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  1. I was lucky enough last week to be able to make my second donation to the collections of the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago. This donation consisted of two Mazon Creek finds from the river itself, both collected on the I&M Canal outing last year. The first is an extremely rare tetrapod larva. The second fossil is an exceedingly well-preserved Orthacanthus tooth, featuring serrations in the cusp, a very rare trait for Mazon Creek teeth of this sort. It may prove to be complete as well. I was able to visit the museum to make
  2. Hello dear forum members, among the collection of my late uncle there was a box of coal fossils, most of which are flat crumbly pieces of plant material. I left most of these in their protective wrappings for now. among the fragments on the bottom of the box I found some nodules, I think these caught my uncles eye and where collected on the same trip as the plant fossils. (from Germany, hard coal, not lignite, thats all I know). The nodules are heavy like ore minerals (pyrite comes to mind) There is one with an interesting texture. Maybe a coprolite?? @GeschWhat?
  3. Lucid_Bot

    Five Holes in an Arch

    Found this the other day in what I think is brush creek limestone. The area is Glenshaw Formation, Carboniferous (Pennsylvanian). All help is appreciated.
  4. Yesterday I finally made it out to one of my favorite hunting spots after (almost exactly) a year away. This road cut in La Salle County Illinois had been visited earlier this year (I believe) by @Nimravis, @aek and @connorp, but I really wanted a crack at it before summer fully kicked in. As I had been warned, it was already heavily overgrown, with poison ivy located intermittently across the slope. There were also mosquitoes in the shady areas and wasps in the sunny ones. However, with some delicate maneuvering I was able to avoid most of the hazards, with only some mosquito bit
  5. Lucid_Bot

    Pennsylvanian Snails and Clams?

    Hello again, I found these tiny specimens today, and I'm not quite sure what they are. If I had to guess, I'd say the spiral shelled creature is Amphiscapha and the more clamish one looks a bit like Kozlowskia without the little side wings. No idea what the last one is. As always, all help is greatly appreciated. Also, sorry about the bad pics, these are quite small specimens.
  6. Lucid_Bot

    Pennsylvanian Marine Fossil?

    Howdy! Chiseled this out of a rock today. I thought it was a coral at first, but not quite sure now. The final picture is a cross section of the inside. Thanks in advance.
  7. Last year @jdp was kind enough to identify the tiny and jumbled skeleton I found in a concretion in eastern Illinois http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/107472-mysterious-jumble-inside-pennsylvanian-concretion/ as a lysorophian tetrapod and direct me to the Field Museum in Chicago as a possible repository for it. This month I finally completed the donation and it has been added to their collection, a fantastic event for someone who has been visiting the museum for more than 30 years to gaze in wonder at their world-class collection. Thank you again to @jdp and The Fossil Forum for m
  8. Marco90

    Pecopteris villosa

    From the album: My collection in progress

    Pecopteris villosa Brongniart 1822 Location: Mazon Creek, Illinois, USA Age: 323 - 299 Mya (Pennsylvanian, Carboniferous) Measurements: 2x12,5 cm Kingdom: Plantae Division: Polypodiophyta Class: Polypodiopsida Subclass: Marattiidae Order: Marattiales Family: Marattiaceae
  9. oilshale

    Mazon Creek, ID needed

    What could it be - size is around 1" or 2.5 cm? Some sort of shrimp? I can't check the literature. I am in Maryland right now at my daughter's place doing babysitting. Man, is that exhausting!
  10. I am going to start adding some images of my favorite finds which I call Collection Pieces. Identifications range from maybe, probably to most likely. I've only started to seriously collect over the past year. I've spent a great deal of time studying and learning Geology, as a hobby. I am located in Western Pennsylvania. At first, a map of the area. Anything in bright yellow is the Glenshaw Formation. The Ames Limestone layer exists between the Glenshaw and the Casselman Formations, which is the Orange color on the map. I have yet to explore the Ames Limestone, so I've only found f
  11. cngodles

    Pentagon shaped piece

    When cleaning up rocks I brought home today, I found this little piece that I didn't originally target. It's pentagon shape makes me believe it's for sure a fossil. I've never found anything like it, so I feel like I'm about to get an education here. Perhaps part of a crinoid? Whatever it is, I don't have the experience, yet. Also noticed the indented hole on the top. Maybe part of it, maybe not. It's way too centered I think to not be part of it. Underside. It is convex with a small raised ridge along the edge. Sideways view of the
  12. I live in Chicago and for a while I’ve been wanting to try Fossil Hunting in Mazon Creek. My first trip three weekends ago I tried to have myself prepared but still wasn’t quite sure what I was getting myself into. I hiked to the tipple area, there I had a really hard time telling rocks from concretions because especially in that area most of the rocks are covered in an orange rust. I collected 5 gallons of what I later realized were almost exclusively rocks. The trip was still worth it though because there were lots of these fast little lizards running around on top of the exposed coal, a
  13. Top Trilo

    Two Trilobite Document Requests

    I was wondering if anyone knew where I could find a copy of either one of these documents. Hahn, G., Hahn, R. 1996 Die Trilobiten-Taxa des Karbons und Perms: 2. Brachymetopidae. [The Trilobite Taxa of the Carboniferous and Permian: 2. Brachymetopidae.] Courier Forschungsinstitut Senckenberg, 195:1-242 Hahn, G., Hahn, R., Müller, P. 2019 Catalogus Trilobitorum Figuris (Trilobites Carbonici et Permici, IX. Cystispininae, Globusiinae, Proetinae). [A Catalog of Trilobites with Figures (Trilobites Carboniferous and Permian, 9. Cystispininae, Globusiinae, Pro
  14. Exactly what the title says, I was wondering which trilobite genera survived into the Carboniferous period. There is this paper, Weller, J. Marvin. “Carboniferous Trilobite Genera.” however I haven't been able to find a free copy online and its 86 years old so a little outdated. . There is also this, https://www.trilobites.info/lasttrilos.htm, from Sam Gon's trilobite website which has all the Trilobite genera of the Permian but obviously doesn't include the ones that went extinct during the Carboniferous. I was going to just search for the time frame for each of the trilobite gen
  15. Runner64

    Mazon Creek Collection

    I'll update this thread with my Mazon Collection over the next few weeks. With some good weather out yesterday, I managed to get my first fossil hunt in for the season and will post a report in this topic. I will be moving this upcoming summer which will put me even further from Mazon Creek so I have purchased a few pieces to fill in the genus/species I haven't found yet and will mention if I purchased a fossil. I still hold out hope to find some of these pieces I purchased eventually but will realistically be difficult if I only can make 1 trip a year. Fauna Tullimo
  16. will stevenson

    Burlington crinoids

    Hi guys I’ve got these two crazy carboniferous crinoids (sorry I couldn’t resist the alliteration ) from the Burlington formation, I was wondering if anyone could help me ID them, thanks!
  17. Hi all. Took another trip to our closest site yesterday - a Carboniferous marine deposit on the shores of the Firth of Forth, Scotland. Amongst the usual Bivalves and more familiar shapes (which I may need to ask about on here at some point - as I have only the wildest guess of what they actually are) we found the below. It looks for all the world like a coarsely textured skin of small scales. I'm aware that soft tissue preservation is incredibly rare, so am dubious - but I don't know what else it might be. Anyone able to help? Nb. I haven't done any work on this at al
  18. connorp

    Pennsylvanian fish bit

    I recently found this bit of fish bone in the LaSalle Limestone of Illinois (Upper Pennsylvanian). Measures about 1cm in width. I know that tiny bone bits are tough to identify, but the surface texture on this one seems pretty interesting. I haven't found anything similar before. The positive is shown above, although I think the negative shows the surface texture better. Can anything be said about this? @jdp @RCFossils @deutscheben Thanks for any help.
  19. Lucid_Bot

    Hidden Fossil

    Hi, I found this beautiful little asterophyllites yesterday and noticed that there seems to be some rock covering part of the fossil. I'd like to be able to remove the rock and expose the fossil. It's very solid and too thin for any of my chisels. Would an air-abrasive pen or dental equipment work? Perhaps professional help would be appropriate.
  20. I don't expect this one to be easily solvable. I've found nearly two dozen Petalodus teeth over time, so I have a good idea of what the cross section looks like for the tooth material. The white edges with the canals reaching inward. You can't see it will in the photo but there is a calcite grain structure in the center. This piece was oddly shaped and fragile. It's unlike any of the surrounding rock. There are 4 pieces in all, but this one has the best look. The lumps at the bottom edge are raised and textured like the surface of some teeth are. The scale along the bot
  21. Spent the day at the famous old cut in Sulphur, Indiana yesterday, and while I didn’t come away with a Mississippian shark tooth, I’m wondering if other parts of these animals preserved? This piece is shiny black like coal, about an inch long, is definitely fossilized, and was found in the Big Clifty formation. Anyone here an expert on Carboniferous sharks or has found anything similar?
  22. From the album: Plants

    Asterophyllites equisetiformis Stéphanian , Carboniferous , Graissessac ; Hérault France
  23. I was finally able to bring my car down from Michigan to D.C. this winter which has really expanded the range of accessible localities (and also avoids the torturous process of renting cars) for me. I don't have many nice in situ pictures unfortunately, but here are some of the cleaned up finds from the trips so far this year! First we tried Matoaka Beach Cabins with some success, lots of little teeth with one great highlight (unsure on ID, let me know if that's clear from the picture). Also had good luck with a complete Ecphora and Moon Snail, as well as a decent sized chunk of sa
  24. Last Sunday I took the day to scout some former coal-mined land in western Indiana as well as revisit some sites I hadn’t been to in a few years. The mines at these sites were working the Springfield, Hymera, and Danville coals at various points in the mid-late 20th century. The land has been reclaimed to varying degrees, but I hoped that typical Mazon Creek-like fossil-bearing concretions could still be found, despite almost no information in the literature. Temperatures were a little chilly with the wind blowing as I arrived at the first site. There to greet me was a he
  25. cngodles

    A plant in limestone?

    This one has been sitting in my "interesting but I have no clue" pile for a while. When I found it, I was splitting limestone laying in the stream. I've found that when you split limestone, immediately after splitting you'll get a couple moments of a sharp looking specimen before things start to oxidize. The limestone is a very dark gray, or almost black color. You either see black limestone or white calcite pieces while splitting. I split this particular piece open and right in the middle was a 3-4 cm long, 8 mm wide gold looking rectangle in the middle of the flat broken limeston
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