure what else it could be from the appearance but I am also very uncertain of the exact species. The piece of a very laminated sparkly shale If I had to guess it could've came from either Burgess Shale, Utah, or Nevada but I not sure what locality it could be from so if anyone if familiar with these shales and can tell from the preservation it would be a huge help, thank you and looking fo
  12. DardS8Br

    Lobopodian or not?

    Someone is selling this fossil at auction, saying they don’t know what it is, but it might be a lobopodian. Any ideas?
  13. BrennanThePaleoDude

    Rifle Range Cranbrook Trip Finds

    I embarked on a two day excavation trip in an attempt to find the raptorial appendage of Anomalocaris but only came home with about 300 Olenellus schucherti heads, some worm burrows, Wanneria bodies and heads, three Tuzoia, an inarticulate Brachiopod and some possible hyoliths, sponges and cyanobacteria. I am hoping to head back soon and do a paper on the locality! Here are a handful of my coolest finds!
  14. What is this thing? It looks like a platypus worm with spines coming out of its head. It’s from the Maotianshan Shale in Yunnan, China. What is it?
  15. oilshale

    Isoxys minor Luo et al. 2008

    Taxonomy according to fossilworks.org Vannier et al. 2006 assume that Tuzoia and the also Cambrian genus Isoxys are possibly representatives of the class Thylacocephala. The fossil probably shows rare soft part preservation of the frontal appendages and the stalked eyes. Emmended diagnosis for the genus Isoxys by Garcia-Bellido 2009, p. 1224: ”Arthropod with one pair of cephalic appendages and a uniform series of at least 13 pairs of biramous appendages. Long, narrow body covered almost entirely by a bivalved, very thin unmineralized carapace. Prominent, stalked, spherical to pe
  16. oilshale

    Isoxys auritus (Jiang, 1982)

    Taxonomy according to Fossilworks.org. Isoxys auritus was originally erected as Cymbia auritus Jiang, 1982 on the basis of a single specimen from the Lower Cambrian Helinpu Formation, eastern Yunnan, China, and was synonymized with Isoxys by Conway Morris (1985). Vannier et al. 2006 assume that Tuzoia and the also Cambrian genus Isoxys are possibly representatives of the class Thylacocephala. Emmended diagnosis for the genus Isoxys by Garcia-Bellido 2009, p. 1224: ”Arthropod with one pair of cephalic appendages and a uniform series of at least 13 pairs of biramous appendages. Lo
  17. Scylla

    Oldest Bryzoan

    New Bryzoan fossils push back age of oldest Bryzoan and give clues to origins. https://ecoevocommunity.nature.com/amp/posts/a-cambrian-origin-for-the-colonial-phylum-bryozoa
  18. Synonym: †Archotuba conoidalis Hou et al., 1999, †Cambrorhytium sp. Chen & Zhou, 1997 Quote from ‘The Cambrian Fossils of Chengjiang, China: The Flowering of Early Animal Life, Second Edition’: Hou Xian-Guang et al., p. 136: “This species is relatively common with hundreds of known specimens, which are essentially the remains of the tubes of the animal. All of the specimens are preserved as compressed fossils, in which a whitish color, sometimes with rusty patches. No proboscis or other soft parts of the animal have been discovered. The tube is shaped like an elongated cone. Lar
  19. Syndy

    Easter eggs

    I was looking for an answer that could not be drudged up anywhere I could find. Inexperienced, and a little ignorant with regards to such topics as I might be I still believe this might be a fossilized egg, or not...can you ID the rock I have? Please?
  20. Tidgy's Dad

    Adam's Cambrian

    A rangeomorph holdfast trace fossil from the Ediacara formation, Rawnsley quartzite of the Flinders Range, South Australia. This specimen is Medusina mawsoni, so called because it was until recently thought to be a jellyfish, but is now believed to be the attachment point of a fractal rangeomorph as Charniodiscus is the point of anchorage for Charnia sp. This one may have been the holdfast point for some species of Rangea. The diameter of the outer circle is 1.5 cm and the fossil is estimated to be 555 million years old.
  21. Taxonomy from Vannier et al. (2007, p. 458). Vannier et al. 2006 assume that Tuzoia and the also Cambrian genus Isoxys are possibly representatives of the class Thylacocephala. Revised diagnosis for the genus Tuzoia Walcott, 1912 in Vannier et al. (2007, pp. 458–459): “Large bivalved arthropod (valve length up to approx. 180 mm; Chlupác and Kordule, 2002). Carapace thin, nonmineralized, and relatively flexible, folded dorsally (no true articulated hinge) into two hemispherical valves. Valve outline amplete or slightly preplete/postplete (L:H ratio between 1.3 and 1.6). Straight or sl
  22. Hi All, I am wondering if anyone can assess the authenticity of this Acadoparadoxides from Morocco? From what I can tell there is restoration on the right eye and maybe margin of the cephalon. Beyond that I think it is real. It does appear to be missing one thoracic segment but I am guessing this is taphonomic. I can take more pics as needed. Thanks for the help.
  23. I would like to use photographs of fossils as part of my digital artwork. I do not want to violate any copyright laws if I later sell the artwork. Does anyone know where I can find free-use images of fossils or does anyone mind sharing their personal fossil photographs with me? I will give credit to you for your photography if I decide to use the images in my work. Fossils of any type and from any time period are appreciated. Thank you!
  24. oilshale

    †Tuzoia sinensis P'an 1957

    Taxonomy from Vannier et al. (2007, p. 458). Vannier et al. 2006 assume that Tuzoia and the also Cambrian genus Isoxys are possibly representatives of the class Thylacocephala. Revised diagnosis for the genus Tuzoia Walcott, 1912 in Vannier et al. (2007, pp. 458–459): “Large bivalved arthropod (valve length up to approx. 180 mm; Chlupác and Kordule, 2002). Carapace thin, nonmineralized, and relatively flexible, folded dorsally (no true articulated hinge) into two hemispherical valves. Valve outline amplete or slightly preplete/postplete (L:H ratio between 1.3 and 1.6). Straight or sl
  25. “Absolutely Mind-Boggling” Massive New Animal Species Discovered in 500 Million-Year-Old Burgess Shale. SciTechDaily, September 8, 2021 ‘Spaceship-Shaped’ Fossil Reveals Hungry Predator of Ancient Oceans Titanokorys gainesi, turned up in the Canadian Rockies, was among the largest known predators 500 million years ago. Trilobites, New York Times A Football-Shaped Animal Species Is Discovered In A 500-Million-Year- Old Shale, NPR, September 9, 2021 The open access paper is: Caron, J.-B., and Moysiuk, J., 2021. A giant nektobenthic ra
×
×
  • Create New...