Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'canada'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • retired blog
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Books I have enjoyed
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • Between A Rock And A Hard Place
  • Rudist digging at "Point 25", St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria (Campanian, Gosau-group)
  • Prognathodon saturator 101

Calendars

  • Calendar

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Found 279 results

  1. A Fossilized Thing

    Hi again! I’m totally stumped with this one. The rock is limestone, so its not the Billings formation. There is still some matrix on it, but most of the surface is exposed. It’s spherical and slightly faceted. Fossil pearl?
  2. Mummified ice age wolf pup and caribou found in northern Canada The rare remains of an ice-age wolf pup and a caribou will offer insights about life in Canada's far north more than 50,000 years ago, scientists say. https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-45527525
  3. Canadian Trilobite?

    I just found this guy hiding in the back of my collection. No idea how long he’s been back there, but I’m pretty sure I found him on the shores of Lake Erie, on the Canada side. Looks to be a weathers trilobite to me, possibly Isotelus, but, admittedly, I know very little about these bugs. Hopefully some of the experts out there can clear things up. Thanks! JPC
  4. Help ID Fossils From Manitoulin Island

    Hello, I just got back from my first fossil hunting trip and am hoping to get a little help to ID some of my finds. These were found on Manitoulin Island off HWY 6 & New England Rd, I`m sure a few people on here have already been there. I didn`t do any digging or picking but I managed to find a few specimens laying around worth bringing home. Fossil #1 Approx 6cm by 6cm total, gonna take a wild guess that it`s some sort of shell Fossil #2 Approx 7cm by 11cm total, looks like corral to me, lots of little bits in the area like this but this was the nicest one I found Fossil #3 Approx 5cm by 3cm total, no idea what this could be Fossil #4 Approx 12cm by 14cm total, again have no idea what these could be Fossil #5 Approx 7cm by 5cm total, possible the tip of a larger shell? Fossil? #6 Approx 12cm by 14cm total, not sure if this one is even a fossil or just mineral veins. I would be grateful for any help ID these finds, thanks in advance.
  5. Hello everyone, I found the following fossils along the cost of Lake Huron in Ontario last weekend, and was hoping I could get some help identifying them. I've tried guessing at what they are, but I'm rather inexperienced with this. I also have no clue as to the time periods, sorry! The first one I assumed was some kind of gastropod
  6. Evidence of a Limited Biosphere 1.4 Billion Years Ago Louisiana State University and McGill University https://www.mcgill.ca/newsroom/channels/news/billion-year-old-lake-deposit-yields-clues-earths-ancient-biosphere-288081 https://www.lsu.edu/mediacenter/news/2018/07/23gg_hayles_bao_nature.php The paper is: Crockford, P.W., Hayles, J.A., Bao, H., Planavsky, N.J., Bekker, A., Fralick, P.W., Halverson, G.P., Bui, T.H., Peng, Y. and Wing, B.A., 2018. Triple oxygen isotope evidence for limited mid-Proterozoic primary productivity. Nature, Letter | Published: 18 July 2018 https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-018-0349-y Yours, Paul H.
  7. Gros morne newfoundland fossil?

    Curious if this is a fossil or not and if so, what would it be? It’s quite interesting for sure.
  8. Any ideas?

    Found at the Mountain Park Formation near Cadomin AB, unsure of age. Found amongst Metasequoia fragments. My first thought was some sort of seed cone, maybe bark?
  9. Mcabee Fossils

    First time posting here, thought i'd share a plate of Metasequoia that I found at the Macabee site near Cache Creek BC a number of years ago. More to follow if there's interest.
  10. Is this a fossil?

    So I recently found this one on a beach on Lake Erie in Canada. I was just wondering what it could be... fossil or nah? Thanks!
  11. Marine reptile fossils found at Fort McMurray area worksite Ancient reptile skeleton is approximately 60 per cent complete CBC News and Fort McMurray Today articles, July 18, 2018 https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton/plesiosaur-fort-mcmurray-syncrude-1.4752748 http://www.fortmcmurraytoday.com/2018/07/18/dinosaur-remains-discovered-at-syncrude-north-mine An older and related article: More fossils of marine dinosaurs discovered at Syncrude By Vincent McDermott, Fort McMurray Today, July 17, 2017 http://www.fortmcmurraytoday.com/2017/07/17/more-fossils-of-marine-dinosaurs-discovered-at-syncrude P.S. I am *not* responsilbe for the content of the headlines. Yours, Paul H.
  12. Dorchester Cape (July 2018)

    I hadn't blogged in a while, but here's my latest excursion (I have more but I'll have to dig up the information, and some are still pending field work/research) On July 5th I went for a drive down Beaumont, in the Memramcook region in South-Eastern New Brunswick (Canada), to check how bad the road along the coast had eroded with time since the last time I went down there rock picking. I stopped in a few places to check on the rocks down the beach wherever I could go down, and spotted the cliffs of Dorchester Cape across the Memramcook river. Hopped in the car and proceeded to make the short few kilometers trek to the other side. Location indicator shows Dorchester Cape on the map (Google Maps) Location of the cliffs The geology of the area is mostly formed of Upper Carboniferous rocks, and the location I was at is mostly Boss Point formation. The Boss Point formation is also found in Cape Enrage, Rockport, and Upper Joggins, to name a few places. The fossils that I find at the Dorchester Cape site is mostly discombobulate plant material, with dark grey to tan sandstones with some sandy conglomerate boulders lying about. Chunks of gypsum and some Albertite can be seen on the beach, as evaporites abound in the Albert Mines area, and some other unspecified locations in the Memramcook area. Albertite, and then gypsum, were an important part of the local economy, especially in Hillsborough across the river, as the geology of the surrounding area sees large deposits of various evaporites, a relic of the ancient Windsor Sea which would have receeded, giving way to vast forests and rivers. But what was most important for Dorchester Cape was the copper found in the sedimentary rocks. This copper ore, chalcocite, was discovered in the late 1860s and mined until all operations came to a stop before the First Great War. Dorchester Copper Mine. K. Vanderwolf. New Brunswick Museum. From Memramcook, I drove down the 106 towards Dorchester. Once in the village, you take the 935, which is Cape Road, heading towards Dorchester Cape. The road turns into a dirt road about 2 clicks after the train tracks. Turn into the dirt road across the Atlantic Industries Limited business site. Make your way down the road, avoiding pot holes and man made roadblocks, and you'll eventually reach the old wharf. Make your way South (left of the wharf) and head towards the cliffs near Cole Point. Looking back, view of Fort Folly Point slicing Shepody Bay. As we get closer to the rock cliffs, you can already spot coal and petrified wood on the beach. The plant fossils are mostly fragmented, showing signs of turbulence. There's some micro faulting in some places, and large sections of the cliffs are coming down in large segments. Plastered with plants/tree parts (hat for scale) The beach is littered with petrified wood, plant fossils, and chunks of coal. Middle section replaced with orange calcite crystals Some pieces are quite large (dirty hat for scale) Common theme: plants sticking out to catch some Sun One of the few holes where trees used to lie in situ The cliffs have coal seams that can reach a few inches thick. Tree imprint Nice tree sticking out (squished hat for scale) Close to the tree NOT sand (chances of lithification?)
  13. Triarthrus finds

    Hello again! This post will be about some beautifully preserved Triarthrus fossils (and my first complete Trilobite finds). Some of them even have the eyes preserved! I found these at a local train station, and the site of significant construction lately. I believe most of the to be E. eotoni, and the last one to be E. rougensis or spinosus. It may not be visible in the picture, but the last one has a streak of pyrite along the side of its cephalon / upper thorax. Could this be some kind of soft body tissue preservation, similar to those of the Beecher's Trilobite bed?
  14. Fossil ID

    This may or may not actually be a fossil. It is a cylindrical, shimmering white streak on the Shale. It is only about an inch long. This may just be another mineral inclusion, or some discoloured sediment. Any help with identifying this would be appreciated!
  15. Ordovician Road Cut

    Yesterday, I was lucky enough to attend a very special field trip with the Eastern Ontario Natural History Society to a massive road cut in Ontario. The rock exposed was Ordovician aged limestone, and it produced some amazing fossils. I might need some id help with some of these. The giant cephalopod was by far the best thing I found! 1. Giant Cephalopod (with hand for scale) Camerocerad or Endoceras? 2. Crinoid stems, bryozoans and Gastropod 3. Partial trilobite pygidia
  16. Albertosaurus Tooth ID

    Years ago I acquired this tooth and I was going to put something on it to make a necklace for it but never did. I just found it sitting in a drawer and just want to verify it’s ID. It was identified as an Albertosaurus tooth from the Cretaceous of Canada- no other info. @Troodon Frank what do you think?
  17. Splitting Nodules And Concretions

    Hello TFF members! I have just found several strange circular rocks on a fossil hunt a few minutes ago, which I believe to be either nodules or concretions. What should I do to split these rocks? I know that I should probably not try to break them with a hammer and chisel, and instead use the freeze-thaw process. This is my first experience with nodules or concretions, so I am not very knowledgeable on this topic. Is there a specific recommended length of time I should leave them in the cold? How long should I thaw them for? How many times should I put them through the process before seeing cracks? How cold should the environment be for the freezing to work? If they are in fact nodules or concretions, I will post pictures of my finds (or lack thereof)!
  18. Agnostid?

    I found this fossil a few days ago at an exposure of the Billings Shale. It was found associated with Triarthrus glabellas and brachiopods. It's structure leads me to believe that it's either an Isotelus pygidium or an agnostid, although I do not know of any agnostics described in this formation and age.
  19. Anthology Of Unidentified Fossils

    Hi again! This will probably be my last ID post for a while. This time, I've decided to put all of the Unidentified fossils in one post. These are all from the Ordovician aged Billings Shale. Help identifying these will be much appreciated! 1. Leaf-shaped imprint. Mineral inclusion? 2. Trilobite fragment? 3. Dark markings and furrows. Burrows?
  20. Hello TTF! This post will contain the pictures of my science fair board, as well as the awards I received from it. Sorry for the delay, I know that some members posted requests for these months ago, but I have been busy with other things lately. I actually left part of the board at school by accident for weeks. I hope the pictures are clear enough!
  21. Fossil ID Required

    These little guys are super common when you break open the shale, along the banks of Lake Ontario, East of Toronto, in Whitby. I have scoured the internet trying to find what this can be, however the only other picture I found was on someones Blog with no identification. Any help would be appreciated, I'm so interested and this fossil hunting/identification may become a new hobby Thank you, Georgie
  22. Repairing Fossils In Shale

    Recently, I have been out fossil hunting more often than usual, and many of them have since been damaged. Some were broken during transportation, and others were broken as I excavated them. The fossils are all from the black Billings Shale, which fractures easily. Is there any way that I can repair them without leaving any obvious markings?
  23. Triarthrus?

    Hi TFF! I have just found a very interesting fossil near my home which I suspect might be the articulated left and right pleura of a Triarthrus. I have already found other fragments of Triarthrus in the same rock outcrop. (Glabellas, pleura, cephalons, etc.) It may also be a graptolite or something similar.
×