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  1. On September 17th, 2022, ESCONI held a field trip to a coal mine spoil pile near Danville, IL. It was a fairly hot day with temperatures in the upper 80's. However, it was a productive field trip. There had been quite a bit of work on the hill this summer and it was looking quite different from the spring. The road to the top went around from the left instead of the right. There weren't as many exposed fossils in "Red Dog" found this time, but concretions were readily available for collecting. There were a few Forum members present. @deutscheben @connorp I'm sure I'm forge
  2. My last few excursions have been a continuation of my exploration of the Woodbine. In my experience, it is a very difficult formation to hunt on, so even the smallest of discoveries is a welcome sight to behold. If you have the fortune of finding something there, it is likely to be different and unlike anything from the nearby surrounding formations. My most recent outing took me to an exposure rich with coalified material. The "peat" layer I dug into was extremely brittle and fell apart with minimal effort. Densely packed in was numerous chunks of wood and fragments of leaves likely from the
  3. Hello everyone, I have recently received an old collection from an old married couple who weren't interested in it anymore. Some of the items were purchased in 1905! They got them from the man's father who was Dutch. Unfortunately, many of the fossils did not come with their labels, and the labels I do have are written in Dutch, and in cursive... I will be posting most of the fossils on the forum through the next few days in hopes of getting some id's, locations, ages, as well as any other useful information. If the photos aren't clear enough just tell me the number so
  4. Hello dear forum members, among the collection of my late uncle there was a box of coal fossils, most of which are flat crumbly pieces of plant material. I left most of these in their protective wrappings for now. among the fragments on the bottom of the box I found some nodules, I think these caught my uncles eye and where collected on the same trip as the plant fossils. (from Germany, hard coal, not lignite, thats all I know). The nodules are heavy like ore minerals (pyrite comes to mind) There is one with an interesting texture. Maybe a coprolite?? @GeschWhat?
  5. Hi everyone! I'm new to fossil hunting and I found a few interesting rocks underneath Sea Cliff Bridge near Wollongong in Australia. There was a lot of coal in the area for context. I will attach some photos of the rocks I found, I'm particularly interested in the small white (quartz??) lines intersecting the black part of the stone. Any help would be hugely appreciated! Thanks
  6. Eloise

    Late Carboniferous Megaspore

    Hi everyone, I've been working on a project about fossilised megaspores found in a Namurian (Late Carboniferous) coal seam in the UK. There are very few papers and photographs of megaspores so classification is a challenge! I have a couple of my unidentified specimens here that have been extracted from the coal, and was wondering if anyone could help me out? Light microscope images are attatched. The maximum diameter of the compressed spore is 1125 µm for Species A, and 1225 µm for Species B. I believe that the depositional environment was a Late Carbonifer
  7. Hi people! I'm a PhD student studying a Duckmantian fossil forest in North Wales. I have found these phosphatic fish/shark? teeth and scales I need an ID on. I suspect they are Adamantina Foliacea (Cuny and Stemmerik 2018) but that is a marine shark and this sequence is almost certainly completely freshwater and thought to be an upland swamp. I'm currently doing isotope work on the nodules and plant fossils and that appears to be confirming this is a completely freshwater system. Anyone have any ideas? You'll have to click on the images again once you've opened them to
  8. Barrelcactusaddict

    Krantzite (Profen Fm., ~41.3-38 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    “Krantzite” Profen Coal Mine Profen, Saxony-Anhalt State, Germany Profen Fm. (~41.3-38 Ma) Chemical Composition: C: 79.25%, H: 10.41%, O: 10.34% Total Weight: 1.5g Longest Specimen: 14mm Lighting: 140lm LED Longwave UV Entry four of ten, detailing various rare ambers from European, Asian, and North American localities. This amber has rather unusual physical properties, despite being chemically quite near to succinite (i.e. Baltic amber), in terms of carbon,

    © Kaegen Lau

  9. Barrelcactusaddict

    Krantzite (Profen Fm., ~41.3-38 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    “Krantzite” Profen Coal Mine Profen, Saxony-Anhalt State, Germany Profen Fm. (~41.3-38 Ma) Chemical Composition: C: 79.25%, H: 10.41%, O: 10.34% Total Weight: 1.5g Longest Specimen: 14mm Lighting: 140lm LED Longwave UV Entry four of ten, detailing various rare ambers

    © Kaegen Lau

  10. Barrelcactusaddict

    Ajkaite (Ajka Coal Fm./Csehbánya Fm., ~86.8-83.4 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    "Ajkaite" Ajka-Csingervölgy, Ajka District, Hungary Ajka Coal Fm./Csehbánya Fm. (~86.8-83.4 Ma) Chemical Composition: C: 80%, H: 10%, O: 9%, S: 1-2% Refractive Index: 1.541 Specific Gravity: 1.0 Weight of Specimen: 2.4g Dimensions: 18x14x13mm Lighting: Longwave UV (Convoy S2) Ajkaite is a fossil resin with chemical composition markedly different from succinite (i.e., Baltic amber); it also contains low levels of sulfur. Ajkaite is found within layers of fossiliferous marl (numerous fossil shells can be seen in the matrix in the images): the marl is also acco

    © Kaegen Lau

  11. Barrelcactusaddict

    Ajkaite (Ajka Coal Fm./Csehbánya Fm., ~86.8-83.4 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    "Ajkaite" Ajka-Csingervölgy, Ajka District, Hungary Ajka Coal Fm./Csehbánya Fm. (~86.8-83.4 Ma) Chemical Composition: C: 80%, H: 10%, O: 9%, S: 1-2% Refractive Index: 1.541 Specific Gravity: 1.0 Weight of Specimen: 2.4g Dimensions: 18x14x13mm Lighting: Longwave UV (Convoy S2) Ajkaite is a fossil resin with chemical composition markedly different from succinite (i.e., Baltic amber); it also contains low levels of sulfur. Ajkaite is found within layers of fossiliferous marl (numerous fossil shells can be seen in the matrix in the images): the marl is also accompan

    © Kaegen Lau

  12. Barrelcactusaddict

    Ajkaite (Ajka Coal Fm./Csehbánya Fm., ~86.8-83.4 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    "Ajkaite" Ajka-Csingervölgy, Ajka District, Hungary Ajka Coal Fm./Csehbánya Fm. (~86.8-83.4 Ma) Chemical Composition: C: 80%, H: 10%, O: 9%, S: 1-2% Refractive Index: 1.541 Specific Gravity: 1.0 Weight of Specimen: 2.4g Dimensions: 18x14x13mm Ajkaite is a fossil resin with chemical composition markedly different from succinite (i.e., Baltic amber); it also contains low levels of sulfur. Ajkaite is found within layers of fossiliferous marl (numerous fossil shells can be seen in the matrix in the images): the marl is also accompanied by layers of coal, sand, sandstone,

    © Kaegen Lau

  13. Barrelcactusaddict

    Ajkaite (Ajka Coal Fm./Csehbánya Fm., ~86.8-83.4 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    "Ajkaite" Ajka-Csingervölgy, Ajka District, Hungary Ajka Coal Fm./Csehbánya Fm. (~86.8-83.4 Ma) Chemical Composition: C: 80%, H: 10%, O: 9%, S: 1-2% Refractive Index: 1.541 Specific Gravity: 1.0 Weight of Specimen: 2.4g Dimensions: 18x14x13mm Ajkaite is a fossil resin with chemical composition markedly different from succinite (i.e., Baltic amber); it also contains low levels of sulfur. Ajkaite is found within layers of fossiliferous marl (numerous fossil shells can be seen in the matrix in the images): the marl is also accompanied by layers of coal, sand, sandstone,

    © Kaegen Lau

  14. Barrelcactusaddict

    Fushun Amber (Guchenzgi Fm., 56-50 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    Roughly 200g of small (≈1g) nodules and runs of amber from the West Open Pit Mine in Fushun, China; the mine was closed in 2019, but small pieces of amber are still recovered from coal found in the gangue piles; it is separated from the matrix by mechanical action and immersion in large vats of saltwater solution, and recovered with netting as it collects at the surface. This material is hard, takes a high polish, and is often shaped and drilled to make beads. Its chemical and spectrographic signatures indicate this amber is derived from a cupressaceous source.

    © Kaegen Lau

  15. Barrelcactusaddict

    Alaskan Amber (Beluga Fm. [Kenai Group], ~11.6-5.3 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    Waterworn amber from the beaches near Homer, Alaska; this piece weighs 0.7g and measures 11x9x9mm. The town of Homer is situated on the shores of the Cook Inlet on the western half of the Kenai Peninsula, south of Anchorage. A few geological Formations (Kenai Group) in the nearby area contain coal reserves, but mainly the Beluga Fm. is exposed along the beaches of Homer to Anchor Point: this Formation is of freshwater origin, and comprises layers of sandstone, siltstone, and coal. The Pliocene-aged Sterling Fm. is located slightly farther inland, with numerous streams cutting through it and em

    © Kaegen Lau

  16. Barrelcactusaddict

    Alaskan Amber (Beluga Fm. [Kenai Group], ~11.6-5.3 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    11g of waterworn amber from the beaches near Homer, Alaska; this town is situated on the shores of the Cook Inlet on the western half of the Kenai Peninsula, south of Anchorage. A few geological Formations (Kenai Group) in the nearby area contain coal reserves, but mainly the Beluga Fm. is exposed along the beaches of Homer to Anchor Point: this Formation is of freshwater origin, and comprises layers of sandstone, siltstone, and coal. The Pliocene-aged Sterling Fm. is located slightly farther inland, with numerous streams cutting through it and emptying into the Cook Inlet, however this Format

    © Kaegen Lau

  17. Hi all, So I found this odd piece of petrified wood on Marrowstone Island in Washington state. I find petrified wood often on the beach here. This one has a dark band running through the specimen. The dark band is coal like except it has wood grain banding in it as well. The band is brittle and I broke off a few chunks and tried to burn them, and they do quite like charcoal. Now I also managed to get a small piece of the petrified wood to come off and it did not burn. I am positive the wood is petrified too, I have many samples of it I have found including one weighing over 60lbs.
  18. Barrelcactusaddict

    Sumatra Blue Amber (Sinamar Fm., ~30 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    4.3g dark, transparent blue amber from West Sumatra. After grinding and polishing, I was surprised to discover that it contains 2 ants and 2 winged ants (possibly wasps); these were a little tricky to photograph, due to the amber's strong fluorescence under 140 lumen LED light, so these inclusions had to be backlit. I used a Canon EOS 500D, Canon 60mm f/2.8 Macro Lens, and combined 2x and 4x Hoya circular magnifier lenses (8x).

    © Kaegen Lau

  19. From the album: Plants

    cladophlebis tenuipinnula Holmes 2002 Nymboida Coal Measures. Farquahars (Coal)Seam. Nymboida New South Wales Australia
  20. Barrelcactusaddict

    Fushun Amber (Guchenzgi Fm., 56-50 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    A small, partially broken nodule of amber from the West Open Pit Mine in Fushun, China, weighing .8g and measuring (mm) 15x11x10. The mine was closed in 2019, but small pieces of amber are still recovered from coal found in the gangue piles; it is separated from the matrix by mechanical action and immersion in large vats of saltwater solution, and recovered with netting as it collects at the surface. This material is hard, takes a high polish, and is often shaped and drilled to make beads. Its chemical and spectrographic signatures indicate this amber is derived from a cupressaceous source.

    © Kaegen Lau

  21. Barrelcactusaddict

    Fushun Amber (Guchenzgi Fm., 56-50 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    A small run of amber from the West Open Pit Mine in Fushun, China, weighing .7g and measuring (mm) 11x15x9; the oblique view better displays the slightly oxidized surface of the largest flow in the piece. The mine was closed in 2019, but small pieces of amber are still recovered from coal found in the gangue piles; it is separated from the matrix by mechanical action and immersion in large vats of saltwater solution, and recovered with netting as it collects at the surface. This material is hard, takes a high polish, and is often shaped and drilled to make beads. Its chemical and spectrographi

    © Kaegen Lau

  22. Barrelcactusaddict

    Fushun Amber (Guchenzgi Fm., 56-50 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    A small run of amber from the West Open Pit Mine in Fushun, China, weighing .7g and measuring (mm) 11x15x9; note the several flow lines of successive runs. The mine was closed in 2019, but small pieces of amber are still recovered from coal found in the gangue piles; it is separated from the matrix by mechanical action and immersion in large vats of saltwater solution, and recovered with netting as it collects at the surface. This material is hard, takes a high polish, and is often shaped and drilled to make beads. Its chemical and spectrographic signatures indicate this amber is derived from

    © Kaegen Lau

  23. Barrelcactusaddict

    Fushun Amber (Guchenzgi Fm., 56-50 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    A small run of amber from the West Open Pit Mine in Fushun, China, weighing .7g and measuring (mm) 11x15x9. The mine was closed in 2019, but small pieces of amber are still recovered from coal found in the gangue piles; it is separated from the matrix by mechanical action and immersion in large vats of saltwater solution, and recovered with netting as it collects at the surface. This material is hard, takes a high polish, and is often shaped and drilled to make beads. Its chemical and spectrographic signatures indicate this amber is derived from a cupressaceous source.

    © Kaegen Lau

  24. Barrelcactusaddict

    Canadian Amber (Allenby Fm., 52.5-48 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    Closeup of material from previous entry.

    © Kaegen Lau

  25. hello all, I found a lot of this specific type of rock and I thought they could be fossils. Now I'm not so sure. They have what appears to have a spongy inside and flat outside, on the sides that are still there. I tried to take pictures to show them well. A few of the pieces have two "lobes" at one end and the lobes appear to be splitting. They are all the same color, though some are dry and some are damp still. I was trying to figure this out on my own, and I thought it could possibly be coal (if not a fossil), but i really don't know how to test it. My husband did try to light i
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