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  1. Lando_Calrissian_4tw

    Aurora Dig Pit Fossils

    Soooo a few days ago new material was dumped at the Aurora Fossil Museum. Well, I made the trip there before the Saturday crowds, and was well rewarded!!! These were the best finds of the day =p btw the stuff underneath the shark verts are 2 stingray spines, a filefish vert, a burrfish bone, a beat up dolphin jaw bone, and what I think is some type of fish skull cap
  2. isurus90064

    Extraordinary Common Teeth

    Hey guys, I've been off the radar for awhile .. work you know .. been working on Siggraph for those of you who are familiar with software development. Just wanted to start a new topic here .. This one is right at 3.00" - 7.62cm C. carcharias Bahia Inglesa Formation South of Caldera Provincia Copiapo III Regio de Atacama Chile
  3. RickCalif

    Carcharocles chubutensis

    From the album: Shark teeth

    Predecessor to the Megdolon lived during Oligocene, Miocene, and Pliocene.
  4. TeethCollector

    Is this a chubutensis?

    I am looking for nice chubutensis tooth and I saw this on online. Please help me figure out what this is.. Is this a chubu or meg? I know nothing about locality of this fossil except Southeastern US..
  5. Fossil_finder_

    Lucky Chubutensis

    I was hunting a site on the Potomac looking for some Eocene and Miocene fossils yesterday. When I got to the site I found this gorgeous snake vertebrae about 15 minutes into my trip, so I knew it was going to be a good day. After that it was slow collecting for the next few hours, I was only picking up a tooth every once in a while despite the incredible conditions. But then, 10 minutes before I was about to leave I stumbled upon my best chubutensis yet at about 2 3/4 in. (or 7 cm) rolling around in the surf. One that I have been dreaming about ever since a starting collecting two years
  6. Aurora28

    Chubutensis Shark Tooth?

    Any chance this is a Chubutensis tooth? I bought it from a seller in Canada for cheap and the description only said it was a Meg from southeastern, USA. I'm no expert, but I don't think I see cusplets, but it's a thin tooth. It's about 1.5 inches. Any help is greatly appreciated!
  7. Fossil_finder_

    Chubutensis

    From the album: Potomac river

    2 3/4 in. Chubutensis
  8. While this tooth is obviously damaged, the cusplet sticks out to me. It is a decent sized tooth around 3 and 3/8" (84MM) long. Serrations are evident, although have been eroded. This tooth came from the James River, South Carolina. I cannot decide whether it looks more like auriculatus, chubutensis, augustidens, or megalodon. Carcharocles/Otodus... take your pick. I'd appreciate any input - thank you.
  9. I have here four shark teeth, 1" - 1.5" each. They were found in the Southeastern United States. I have no locality more specific than that. I think they're Angustidens or Auriculatus, but I can't really differentiate between these. Could anyone kindly help me identify them? I'd also appreciate if someone can nail the locality down based on the preservation. It's chalky, but the colors of the more orange ones don't really match Bone Valley. Might it be a South Carolina landsite? Thank you, Bellamy 1 2 3
  10. Bails

    Shark Tooth ID Request

    Hey All, I found this tooth on an early afternoon hunt today in Charleston, SC. I wanted to see if anyone could confirm if it is a Carcharocles angustiden or if it could possibly be a Carcharocles chubutensis. Reason I ask is the cusps on the side seem less pronounced then other Angy’s I have found and seen. They don’t appear to have broken off. My initial thought is that it is an Angy, but wanted to doubles check. Happy to post additional pics if needed. Thanks in advance!
  11. Hi guys I have 2 shark teeth, a megalodon from South Carolina and a chubutensis from Peru, both teeth are authentic but have different characteristics for example the enamel between the crown and serrations on the megalodon is really standout and flickers in the light, how ever the chubutensis is barely noticeable and bland, also the root on the megalodon is almost rough feeling as the chubutensis is really smooth, is this to do with how they have fossilised different around the world, I’m keen to hear what u have to say see photos below ! Thanks in advance
  12. Hey guys I recently purchased a chub tooth with no repairs or restoration how ever looking at the tooth it almost looks like there is a shiny varnish type sealer in some areas mainly the burette and at the start of the blade was wondering if anyone has come across this and can give me some information, the tooth was purchased from a respected and trusted dealer I’ve tried taking photos but you can’t see it, (tooth is from Peru chinlay) thanks in advanced
  13. Andy123

    Shark tooth ID

    Hi guys I have an angustidens tooth (on the left) and a Chubutensis Tooth (on the right) I am finding it hard to separate the 2 as different species as they look very similar, the only difference I notice is the roots are different, are there any key factors to look out for with identifying the 2. Thanks
  14. Andy123

    First chub tooth

    Hey guys I purchased my first ever Chubutensis tooth a love it! I don’t no a lot about the species and would like to know more, this chub tooth has big side cusp and would like to know if it’s a transition tooth or just how this tooth is as it’s quite large (7cm width 9cm length) thanks
  15. BellamyBlake

    Megalodon Evolutionary Set

    I received the final piece needed for my Megalodon evolutionary set today! The hardest tooth to obtain by far was the Carcharocles mugodzharicus, and I would like to thank @MarcoSr for his help with that search as well as the generosity with which he shared knowledge about it. I'll mention that I acknowledge the various debates around species naming and went with the ones I believed to be the best fit. I kindly request that we not get into it on this thread.
  16. BellamyBlake

    Chubutensis

    Hi everyone, I'm looking to buy a Chubutensis tooth. I know the question of identifying Chubutensis and its confusion with Megalodon gets posted a lot. I read through the previous topics, and tried to learn how one might differentiate it from Megalodon. It's identified as a Chubutensis tooth, found off the coast of North Carolina. Everything I've read leads me to believe this is a Megalodon - most importantly, I don't see the cusps. I do see the cracks where the cusps may have been, but I also read discussion on other threads saying this is somewhat common and doesn't n
  17. Dudeser

    Fossil ID Chubutensis

    Hi! I'm looking to buy a good Chubutensis tooth, and I came across this online. It's listed by a seller with a very good reputation, but I know that Megalodon teeth are often mistaken for Chubutensis teeth. I'd therefore like to have some seasoned shark tooth collectors help verify the ID of this tooth (I always like to double-check ) Note: It was found in South Carolina. Thanks in advance!
  18. sharkdoctor

    A poo-tastic day

    @Gizmo and I had a chance to get to a couple of sites in eastern Virginia during the super dry conditions that we are having during August. We hit the water early, after a rare cooler night. The mist over the stream made navigation a little tougher, but the view was beautiful! I had a moment of clarity in understanding that a strong part of my love of fossil hunting is that it takes me to beautiful and wild out-of-the-way places. The water conditions made for some interesting finds out of the Calvert Formation. We did some bulk sampling for a museum project but mostly got in
  19. I am new to collecting meg teeth so I hope my question is not “dumb.” Are the tooth cusps on a C. chubutensis vestigial structures from the earlier three pronged tooth like on O. obliquus? I read a physics article about how the megs tooth serration evolves from the smaller prong teeth getting sharks caught on larger prey causing them damage. Did the improved serration as the sharks evolved to be larger lead adult C. megladon adults not having cusps at all? I hope the question makes sense.
  20. Maxsg

    Chubutensis or Angustiden

    So I have posted a picture of this tooth before but I was recently showing it to a buddy and he said it looked like a chub but the cusps make me think angustidens. I want to know what you all think. I found this in an area that the formation is exposed in spots. The clay is a thick white clay speckled with tiny pebbles and other fossils. my geological maps that i used to find the location say that it is of Miocene age in the hawthorn group. However I am starting to think that there might be older clays exposed in the area. Please help me figure out what kind of tooth I have here, thank you.
  21. HoppeHunting

    Hop 5 01/25/19

    (I will now be using the poll format, so you can actually click your favorite and the poll will keep track of the votes) 1. Carcharocles chubutensis: MY FIRST MEGATOOTH! A bit of damage near the root and a missing bourlette, but a gorgeous tooth nonetheless. The serrations are absolutely killer. It’s about 1 ¾ inches. Colors completely changed when it dried. I. Am. Ecstatic. 2. Carcharias cuspidata: Very large sand tiger with a beautiful hooked double cusp on one shoulder. Excellent preservation, and certainly a necklace quality tooth. 3. Notorynchus primige
  22. After just over a year of fossil collecting, I have finally found my first Meg! On Thursday, the first semester of my senior year came to an end. The next day, Friday, school was closed for a teacher work day. I figured I'd make the most of my day off by heading out to Bayfront Park. What better way to celebrate making it through the first half of senior year? I though that because it was a Friday, and rather cold, not many people would be out on the beach because they'd either be at school, work, or home because of the weather. I was right. When I arrived at a little before noon,
  23. HoppeHunting

    Megalodon or Chubutensis?

    Hello everyone, If you saw my most recent trip report, you know that I just found my first meg tooth! However, I'm not entirely sure whether the tooth is from Carcharocles megalodon or Carcharocles chubutensis. The tooth was found at Bayfront Park/Brownies Beach, which is the northernmost part of the Calvert Cliffs. The sediments exposed in the cliffs here are from the Calvert Formation, roughly 18-22 million years old. This would be right around the time when the great Megalodon first emerged. I remember reading that the majority of megateeth found at Brownies are chubs, but that
  24. Brett Breakin' Rocks

    Chubutensis or Megalodon ?

    Hello Everyone, Something that has always confused me ... teeth like this. This was a tooth pulled from Savannah River dredge material. I can't confirm the formations but the dredge worked the river to 47foot depth. I've read in some spots that the material could possibly be as old as Miocene. My assumption when I am hunting is Pliocene to Pleistocene. Is this just a juvenile meg tooth with cusps or a chubutensis tooth ? Should the cusps be more integrated into the blade ? 2 inches on the slant. Anyhoo ... an outlier to the teeth that I normally find which are so
  25. Thinking about selecting a light sand color for the background to make these teeth pop. Here’s an evolutionary display of the Megalodon. Left-to-right: O. obliques, O. auriculatus, O. angustiden, O. chubutensis, O. megalodon. Notice the abscence of cusps from the Meg. The two right most teeth are from Calvert Cliffs, the two in the middle from South Carolina, and the far left from Morocco. FYI @Kurt Komoda @FossilSloth @caldigger @SailingAlongToo @Malcolmt
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