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  1. One of the nice things about collecting Mazon Creek concretions is that most specimens don't require any prep - they open up and are good to go. This however was not one of those cases. This concretion exploded during freeze thaw last year into hundreds of pieces, and on most pieces the fossils were still covered by sections of shale. It took around 25 hours in total to reassemble the concretion and prep out what wasn't exposed. Big thanks to Kris @Ptychodus04 for helping to finish the prep work. This is a large frond of the rare fern Mariopteris nervosa.
  2. I've been to a least a few museums where they would have a part of an exhibit dedicated to the Carboniferous era (of which the Field Museum's section for that in the Evolving Planet is pretty good). But I do wonder what would it be like if a whole A grade small to medium sized museum opened dedicated solely to the fossils found in the Mazon Creek area, including the Essex Fauna. It could be located close to the Mazonia-Braidwood State Fish and Wildlife area and include life sized reconstructions of both the terrestrial and aquatic environments. It could also be a place where fossil hunters cou
  3. Yesterday I stopped by another good friend of mine (Marty) that I have known for about 30 years. He has been collecting Mazon Creek fossils a lot longer that I have and also use to collect with my mentor Walter. Every once in a while he contacts me and has me stop by to pick up Mazon Creek concretions that he does not want and I go through them and place them into 5 gallon buckets for the ESCONI Braceville trip. I then bring the buckets and dump fossils for the participants. Here is a picture of the bags that I picked up yesterday. Marty also pointed
  4. Welsh Wizard

    Carboniferous Hash Plate

    Here’s a small hash plate from the Carboniferous of Lancashire in the U.K. I found it a couple of years ago but I have only just got around to cutting it down to a displayable size. It was part of a much larger block and now it’s about 4 inches by 4 inches. It contains a crinoid calyx, some crinoid ossicles and stem pieces and bits of coral. It is from a place called Salthill Quarry
  5. A 319-million-year-old brain has been discovered. It could be the oldest of its kind By Amarachi Orie, CNN, February 2, 2023 Scientists Discover 319-Million-Year-Old Fossilized Brain Amada Kooser, CNET, February 1, 2023 The paper is: Figueroa, R.T., Goodvin, D., Kolmann, M.A. et al. Exceptional fossil preservation and evolution of the rayfinned fish brain. Nature (2023). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-022-05666-1 Yours, Paul H.
  6. Greetings, friends. I have some very exciting news on a personal front: My first ever museum donation is this Mazon Creek Belotelsonid, which is going to the Indiana State Museum! Using advice from elsewhere on TFF, I reached out to their team a couple of days ago to ask if they might want it and surely enough they did!
  7. connorp

    Mazon Creek pollen organ

    This concretion opened up recently and I'm pretty stumped. My best guess is that this is a lateral view of some sort of pollen organ, but I haven't been able to find a match in literature. I was hoping someone here might have an idea? @paleoflor @RCFossils @fiddlehead
  8. connorp

    Mazon Creek Flora

    I've been spending a lot of time lately studying the Mazon Creek flora, and am continuously astonished by the diversity and quality of specimens that can be found. I don't think we see enough plants on the forum, so I figured I would go ahead and share some of my favorite finds. First is a specimen I recently shared, and a fitting start to the thread. This is Crenulopteris acadica, the most common true fern found in the Mazon Creek flora. It has been the most common plant I find, accounting for probably half my finds. Next is a favorite of mine. This is a s
  9. sheetmetaldad95

    NE Oklahoma Fossil Deposits

    Hey everyone, I've been trying to plan a little trip for me and my family to go on a little fossil hunt. I live in Bartlesville Oklahoma and I have several nice places I can go to find fossils all over. Mainly mississippian and Pennsylvanian. I'm looking for areas within an hour or so drive from where I live. I'm aware of the pliestocene finds in the arkansas river in tulsa area. I'd love for someone to send me maps or geologic surveys showing what areas in the topography, and other recomendations. Places I've been to worth noting: Kaw Lake spillway, Ponca City (good shells everyw
  10. icycatelf

    Weird Calamites Fossil

    Appears to be several clustered together. I was thinking that it could be the base of the plant, where several stems branched off a shared rhizome (as seen in figure a). Thoughts?
  11. As I have been researching large ctenacanthiform sharks from North America, I've been wondering if there are any known globally that are currently unnamed. I definitely know of the large Ctenacanthiformes Saivodus stratus (found in both what is now North America and Great Britain), the large Ctenacanthiform from the Permian Kaibab formation in Arizona, and the 'Texas supershark' (a likely large species of Gilkmanius) from the Pennsylvanian Texas Graham formation (all three as larger or larger than an adult Great White Shark (Carcharodon carcharias)). But are there any large ctenac
  12. Fullux

    Arthropleura?

    I'm interested in this Arthropleura fossil and I just want to make sure it's legit. The seller says it's a pleurosegment from the tail of a younger individual. They also point out that there are Mariopteris remains.
  13. I am going to start adding some images of my favorite finds which I call Collection Pieces. Identifications range from maybe, probably to most likely. I've only started to seriously collect over the past year. I've spent a great deal of time studying and learning Geology, as a hobby. I am located in Western Pennsylvania. At first, a map of the area. Anything in bright yellow is the Glenshaw Formation. The Ames Limestone layer exists between the Glenshaw and the Casselman Formations, which is the Orange color on the map. I have yet to explore the Ames Limestone, so I've only found f
  14. Recently, I've been thinking about conducting an exploratory fossil hunting trip in the St. Louis area of Missouri. I've never been there before, but I've heard there is a lot of caves and limestone outcrops near the city. I've also heard there is a decent amount of Ordovician and Mississippian fossils in the area. I'm just wondering if anyone's been fossil hunting in the St. Louis area before and what fossils can be found there?
  15. As I was recently doing some research on the prehistoric shark genus Cladodus, I came across some info that classifies the genus as a member of the family Cladoselachidae, Order Cladoselachiformes. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cladoselachidae This is somewhat confusing to me as mindat and the Paleontological Database aka fossilworks list Cladodus as a member of the family Ctenacanthidae, Order Ctenacanthiformes. https://www.mindat.org/taxon-8657177.html http://www.fossilworks.org/cgi-bin/bridge.pl?a=taxonInfo&taxon_no=104838
  16. From the album: Steinbruch Piesberg (Osnabrück, Germany)

    Sphenopteris coemansii Andrae in Stur 1877

    © T.K.T. Wolterbeek

  17. From the album: Steinbruch Piesberg (Osnabrück, Germany)

    Sphenopteris coemansii Andrae in Stur 1877

    © T.K.T. Wolterbeek

  18. From the album: Steinbruch Piesberg (Osnabrück, Germany)

    Sphenopteris coemansii Andrae in Stur 1877

    © T.K.T. Wolterbeek

  19. From the album: Steinbruch Piesberg (Osnabrück, Germany)

    Sphenopteris coemansii Andrae in Stur 1877

    © T.K.T. Wolterbeek

  20. From the album: Steinbruch Piesberg (Osnabrück, Germany)

    Sphenopteris coemansii Andrae in Stur 1877

    © T.K.T. Wolterbeek

  21. From the album: Steinbruch Piesberg (Osnabrück, Germany)

    Sphenopteris coemansii Andrae in Stur 1877

    © T.K.T. Wolterbeek

  22. From the album: Steinbruch Piesberg (Osnabrück, Germany)

    Sphenopteris coemansii Andrae in Stur 1877

    © T.K.T. Wolterbeek

  23. From the album: Steinbruch Piesberg (Osnabrück, Germany)

    Sphenopteris artemisiaefolioides Crépin 1881

    © T.K.T. Wolterbeek

  24. From the album: Steinbruch Piesberg (Osnabrück, Germany)

    Sphenopteris artemisiaefolioides Crépin 1881

    © T.K.T. Wolterbeek

  25. From the album: Steinbruch Piesberg (Osnabrück, Germany)

    Sphenopteris artemisiaefolioides Crépin 1881

    © T.K.T. Wolterbeek

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