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  1. steviefossils

    Monmouth Chub

    Found this chub tooth from NJ Miocene. Tooth is 1.25" on a straight vertical line from left lobe to tip (not along the diagonal). Took a lot of effort: 2.5 years to narrow down a location, and 6 hours of searching. Found it in the last half hr of the trip. Satisfying to have found, but a bigger tooth would have been nice for the effort required. That's just the luck of the hunt though. Hopefully there will be more to come. Thanks for viewing.
  2. steviefossils

    Monmouth Chubutensis

    Hi all. I wanted to share this chub tooth I found towards the end of 2021. From Monmouth, NJ, I think Kirkwood formation. One of my targeted species for the year and was able to find one in about 20 hrs worth of searching.
  3. Jerrychang

    Cusps of mega-toothed shark

    We should all agree that the side cusps of these shark gradually disappeared with evolution, but how did they deform in the process of shrinking and disappearing ? Does the cusps’s tip gradually move closer to the middle crown and fuse together? Just like the two teeth in the picture below, is the brown specimen older than the other?
  4. I plan to collect fossil teeth from cretolamna to megalodons, and arrange them in order of color and size. I have got these three and are still working on it. Although they are not big and not perfect, they’re still very beautiful and fulfilling when placed together. It’s quite hard to find the right size shape and color. Might need some help with the auriculatus.
  5. eddie

    Indonesian meg

    Finally broke down and got a few nice Indonesian megs. This is the nicest one, it's blue and 5 3/8" long. Fits in nicely with my small collection of larger megs.
  6. ThePhysicist

    Hubbell Megalodon

    From the album: Sharks

    Hubbell (juvenile) megalodon, likely from the East Coast. I don't understand the hype surrounding megalodon, but this one was cool enough for the collection. It has good preservation, and the tip is spalled-off from feeding.
  7. So, I've been hunting sharks teeth on and off in South Alabama since a young child. Since my two kids have gotten self sufficient, me and the wife have been taking alot of trips to the river to look for teeth. Finding the normal small teeth, for our area, got me to wondering if there were bigger teeth in our area. That led me to some late nights of researching the ins and outs of my area. The area we are close to has alot of Eocene era fossils and I quickly learned the Carcharocles auriculatus was THE SHARK during this time period. So, my goal became to find a complete tooth in my little honey
  8. Taxonomic debate over extinct lamniformes remains a big thing, but I've noticed that it seems like there hasn't been any studies that use modern phylogenetic techniques (i.e. maximum parsimony) to resolve issues with extinct taxa (i.e. Carcharodon, Isurus, Macrorhizodus, Otodus). Is there a reason for this absence, or perhaps I simply have not come across one that already exists? I suppose it's possible that dental characteristics alone as character codes for a phylogenetic matrix may not be viable...
  9. While this tooth is obviously damaged, the cusplet sticks out to me. It is a decent sized tooth around 3 and 3/8" (84MM) long. Serrations are evident, although have been eroded. This tooth came from the James River, South Carolina. I cannot decide whether it looks more like auriculatus, chubutensis, augustidens, or megalodon. Carcharocles/Otodus... take your pick. I'd appreciate any input - thank you.
  10. I've been going through my shark tooth collection recently trying to refine my ids. This one here has me somewhat stumped. I had identified it as Carcharhinus priscus, but I'm not at all sure any more and am now starting to wonder if it may be a chub or great white. The first photo, which I think is the labial view, seems to fit, but what I believe to be the lingual view (2nd photo) has me confused. The tooth is from the southern German Miocene Burdigalian. Slant length 15mm. Any advice here would be appreciated.
  11. Free Access pdf link: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/08912963.2020.1861608?needAccess=true Shimada, K., Bonnan, M. F., Becker, M. A., Griffiths, M. L. (2021). Ontogenetic growth pattern of the extinct megatooth shark Otodus megalodon—implications for its reproductive biology, development, and life expectancy. Historical Biology. Abstract: The extinct megatooth shark, Otodus megalodon (Lamniformes: Otodontidae), is known primarily from its gigantic teeth in the late Neogene marine fossil record. It is known to reach at least 14.1‒15.3 m in length, but its r
  12. I have seen several names for megalodon all with a different genus, which is correct? Edit: Another question, is cretalamna appendiculata the ancestor of otodus obliquis? Is there anything in between those if they are related? Do we know megalodon ancestry past C. appendiculata if it is directly related to O. Obliquis?
  13. Hi everyone. I am new to collecting fossils and have recently acquired my first 3 to start my collection. I have always been extreamly fascinated and intrigued by dinosaur bones and discoveries found all over the world and am really excited to have finally purchased my first few. Can anyone possibly give some feedback on this megalodon tooth i have and let me know if it shows any signs of being fake? My grandpa has had this one since he was a kid and decided to give it to me to add to my collection... he is unsure if it is real. Any feedback would be apprec
  14. BellamyBlake

    Megalodon Evolutionary Set

    I received the final piece needed for my Megalodon evolutionary set today! The hardest tooth to obtain by far was the Carcharocles mugodzharicus, and I would like to thank @MarcoSr for his help with that search as well as the generosity with which he shared knowledge about it. I'll mention that I acknowledge the various debates around species naming and went with the ones I believed to be the best fit. I kindly request that we not get into it on this thread.
  15. Hey everyone, Recently took a trip with a buddy of mine down to South Carolina to search for megalodon teeth. We found many small teeth along with some decent sized ones. These were found in the general area between Charleston and Summerville. The ruler is imperial. Big thanks to everyone who offers their guesses Pictured are three of my biggest from the whole trip. What are they?
  16. Matt Stratton

    Carcharocles

    This group of teeth should be from the Eocene period? Carcharocles Auriculatus I am guessing due to the size of the cusp?? Teeth are 1.4" and found in the Chandler bridge formation.
  17. Hey all! This week my colleagues and I published a paper we spent most of the last decade sweating over. It is an exhaustive report of all known late Miocene-Pleistocene records of teeth of Otodus (aka Carcharocles) megalodon teeth from the west coast in an attempt to estimate the date at which O megalodon went extinct. Aside from some conspiracy theorists who will wait until they die and not see a live 'meg', we all know it's not living today as there is not a shred of positive evidence indicating its existence. We know it's around in the Miocene, and the early Pliocene. Did it survive into t
  18. Macrophyseter

    DKNC-001 Carcharocles auriculatus (Togo)

    From the album: Elasmobranchs

    TFF DKNC-001 Tooth height is 2-3/8 inches (≈6 cm)

    © David Kn.

  19. HoppeHunting

    Megalodon or Chubutensis?

    Hello everyone, If you saw my most recent trip report, you know that I just found my first meg tooth! However, I'm not entirely sure whether the tooth is from Carcharocles megalodon or Carcharocles chubutensis. The tooth was found at Bayfront Park/Brownies Beach, which is the northernmost part of the Calvert Cliffs. The sediments exposed in the cliffs here are from the Calvert Formation, roughly 18-22 million years old. This would be right around the time when the great Megalodon first emerged. I remember reading that the majority of megateeth found at Brownies are chubs, but that
  20. Macrophyseter

    Carcharocles megalodon (Joe Cōcke collection)

    From the album: Elasmobranchs

    I do not own this rare tooth. It is from the collection of paleontologist Joe Cōcke, which he found locally and gladly allowed me to photograph.
  21. eannis6

    This Summer’s Finds

    Hello all! While these are all only pieces of teeth, I have found two species I never have before. I found an angustidens as well as a small GW fragment. If any of my ID guesses are wrong, feel free to point them out. Thanks for looking. Also, notice the serrations in the close ups of the GW fragment and how they differ from the close ups of a baby meg.
  22. Still_human

    Megalodon teeth

    From the album: Sharks and fish

    Megalodon tooth and tooth fragments.
  23. Hi there, i found this today within the shingle at Walton on the Naze in Essex, UK. The usual teeth found here are striatolamia and Otodus but in humble opinion this doesn’t appear like any of those. Dare I say more like carcharocles (is that spelled right?) I’m trying to not get too excited but any help would be appreciated.
  24. There are many debates over nomenclature in the paleontological world, and although our say has little to do with any decision made, I thought it would be fun to see what it would be like if we did decide such matters. Today, I ask your opinions on one of these. This is the debate over the placement of the deceased shark that goes by the species name hastilis. After a lengthy talk on a random thread (sorry mods) with @Macrophyseter I thought it would be intresting to see others view points. You have three choices, Isurus the genus in which the makos sit, long held to be the genus where hastili
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