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  1. Went on a creek excursion to hunt marine fossils several weeks back. I was hesitant about bringing home micro material because last years material from same site didn't produce any stellar finds, so I thought? I brought home a gallon zip lock bag full hoping to try my luck again and glad I did... not bad for a plastic bag of material in a smaller quantity. Brachiopod steinkern, Pseudocorax, Scapanorynchus teeth, Enchodus and Pachyrhizodus fish tooth. Cretaceous Period, Mooreville Chalk, Southeastern USA. Ya gotta love the color of the teeth!
  2. It had been quite sometime since I got to go do some creek hunting for marine fossils. We get to visit this particular private property site once a year and this year it didn't disappoint. I found my first ever Mosasaur vertebrate! I find its teeth all the time, and my hunting buddies always find the verts... this time it was my day. I found shark and fish teeth, worm burrows and bits of bone. It was a great day and haul of some cool fossils!
  3. We've been getting a lot of rain lately and wondered since the beginning of the new year if we'd ever make it to a creek to do some fossil hunting. This particular Saturday called for 90% rain but was fortunate to have the Friday off, so my hunting buddies and I went to the creek! When we got there we anticipated the water levels would be slightly higher considering the year already, and it was siftable. I found me a gravel bar and wasn't disappointed the entire time there! Above you will see the bottom half of an arrowhead made out of yellow jasper. Shark teeth from the
  4. I've got great hunting buddies! I had to work the day they went to a creek in South Alabama to hunt for fossils. Not being able to go to the creek, they brought the creek to me in a bucket! Nothing like sitting on your balcony sifting for shark teeth! I found several nice sized shark teeth, that got caught in the 1/4" mesh consisting of Scapanorynchus (goblin shark), Squalicorax, (crow shark), fish teeth, Enchodus and Pycnodont. Mid-size teeth that didn't get through my colander such as Scapanorynchus (goblin shark), Squalicorax, (crow shark), two tiny Ptychodus teeth, two Hybodont
  5. Howdy Y'all! Micro fossilizing is addictive and got bit by the bug sometime last year. I often wondered what actually got through my 1/4" mesh sifter while sifting for marine fossils and shark teeth! Well, wonder no more. After piling the gravel that went through the sifter I would place the gravel in a 2 gallon bucket to take home and inspect later. Now every trip to a creek I do it religiously because of the addiction! Some creeks are really productive and other creeks not so much but what drives me is the thrill of what I'm going to find in the next pour of the red solo cup into the white p
  6. Rockin' Ric

    Cretaceous Microfossils

    Hello all! I have been hunting shark teeth for about 8 months now thanks to a hunting buddy who has access to private property with a creek running through it that contains Cretaceous marine fossils. While sifting on the creek one day I wondered what got through my 1/4" mesh so I bucketed up the gravel and took home. Once the gravel dried I placed a lil' bit at a time in a white paper plate do see what was going back into the creek after sifting. I was astonished at what I was finding! Perfectly preserved tiny teeth from sharks, rays and other fossil organisms! After two buckets I was hooked o
  7. Rockin' Ric

    Cretaceous Shark Poop

    Hello All! I've been fortunate to have a hunting buddy who has access to private property where the Cretaceous material is dense. One of my favorite fossils to hunt are the Shark Coprolites. Although the teeth and bone are the greater draw it doesn't disappoint when a Coprolite is found. Looking forward to finding more of these on future trips.
  8. Rockin' Ric

    Cretaceous Marine Fossils

    It's been over a month since I was down on the creek. Here are some of my favorite finds. It has rained quite a bit the past month or so which means higher water levels and stronger current than what we are accustomed too. Living in the South, temperatures don't drop below the 30's much but the past few months have been cold so the waters on the creek were quite chilly. Have you guys had your sifter float away before? Mine did because I got distracted forgetting that the current was strong! Fortunately for me, my hunting buddies were several hundred yards downstream after yelling for help, was
  9. Rockin' Ric

    Eutaw Formation Fossils

    Hey y'all! I've only been shark teeth hunting for about 8 months and its addictive that's for sure! One of the coolest and unique finds would be shark teeth in matrix. Here are two examples although they are tiny teeth, I believe they are Cetalamna's? Both were found in two separate creeks approximately 75 miles from each other. The first one is in Coquina matrix (a closeup shot), found while sifting. I reached into the sifter not seeing the tooth and it cut my dang finger drawing blood...ouch! It's safe to say the tooth still works or was bitten by 85 million year old shark. The second tooth
  10. Hello all! Most of us like em' big...that is fossilized shark teeth! Most sifters generally have the 1/4 " mesh which catch the big teeth. Lil' did I know what got through that mesh until I took a bucket home to resift later. Upon resifting I find these tiny teeth, Scapanorynchus Texanus, Cretalamna, Cretoxyrhina, and Squalicorax. Realizing that sharks and fishes started off small to get big. Finding these tiny teeth now is just as exciting as sifting on the creek itself! Also pictured is a Brachiopod and Turitella. Go ahead, I know ya want to sing it...Baby Shark Doo doo, doo doo doo doo...
  11. Hello all! My last post showed my participation hunting shark teeth and marine fossils in our state. I mostly collect Carboniferous Plant Fossils and happy to say I've added shark teeth/vertebrate, Ptychodus, Enchodus and Mosasaur teeth...Ammonites, Baculite, ray and sawfish teeth (micro teeth) to my collection as well as coprolites. A few samples pictured. Sifting marine fossils can be quite addictive! In addition to that my hunting buddies and I continue to find archaic material as well such as Native American arrowheads and pottery shards. The site is private property but such a beautiful,
  12. Hello again! My hunting buddies and I were invited down to the Southern part of our state on Wednesday to hunt Cretaceous fossils with some Pliocene overlap on private property. The site was on a creek with a beautiful setting on a sunny, gorgeous day! The creek didn't disappoint although most of the shark teeth found were broken, but the bone and Native American pottery shard finds made up for it. My finds of the day were the Enchodus teeth and mandibles. We were onsite for several hours and didn't want to overstay our welcome so we packed our things up and visited with the property owner and
  13. Rockin' Ric

    Shark Teeth

    Hello all! The past four months have been quite the adventure. I was introduced to shark tooth hunting in my state and have to admit its quite addictive, especially if you have permission to visit sites and those sites produce. Most of my posts have been mostly plant and trace fossils from the Carboniferous Period but now I can add the Cretaceous Period to that list of fossil find posts. Now learning to name and identify shark, fish and other marine fossil that are found on site. In this new quest I have been fortunate to join four hunting buddies who are knowledgeable in
  14. Rockin' Ric

    Cretaceous Shark Teeth

    It was a gorgeous hot steamy day in Central Alabama. I spent a few minutes in the sun and after 15 minutes and decided I wanted none of it! The creek ran under a clump of trees with a narrow gravel bar and a tree buried under some it. There I plopped my butt down and started sifting the gravel, this was my first time doing this and my first home built sifter! I found these shark teeth and fish tooth. It was definitely cooler under the trees with the water all around me. As our time there was about to end, the beauty of the area was shattered when three clowns show up with an AR15 shooting into
  15. ancientlifecaptor

    Theropod Dinosaur Tooth from Morocco ID

    HI, I purchased this Unidentified theropod tooth a few years ago from a seller that sold it as a "Raptor" tooth. It is from the Kem Kem beds from Morocco, during the late Cretaceous Period. It is 1.3 Centimetres (1/2 inch) long. The seller also mentioned that it may likely be from an Abelisaurid. I think that it is most likely an Abelisaurid tooth and I am looking forward to updating it's identification tag in my collection. Yet I need to be certain that I am correctly identifying this tooth. What are your thoughts about what this tooth could be? I apologize if I spelled/addressed the names i
  16. Article Link: http://www.sci-news.com/paleontology/origolestes-lii-07880.html Enjoy!
  17. Bedrock

    Frontal Jaw Fragment

    I found several bone fragments with broken teeth, location is Rosebud County Montana, these were picked from a coulee located on private property. The fragments may or may not be from the same specimen but all were collected within a few yards up or downstream from each other. I was only able to attach this one pic, warning says I can only upload 3.95m.,,, is there a way to attach more without cutting picture quality?
  18. Dpaul7

    MILLIPEDE CRETACEOUS 1.jpg

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Diplopoda (Millipede) in Amber Burma Cretaceous Period (95 to 100 million years ago) This piece measures 15 mm long by 15 mm wide by 4 mm thick. Millipede is 8 mm. Millipedes are a group of arthropods that are characterised by having two pairs of jointed legs on most body segments; they are known scientifically as the class Diplopoda, the name being derived from this feature. Each double-legged segment is a result of two single segments fused together. Most millipedes have very elongated cylindrical or flattened bodies with more than 20 segments, while pill millipedes are shorter a
  19. Dpaul7

    MILLIPEDE CRETACEOUS 1.jpg

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Diplopoda (Millipede) in Amber Burma Cretaceous Period (95 to 100 million years ago) This piece measures 15 mm long by 15 mm wide by 4 mm thick. Millipede is 8 mm. Millipedes are a group of arthropods that are characterised by having two pairs of jointed legs on most body segments; they are known scientifically as the class Diplopoda, the name being derived from this feature. Each double-legged segment is a result of two single segments fused together. Most millipedes have very elongated cylindrical or flattened bodies with more than 20 segments, while pill millipedes are shorter a
  20. Dpaul7

    MILLIPEDE CRETACEOUS 1.jpg

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Diplopoda (Millipede) in Amber Burma Cretaceous Period (95 to 100 million years ago) This piece measures 15 mm long by 15 mm wide by 4 mm thick. Millipede is 8 mm. Millipedes are a group of arthropods that are characterised by having two pairs of jointed legs on most body segments; they are known scientifically as the class Diplopoda, the name being derived from this feature. Each double-legged segment is a result of two single segments fused together. Most millipedes have very elongated cylindrical or flattened bodies with more than 20 segments, while pill millipedes are shorter a
  21. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Prolylleceras peruvianum Ammonite Huaraz Province Ancash, Peru Cretaceous Period (145-66 million years ago) Slightly compressed and high whorled with radiate to prorsiradiate, straight to flexuous ribs, with ribs continuous across venter or in some flattened on it at early growth stages. Ventrolateral and siphonal clavi subordinate to ribs. No lateral tubercles on primitive morphologies. Outer lateral punctiform to clavate tubercles in evolute species during middle growth, perhaps not disappearing completely on body chamber. Inner lateral punctiform tubercles in most evolute species r
  22. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Prolylleceras peruvianum Ammonite Huaraz Province Ancash, Peru Cretaceous Period (145-66 million years ago) Slightly compressed and high whorled with radiate to prorsiradiate, straight to flexuous ribs, with ribs continuous across venter or in some flattened on it at early growth stages. Ventrolateral and siphonal clavi subordinate to ribs. No lateral tubercles on primitive morphologies. Outer lateral punctiform to clavate tubercles in evolute species during middle growth, perhaps not disappearing completely on body chamber. Inner lateral punctiform tubercles in most evolute species r
  23. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Prolylleceras peruvianum Ammonite Huaraz Province Ancash, Peru Cretaceous Period (145-66 million years ago) Slightly compressed and high whorled with radiate to prorsiradiate, straight to flexuous ribs, with ribs continuous across venter or in some flattened on it at early growth stages. Ventrolateral and siphonal clavi subordinate to ribs. No lateral tubercles on primitive morphologies. Outer lateral punctiform to clavate tubercles in evolute species during middle growth, perhaps not disappearing completely on body chamber. Inner lateral punctiform tubercles in most evolute species r
  24. Dpaul7

    Squalicorax Pristodontus 1.jpg

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Squalicorax pristodontus tooth Morocco Cretaceous Period (65 - 146 Million years ago) Squalicorax is a genus of extinct lamniform shark known to have lived during the Cretaceous period. These sharks are of medium size, up to 5 m (usually around 2 m) in length. Their bodies were similar to the modern gray sharks, but the shape of the teeth is strikingly similar to that of a tiger shark. The teeth are numerous, relatively small, with a curved crown and serrated, up to 2.5 – 3 cm in height (the only representative of the Mesozoic Lamniformes with serrated teeth). Large numbers of
  25. Dpaul7

    Squalicorax Pristodontus 1.jpg

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Squalicorax pristodontus tooth Morocco Cretaceous Period (65 - 146 Million years ago) Squalicorax is a genus of extinct lamniform shark known to have lived during the Cretaceous period. These sharks are of medium size, up to 5 m (usually around 2 m) in length. Their bodies were similar to the modern gray sharks, but the shape of the teeth is strikingly similar to that of a tiger shark. The teeth are numerous, relatively small, with a curved crown and serrated, up to 2.5 – 3 cm in height (the only representative of the Mesozoic Lamniformes with serrated teeth). Large numbers of
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